Posts Tagged ‘Sharon Muza’

NICHD Seeking Beta Testers for PregSource Data Collection Tool

November 24th, 2015 by avatar

Become a PregSource Beta TesterLamaze International frequently collaborates with stakeholders, researchers and other organizations who share an interest in maternal child health and improving maternity care for families both in the USA and internationally.  As part of this collaboration, Lamaze International would like to ask for your help in recruiting pregnant people, people who were pregnant in the past year or even those who are thinking of becoming pregnant to participate as beta testers before the PregSource data collection tool is launched to the public.

The objective of PregSource: Crowdsourcing to Understand Pregnancy (PregSource) is to better understand the range of physical and emotional experiences and alterations in behavior that women have during pregnancy and after giving birth, the impact of these experiences on women’s lives, and the perinatal challenges encountered by special sub-populations of women.

To advance these efforts, here is a some wording that you can use to invite class members, clients and patients to participate in the PregSource beta testing.  You are free to use this letter as is, or modify to suite your needs.  This would be a great news tidbit to include in your regular e-news, social media postings and share with your classes.

The information obtained from this study will be helpful in improving prenatal care for women.  Help Lamaze International and their research partners to successfully test this program.  Your effort is greatly appreciated.

Sample Letter

Lamaze International is partnering with Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), part of the National Institutes of Health, on a project called PregSource. PregSource is a crowdsourcing research effort that aims to improve understanding of the range of physical and emotional experiences that women have during pregnancy and after giving birth.

Because PregSource relies on crowdsourcing, we will be gathering information directly from pregnant women themselves, asking them to enter information about their pregnancies and the health of their babies into online questionnaires. Women who use PregSource can view how their responses compare to other PregSource participants, print or email reports to share with their health care team, and receive information from trusted sources on pregnancy-related issues.

PregSource is currently looking for beta testers to help ensure that the online platform is appropriate and that it is working correctly. If you or someone you know is pregnant, thinking about becoming pregnant, or were pregnant in the last year—we want YOU! Your assistance is critical to ensuring that PregSource can meet its goals. Please note that for the pregnant beta testers, we will need to verify some of the information using a copy of their medical records. We are committed to keeping all personal information secure and will destroy the medical record as soon as we have verified the information.

 If you are interested, please send your name, stage of pregnancy (or if already delivered) and email address to the NICHD at PregSource@nih.gov

We value your participation and your interest in helping us launch PregSource.

Childbirth Education, Lamaze International, Research, Research Opportunities , , ,

Series: Brilliant Activities for Birth Educators – Events of Late Pregnancy and Premature Birth

November 19th, 2015 by avatar

PlaybillNovember is Prematurity Awareness Month and November 17th was World Prematurity Awareness Day. This month’s Brilliant Activities for Birth Educators post is about preventing prematurity, the events of late pregnancy and the importance of waiting for labor to begin on its own. As they do every year, the March of Dimes leads the way in recognizing the importance of preventing premature births. They have provided information and resources to bring this important problem to light.  The number one cause of death of young children worldwide is complications from being born too early, with estimates of 1.1 million deaths directly linked to being born too early.   In the United States, one in ten babies are born premature.  If you live in the USA, you can check out how your state has performed on the prematurity report card.  On the international level, you can find out how your country ranks here.  In the US, we also know that premature births and low birth weight babies are more likely to occur in families of color.

I cover premature birth in my childbirth classes in many ways, including recognizing the signs of premature labor, and facilitating a discussion around the Lamaze Healthy Birth Practice “Let Labor Begin On Its Own” as induction before a baby is ready and has started labor can unintentionally result in a premature birth if the gestational age is estimated incorrectly or even if the baby was not ready and needed some more time in utero.  Not every baby is ready to be born at the same time.

My favorite activity to do in class on this topic leaves families really understanding the benefits of letting baby start labor when they are ready (in the absence of medical complications).  In small groups – the families prepare and present a short skit on the events of late pregnancy.

When this is activity is done in class

I cover this information on week two of a seven week series, at the beginning of class.  The families are just beginning to gel and we have done quite a bit of interactive learning the week before, on class one, but this is definitely a leap of faith on their part to be doing such a “daring” activity at the start of the second class.  They have only been with me and their classmates for one 2.5 hour session.  I am asking a lot of them, but they always rise to the challenge.

