24h-payday

Archive

Posts Tagged ‘Sharon Muza’

Great Holiday Gift Ideas for your Favorite Childbirth Educator

December 16th, 2014 by avatar

SandS Great Gift IdeasAs the gift giving season is fast approaching, I wanted to put together some great gift ideas that any childbirth educator would love to receive this holiday season.  Stocking a childbirth education classroom with useful items can be expensive and even overwhelming for the educator just starting out.  Here are some must-have items that any childbirth educator would appreciate now or anytime during the year. Childbirth educators – what might be on your list that I did not included here? And, go ahead and print this list out or share online with friends and family,  so you can receive a CBE gift to warm your heart and that demonstrates how much your efforts to help families have a safe and healthy birth are appreciated.

A pelvic model

Having a pelvis on hand to demonstrate how the baby moves through the pelvis, rotating and descending during labor is a key part of any childbirth class.  Your favorite CBE will appreciate having one to use and they are often an expensive purchase.  I like this one for both it’s price, quick delivery and excellent reviews.  This is one of my most valuable teaching aids.

A knitted uterus

Having a knitted uterus is helpful for demonstrating how the cervix thins and opens during labor and birth. A knitted uterus can be purchased through various stores that sell childbirth teaching aids, or even on Amazon.com and often come with special features like detachable vagina and zippered uterine opening to represent a cesarean incision. If you are in any way crafty, you could consider knitting your own, using one of the many patterns that are available on line and customize it using the childbirth educator’s favorite colors.

www.etsy.com/shop/Anatomicalknits

www.etsy.com/shop/Anatomicalknits

A fetus

Having a fetal model to fit into the uterus and move through the pelvis makes for a great visual aid.  Childbirth Graphics sells one that fits through the standard model pelvis and holds up well through years of use.  You can also look around at some of the other sites listed below for comparison.

Bluetooth speakers

I am always grateful for my small, portable  but powerful rechargeable bluetooth speaker that I can connect to my phone, my tablet or my laptop for quick and easy sound projection.  I have had a few over the years and am currently thrilled with the Jam Classic in a color to match my classroom.  I previously owned this one until my teen daughters snatched them away. Buy your favorite, just make sure they are lightweight, rechargeable and work over bluetooth.

A subscription to “Up to Date”

I would love to be gifted a subscription to the research website “Up to Date” which provides current evidence based information and practice guidelines at your fingertips.  When a childbirth educator wants quick and easy access to all the most current information on treatments, protocols and recommendations for maternity care, s/he can quickly access this highly current resource.  While we are not clinicians, it is so helpful to be able to see the most current research as it is made available.  This gift would thrill me to no end.

Lamaze membership

Your favorite childbirth educator would love to have his or her Lamaze membership paid for!  S/he will get all the benefits of being a Lamaze member, including significant Kinkos/FedEx discounts, a year long subscription to the Journal of Perinatal Education, access to community boards on the Lamaze website and so much more.

Peanut and/or birth ball

peanut ballNo childbirth class is complete without a peanut or regular birth ball for the educator and students to use during classroom demonstrations and practice.  Lots of different sizes to choose from, but I recommend the 45 CM peanut ball and the 65 CM birth ball, likely to be the best size for many of the students.  Make sure the ball you buy is burst resistant.  You can get them on Amazon or at local sporting goods shops as well.  Here is some information on using the peanut ball during labor.

Unscented massage lotion or oil

Hand massage is often taught in childbirth classes as a form of relaxation.  Keep your favorite childbirth educator well supplied with a large bottle of a quality unscented lotion or oil.  Consider adding in some small plastic or glass bottles that s/he can fill an  handout during practice time and you will have a sure winner!

Newborn dolls

ikea dollIt is always fun to have a collection of newborn dolls to hand out when talking about life with a newborn, to practice swaddles with or to use during breastfeeding practice.  My favorite doll is the soft dolls available at at Ikea.  They are lightweight, about the right size, and at $10/each, very affordable, so I can purchase enough for every family to have one to practice on. I also like that they have different races, so my dolls can reflect my class members.