© Penny Simkin

© Penny Simkin

How I introduce the topic and set up the activity

I hand out Penny Simkin’s “Events of Late Pregnancy” information sheet that is available for purchase as a tear pad from PennySimkin.com. I discuss how both pregnant person and baby are getting ready for birth in the last weeks of a pregnancy.  Many different processes are happening and systems are moving forward to have everything culminate and coordinate in the labor and birth.  Each and every process is critical to a healthy baby and a body that is ready for labor.  I divide the class into four groups and assign each group to be either a Pregnant Person, Uterus, Fetus, or the Placenta/Membranes.  I ask them to collaborate together and prepare a skit, activity, active presentation, interpretive dance, charade etc., that shares information on the changes their assigned role undergoes during the last weeks of pregnancy and through labor.  I give them around five minutes to prepare and offer to provide any props that they might need from my teaching supplies.  They gather their groups, take their tear sheet and head to four corners of the classroom to get to work.

The results of their creativity

After the small group work is completed, we gather back as a class and get ready for the “show.”  In turn, each group (and their chosen props) heads to the front of the room to do their presentation.  Everyone follows along with their info sheet.  The results are outstanding and usually quite comically.

Some of the most memorable presentations have included a newscaster holding a microphone and interviewing the fetus at different gestational ages.

Newscaster: “Hello 34 week old fetus, can you tell me what you are working on now?”

Fetus: “Well, this week, I am taking on iron and my mother’s antibodies. I need the iron to help me through my first six months and the antibodies protect me until I can make my own. ”


© Anne Geddes and March of Dimes

Other groups have created a giant pelvis with their bodies and had a “baby” assume the birth position and move through.  I recall a group ripped up red paper into confetti, and released it from up high to represent bloody show.  Just this week, one group did a hip hop dance and chanted along with the different events.  “Antibodies” have leapt through “placentas,” and fake breasts have leaked colostrum.  Giant uteri have contracted and pushed babies out.  One week, uncoordinated contractions representing Braxton-Hicks contractions “squeezed” out of sync and then got “organized” and worked in unison to represent labor contractions getting longer, stronger and closer together, flexing and squeezing like a well fabricated machine. I am continually amazed at the creativity and ingenuity of the results.  Everyone laughs and best of all, the events are memorable and easy to recall.


After each group has a chance to present their section, we debrief and discuss any questions.  We bring things full circle by talking about what the impact might be for a premature birth or a birth that occurs before the baby or parent’s body is ready.  Everyone is clear that the process of birth and the transition that baby needs to make works best when baby chooses their birth day.  We admire everyone’s creativity and laugh about the mad skills that the class has!  As the series continues, I can refer back to these skits and remind them of the important steps as they come up again in class.  I am amazed that they have great recall of the progression.

What the families say about the activity

After we have finished, the feedback I receive on this activity is great!  Despite their initial hesitancy to get so far out of their comfort zone, families really remember the events, recognize how important the changes are that occur in the pregnant parent, the uterus, the baby and the placenta and membranes. They can clearly articulate why it is important to reduce the chance of a premature baby and wait for labor to start on its own.  The unique presentations really make things memorable and the families report back to me weeks later, or even at the class reunion after birth, how they often thought of this activity and it helped them to have patience to wait for baby to come.  They knew good (and important) things were happening in the last few weeks that would make for a healthy birth and baby.

How do you teach about preventing premature birth and the importance of waiting until baby starts labor?  What interactive teaching ideas do you use?  Do you think that you might try something like this in your childbirth classes?  How might you modify it.  Share your thoughts in the comments below.  I would love to hear from you.

Babies, Childbirth Education, Healthy Birth Practices, Lamaze International, Newborns, Pre-term Birth, Series: Brilliant Activities for Birth Educators , , , , ,

Meet Maria Brooks – New President of Lamaze International

November 17th, 2015 by avatar

“A Lamaze educator is able to anticipate a need that you may have before you experience it. She can tailor your class to help you navigate obstacles that are unique to your health and choice of birth location.”  – Maria Brooks, President, Lamaze International

maria brooks headshot 2015This fall, Maria Brooks, BSN, RNC-OB, LCCE, FACCE moved into the position of President of the Board of Directors and began serving her one year term leading our organization.  Maria (pronounced “Mah-rye-ah”) has been serving on the BoD since 2012 and also serves on the Lamaze ITS Steering Committee and Lamaze Membership Committee.  Maria is an L&D nurse at Pennsylvania Hospital in Philadelphia.  While I have known Maria for several years, I recently connected to ask some questions on behalf of Science & Sensibility readers.  I know that all of our Board works very hard on behalf of educators and parents.  Please join me in congratulating Maria and welcoming her into her new position. .