Laminator

I like to teach engaging and interactive childbirth classes and many of my activities involve cards as part of the learning.  I love having my own laminator so I can whip up new teaching tools and ideas right in my own home.  This affordable laminator has been a reliable workhorse for me for several years now without fail and I love making  professional looking materials to use in my childbirth class. I like to have two size lamination sheets – full page and quarter page.

Astrobrights colored paper

My handouts and laminated activity cards look fantastic on this super bright, super fun colored paper.  I love having a ream around the house for all my signs, projects and creative ideas. I also find the heavier cardstock useful at times too.

All kinds of markers, crayons and pens

There is nothing so sad as having a box of faded out, washed out permanent or low scent dry erase markers in my teaching supply box.  I love when the markers are bold and the dry erase/white board markers are strong and vibrant.  I always appreciate having a new supply on hand of both kinds of markers. I also use crayons in my classes and they get broken and used up!   A huge box of crayons would be super.  Even a jumbo box of pens – as students are always asking to borrow them and I never get them back.

Knitted breasts

knitted breasts

creative commons licensed (BY-NC-ND) flickr photo by seniwati: http://flickr.com/photos/seniwati/3182485430

If the childbirth educator on your list also teaches breastfeeding , she will want to have a nice collection of knitted breasts on hand for her classes.  This model is nice but rather expensive, It is nice to have one for each family.  Here is a pattern if you have the skills to make them yourself.  Or you can often find them on Etsy Remember, breasts can come in many different skin tones and all kinds of nipple, areola and breast sizes.

Swaddling blankets, cloth diaper samples, baby carriers

These may be things you have access to from your children as they have grown out of them, or you can take up a collection of used items from friends and family or even hit up the thrift shops.  Get a whole bunch together and gift them to the childbirth educator to use in class.  S/he will appreciate the variety and feel confident that s/he has enough for everyone in class to try some.

Gift certificates

If you are not sure what your childbirth educator needs – consider a gift certificate to one of the companies that sells teaching aids and instructional materials, and let the educator decide for him or herself what they can use.

Cascade Healthcare Products

Childbirth Graphics

Injoy Videos

Plumtree Baby

 

 

Childbirth Education, Social Media , , , ,

Prematurity Awareness Month – Test Your Knowledge on Our Quiz

November 25th, 2014 by avatar

Prematurity Awareness Month 2014As November comes to a close, you may have read or seen many articles on the topic of premature babies.  November is Prematurity Awareness Month, recognized in the United States and around the world.  Prematurity affects 15 million babies a year globally and the downstream health consequences to the babies are significant.  There is also a huge burden in terms of health care dollars that are required to treat the baby after birth and then potentially for many years beyond that.

In 2013, the national preterm birth rate fell to its lowest rate in 17 years.  This decrease helped us to meet the 2020 Healthy People Goals 7 years early, which is something to celebrate.  But overall, our prematurity rate is still nothing to be admired, as the United States has one of the highest rates amongst developed nations.

As childbirth educators, we are in a unique position to share information with families, including signs of preterm labor, risk factors and warning signs.  Having conversations in your classes can help families to recognize when something may not  be normal and encourages them to contact their doctor or midwife if they suspect they may be experiencing some of the signs of a potential preterm birth.  While no family wants to think that this might happen to them, bringing up the topic can help them to seek out help sooner.

Science & Sensibility has put together some resources that you can share with the families that you work with.  We also invite you to take the Prematurity Awareness Month Challenge Quiz, and test your knowledge on some basic facts about preterm birth.  See how well you do and compare your results with others also taking the quiz.

Resources to share

Go the Full 40 – AWHONN’s prematurity prevention campaign, including 40 reasons to go the full 40.

Healthy Babies are Worth the Wait – March of Dimes

Healthy People 2020 – Maternal, Infant & Child Health

March of Dimes Prematurity Report Card – Find your state’s grade

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention – Prematurity Awareness

March of Dimes Videos on Prematurity Awareness

Signs of Preterm Labor – March of Dimes Video

Preterm Labor Assessment Tool Kit for Health Professionals – March of Dimes.

How do you cover the topic of preterm labor in your classes?  What activities do you do?  What videos do you like to show?  Please share with others how you do your part to inform parents about this important topic and help to reduce prematurity in the families you work with.  Let us know in the comments section below.

 

Babies, Childbirth Education, Maternal Quality Improvement, Maternity Care, Newborns, Pain Management, Pre-term Birth , , , ,

Lamaze International Online Classes for Parents Expands Offerings!

November 11th, 2014 by avatar

Screen Shot 2014-11-10 at 5.16.54 PM

The Lamaze International Strategic Framework 2014-2017 that resulted from in-depth strategic planning meetings held earlier this year with the Board of Director and Lamaze Management resulted in many forward thinking, comprehensive and courageous goals, including plans to “innovate education and expand to the childbearing years” by:

  • reaching more women earlier and more frequently throughout childbearing years,
  • expanding delivery methods for online education (e.g., virtual classes, Facetime consults, and mobile apps), and
  • developing a strategy to broaden outreach at the electronic level and cultivate moms ‘up’ the ladder for more personalized services and training.

As part of fulfilling this mission, Lamaze International is pleased to announce that three online childbirth education classes are developed, online and open for business.  The first class to go live was “Safe and Healthy Birth: Six Simple Steps,” a class designed to help families prepare for birth by presenting six simple practices shown to greatly improve birth outcomes for both mothers and babies. The next two were recently added – VBAC: Informed and Ready and Breastfeeding Basics: From Birth to Back to Work.

The online classes are presented in an interactive, engaging format with unlimited access for parents, so they can complete the class(es) at their own pace. The classes are meant to be used as an important beginning point in a families’ complete prenatal education. They provide vital information, and throughout the online course, families are encouraged to find a comprehensive in person Lamaze class in order receive a thorough preparation for childbirth. Parents are informed that to be fully prepared for labor, birth, breastfeeding, and postpartum, it’s important to attend a good quality childbirth course. There are links to the “Find a Lamaze Class” portion of the parent website.

The online classes can be accessed on a computer (desktop or laptop), tablet or smartphone and learning can take place at a convenient time and place for each individual family.  There are interactive activities and discussion forums to connect with other participating families.  Fun quizzes are spaced throughout the course to help with the retention of information.

Safe and Healthy Birth: Six Simple Steps

Knowledge is power! It’s our goal to help you prepare for one of the most important days of your life – baby’s birthday! This course presents six simple practices that research has shown to greatly improve birth outcomes for both mothers and babies. These practices have been developed by Lamaze International and are based on recommendations by the World Health Organization. Lamaze has simplified the scientific facts into six healthy birth practices to make it easy for you to choose the safest care, understand your options, and steer clear of care practices or unnecessary interventions that may not be the best for you and your baby.

After completing this course, learners will be able to:

  • Discover how the Lamaze Six Healthy Birth Practices can simplify your labor and birth
  • Find out how your care provider and support team can make a difference
  • Learn about common medical interventions
  • Alleviate fears and learn ways to manage pain
  • Build your knowledge and confidence to make informed decisions

Breastfeeding Basics: From Birth to Back to Work

As comforting and healthy as breastfeeding can be, it is not always easy in the first few weeks while recovering from birth. If you find yourself struggling, know that hard work in the early weeks pays off as you and your baby learn to breastfeed. Having realistic expectations about how breastfeeding will go in the early weeks will help you to meet your breastfeeding goals. With the information in this class, you can prepare to get breastfeeding off to a great start and look forward to the many benefits that breastfeeding can provide to you and your baby.

After complete this class, learners will be able to:

  • Recognize the Benefits of Breastfeeding to Mother and Baby
  • Understand how milk supply works
  • Learn about the mechanics of breastfeeding, latch and positioning
  • Recognize good feeding and if baby is getting enough milk
  • Manage nighttime breastfeeding
  • Be prepared for what to do if there is a recommendation to supplement/pump
  • Prepare for returning to work

VBAC: Informed and Ready

This class will help you understand the facts, benefits, and risks of all your delivery options including a vaginal birth after cesarean (VBAC), and set you up for the best chance of success. Prepare yourself and learn how to simplify your labor and birth by participating in this interactive online course.