Sharon Muza: What are some of the opportunities and challenges that face our organization currently and what plan do you and the board have to meet these challenges?

Maria Brooks:  Exaggerated fears around pregnancy and childbirth have already taken hold in many women by the time they reach our educators. One of the ways Lamaze is trying to help make a difference is developing a para-professional community trainer/model for Lamaze education. A Lamaze peer educator program is an opportunity for Lamaze International to promote evidence-based healthy behaviors before, during, and after pregnancy among 18-25 year old young adult women.  The peer educator program will be designed to train college-aged women using a scripted toolkit to disseminate information on the Lamaze Six Healthy Birth Practices.  The purpose of the peer educator program will be to share information to help young adult women to formulate accurate and confidence-building ideals about pregnancy, birth, and breastfeeding. We plan to pilot the program in the coming year.

“Maria brings a depth of advocacy skills and passion for reaching women and their families in diverse communities with Lamaze education and resources. I look forward to working with Maria, the Board of Directors, and volunteer leadership as we continue the meaningful work of advancing Lamaze’s strategic imperatives in the coming year.” – Linda Harmon, Executive Director, Lamaze International

SM: When you think of the many recent accomplishments of Lamaze International, what are a few that you are most proud of? Why?

MB: In the last few years, Lamaze has made it a priority to “create demand for our brand.” We want to meet women where they are – online! We have seen a tremendous growth in our reach through our expanded presence on social media by hosting monthly Twitter chats and creating content-rich infographics and videos to share via Facebook, Pinterest, our blogs, Twitter, and so much more.  These efforts have raised our social media presence and profile. Both Science & Sensibility and Giving Birth with Confidence have been recognized for their high-value content and have seen significant growth in reach over the past few years reaching more expectant parents and professionals with evidence-based information. That alone is a big success. We are lucky to have these blogs represent the mission and vision of Lamaze. Lamaze also invested in development of a mobile app for expecting families, Pregnancy to Parenting, to make Lamaze education resources easily accessible on the go, and as a resource for our educators to use in class.  

SM: Do you feel that Lamaze is recognized as a serious player amongst maternal infant health organizations?  If yes, what accomplishments have helped us to earn this position and a seat at the table working with other well known organizations to improve maternal and neonatal mortality and morbidity?

MB: Yes, Lamaze has had a seat at the table with other maternity care players.  A recent example was being tapped this past year to work with National Institute of Child and Health Development (NICHD) and other key maternity care groups on the development of a new pregnancy registry.  We also have plans to host a Roundtable discussion on childbirth education with key stakeholders.  

Lamaze International offers the only childbirth educator certification program that has been accredited by an outside body, the National Commission for Certifying Agencies (NCCA),  which has reviewed and vetted the standards Lamaze employs in administering our certification exam.  Maintaining certification is equally important for ensuring LCCE educators stay up to date with the latest on evidence-based practices, adult education, teaching and advocacy strategies.

SM: What plans are in the works for the Lamaze International organization that will benefit families as they prepare to welcome a child?

MB: Quality childbirth education is still not available to many women. These are the very women who often have the poorest outcomes with the highest rates of unnecessary interventions. This has to change. If high-quality childbirth education was offered to all women no matter the social economic or educational background, this disparity will change. It is a priority to advocate for insurance coverage and reimbursement to pay for childbirth education. In March 2015 members of the board of directors met with legislators about the importance of all women receiving childbirth education. Currently the Affordable Healthcare Act allows enrollment at the time of birth.  We asked legislators to change the life event designation to pregnancy, to allow childbirth education to be a part of prenatal care and covered by health care insurance. We still have a lot of work to do but this initial step into policy advocacy is a positive move in the right direction.