After completing this class, learners will be able to:

  • Understand the risks and benefits of both VBAC and repeat cesarean birth
  • Recognize the qualities of a VBAC supportive health care provider
  • Identify a strong support team for your  VBAC birth
  • Develop and practice coping and comfort techniques that will help during your VBAC labor
  • Write a VBAC and cesarean birth plan that reflects your informed preferences

International Cesarean Awareness Network (ICAN) has collaborated with Lamaze International to offer all ICAN members a 15% discount on the VBAC class, to help them feel better prepared as they plan for their subsequent birth after a cesarean.  To learn more about ICAN and become a member, in order to take advantage of this discount, follow the link to the “Join ICAN page.”

Additional courses planned include “Labor Pain Management: Techniques for Comfort and Coping” -scheduled to go live next month and an early pregnancy class in the early part of 2015.

Offering online classes serves to increase name recognition of the Lamaze International brand and create demand for in person Lamaze classes offered by LCCEs around the world.  Programs like this position Lamaze as the leader in childbirth education. Additionally, families that do not have Lamaze educators in their community can take advantage of the evidence based information and skills offered in the classes.  Educators can follow the class links above and sample all of the courses in a preview segment.

Breastfeeding, Cesarean Birth, Childbirth Education, Healthy Birth Practices, Lamaze International, Pain Management , , , , , ,

New Lamaze International Epidural Infographic – Information, Not Judgment

November 4th, 2014 by avatar

Lamaze_EpiduralInfographic_FINALAs a follow up to Henci Goer’s recent analysis of the the Cochrane Systematic Review of the just released epidural study – Early versus late initiation of epidural analgesia for labour,  I wanted to share the newest Lamaze International infographic “Is An Epidural My Only Option?” geared for expectant families.  This fact sheet provides information not only about the epidural, it shares the risks and benefits.  The infographic discusses how to reduce risks and improve outcomes when laboring people choose to use one, such as trying other things first before asking for an epidural and changing positions frequently after the epidural is administered.

Additionally, there are several suggestions for alternatives to an epidural, which some people may find really helps to minimize pain, including using a doula for labor and birth support.  Encouraging families to ask questions about alternatives of their health care providers, choosing a facility that supports alternative forms of pain relief and discussing with their partners how the partner can help them to cope during labor.

I really appreciate the strong encouragement for families to take a Lamaze Childbirth Class in order to learn more about labor and birth and the coping skills that can promote a safe and health birth for mother and baby.  My childbirth classes are chock full of positions, techniques and tips to help reduce pain, maximize comfort and promote normal birth.  We thoroughly cover pain medication options as well, and families leave confident that they can effectively ask for and receive the information they need to make a decision about what, if any, medications they will choose during labor to help with pain.

I invite you to head over and check out the new epidural infographic, consider sharing the print or electronic version and checking out all the wonderful Lamaze resources on the website for educators.  Your students and clients can find the same information on the parent site!

Which infographic is your favorite? Which one do you use and refer to most frequently?  Let us know in the comments section below.

 

Childbirth Education, Medical Interventions, Push for Your Baby , , ,

October is SIDS Awareness Month – Educators Can Share Information to Help Families Reduce Risk!

October 28th, 2014 by avatar

Safe to Sleep®SIDS PreventionOctober has been designated as a time to observe some solemn occasions that may affect families during pregnancy, birth and postpartum.  This month, Science & Sensibility has previously covered Pregnancy and Infant Loss Awareness Month in two previous posts here and here.  Today I would like to recognize that October is also SIDS Awareness Month.

As childbirth educators, part of our curriculum for expecting parents includes discussing SIDS, providing an explanation of what it is (and what it isn’t)  and how to reduce the risk of a SIDS death.

What is SIDS?

Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) is defined as the sudden death of an infant less than 1 year of age that cannot be explained after a thorough investigation is conducted that includes a complete autopsy, examination of the death scene, and a review of the medical history. SIDS is the leading cause of death for infants aged 1 to 12 months in the United States.  About 2000 infants die every year in the USA from SIDS. African American and American Indian/Alaskan Native babies are twice as likely to die of SIDS as white babies.

Most SIDS deaths occur in babies between 1 month and 4 months of age, and the majority (90%) of SIDS deaths occur before a baby reaches 6 months of age. However SIDS deaths can occur anytime during a baby’s first year. Slightly more boys die of SIDS than girls.

Since the USA introduced the Safe to Sleep® campaign (formerly known as the Back to Sleep Campaign) in 1994, the number of infants dying of SIDS has dropped by 50%.

What SIDS is not

  • SIDS is not suffocation nor is it caused by suffocation
  • Vaccines and immunizations do not cause SIDS
  • SIDS is not a result of choking or vomiting
  • SIDS is not caused by neglect or child abuse
  • SIDS is not contagious
  • SIDS is not caused by strangulation

What causes SIDS?

While the cause of SIDS is not known, there is more and more evidence that infants who die from SIDS have brain abnormalities that interfere with how the brain communicates with the parts of the nervous system that control breathing, heart rate, blood pressure, waking from sleep, temperature and other things.  More information on what researchers are finding as they work to identify the cause of SIDS can be found here.

What are the risk factors for SIDS?

There are several risk factors that put babies at higher risk of SIDS.  Childbirth educators should be providing this information to families during class. These risk factors include:

  • Being put to sleep on their stomachs
  • Being put to sleep on couches, chairs, or other soft surfaces or under soft coverings
  • Being too hot during sleep
  • Being put to sleep on or under soft or loose bedding
  • Being exposed to smoke in utero, or second hand cigarette smoke in the home or car, or the second hand smoke of care-givers or family.
  • Sleeping in an adult bed with parents, other children or pets especially if:
    • Bed-sharing with an adult who smokes, recently had alcohol or is tired
    • Sleeping with more than one bed sharer
    • Covered by a blanket or a quilt
    • Younger than 14 weeks of age

NOTE: If families in your classes are going to be bed-sharing with their infants, (which sometimes is the reality for new parents getting accustomed to life with baby) it is important for you to provide information about what safe bed sharing looks like.  I recommend “Sharing Sleep with Your Baby” by Robin Elise Weiss for resources to share on this topic.

What reduces the risks of SIDS?

New parents can do many things to reduce the risk of their infant dying from SIDS.  You can share this information with your classes.   These risk reductions include:

  • Always place a baby to sleep on his/her back
  • Have the baby sleep on a firm sleep surface (Not a carseat, bouncy seat or swing as your baby’s normal sleep spot.)
  • No crib bumpers, toys, soft objects, or sleep positioning products (even if they claim to reduce the risk of SIDS) in the baby’s sleep space
  • Breastfeed the baby
  • Room sharing with the baby
  • Have regular prenatal care during pregnancy
  • Mothers who refrain from smoking, drinking alcohol or using illicit drugs during pregnancy and after the baby is born
  • Do not allow second hand smoke around the baby or have caregivers or family members who smoke around the baby
  • Once breastfeeding and milk supply is firmly established and baby is gaining weight appropriately, offer a pacifier (not on a string) when baby goes down for their last sleep.
  • Do not overdress the baby for bed or overheat the room
  • Maintain all the healthy baby checkups and vaccines as recommended by the baby’s health care provider
  • Do not use home breathing monitors or heart monitors that claim to reduce the risk of SIDS.

Talking about difficult topics in a childbirth class can be hard for both the eductor and the families.  No one wants to think that the unthinkable might happen to them.  But sharing accurate facts about the risks and how to reduce those risks is an important part of any childbirth curriculum.  How and when do you discuss this topic in your classes?  Do you have a video or handout that you like to share?  Please let us know in the comments section, how you effectively cover SIDS topics in your childbirth classes.

Resources for professionals

Resources for parents and caregivers

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Babies, Breastfeeding, Childbirth Education, Newborns , , , , ,