Hear Maria talk about her birth experience in Lamaze International’s “Push for Your Baby” video.

SM: What about plans and programs for educators?  What can members expect to see from Lamaze during your term that will benefit LCCEs and offer opportunities for those that teach?

MB: Lamaze offers LCCE members a rich array of evidence-based resources to support their professional development, such as regular webinars on current hot topics, The Journal of Perinatal Education with home study modules, the new Business Toolkit and Social Media Guide.  The organization has also invested in developing teaching tools to support Lamaze educators, including the Lamaze Toolkit for Childbirth Educators, infographics, the new mobile app, online parenting classes to supplement in person classes.

SM: As both a Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator and a L&D Nurse, do you find it necessary to keep both roles separate and wear two hats?  Is there any overlap?  What challenges do you face because of your dual roles?

MB: I love the opportunity to wear both hats, and I am very lucky to work in an environment that looks positively on the Lamaze Six Healthy Birth Practices. So no, the two roles do not conflict but each does sharpen the other. As a nurse, a large part of my job is to educate my patients and to help them make informed decisions about their health care. As a LCCE educator, I’m fortunate to have more time to build a relationship and rapport with my students before the actual birth day, but as a nurse, my “classroom” looks a bit different. It may be in triage when I have a mom begging to stay when she is in early labor or not in labor at all. I take that time to let her know the importance of waiting on labor and how every day counts for that little person growing inside her. Or it might be in the labor room with a family who for whatever reason did not take a childbirth preparation class and needs help knowing how to comfort their partner or friend. I spend time helping new mothers to see how powerful they are and how smart their babies are. I also find myself in a special place to help teach my fellow nurses non-pharmacological pain management, allowing them to also feel empowered to work with these families. And of course, I encourage my colleagues to become LCCE certified themselves. I’ve never felt more at home than when wearing both ”hats”.

SM: Why should families continue to attend in person classes when so many online options exist and the internet offers a multitude of learning opportunities and virtually unlimited information for the pregnant person and their family?

MB: The internet has a lot to offer and can be a great complement to a classroom, but nothing replaces a quality in-person class. A Lamaze educator is able to anticipate a need that you may have before you experience it. She can tailor your class to help you navigate obstacles that are unique to your health and choice of birth location. Being face to face with other families also gives an opportunity to  build relationships that grow deeper as your family evolves. Some of my best friends today I met in my Lamaze class. We shared a chuckle not long ago that the person in the class that asked the most questions is now the President of Lamaze!

SM: Tell us something unusual about you that we might never know!

MB: I am a classically trained actor and dancer and worked as a stage actor in New York City for over ten years.

Childbirth Education, Healthy Birth Practices, Lamaze International, Lamaze News, Push for Your Baby , , , , , ,

Lamaze Parent Satisfaction Survey Will Benefit Families – Educators Play a Key Role in Increasing Response Rate

November 3rd, 2015 by avatar

VoteSurveyParticipation at in-person childbirth education classes has been on the decline in past years.  There has not been much research on the benefits of taking a childbirth class, and with the plethora of information available online, it is no surprise that enrollment may very well be on the decline.  At the same time, cesarean rates and obstetrical interventions have overall been increasing.  Maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality rates have not been improving either.

In the 2013 Listening to Mothers  (LtM) III report, 59% of all first time mothers took childbirth classes, compared with 70% in the 2002 LtM I report.  In 2013, 17% of experienced mothers took classes, down from 19% in 2002 (Declercq, 2013, Declercq 2002).

Lamaze International, with its diverse and experienced team of Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educators, is in a unique position to collect data on the experiences of parents who take Lamaze childbirth classes and utilize Lamaze International resources.  The Lamaze staff and Board of Directors have developed and initiated a Parent Satisfaction Survey that can be filled out by families who have completed a Lamaze class.  The survey is meant to be completed after the birth of their baby, so that the information can be used to determine how their Lamaze class impacted their actual choices and experience.

The information being collected in this Parent Satisfaction Survey can play a key role in helping to:

Understand the impact of Lamaze classes

Data collected through these surveys can be used to understand the impact of Lamaze classes on families and birth outcomes and guide further research on this topic. Exploring this area of research can help Lamaze and other organizations to access funding to further develop and continue studying this important topic

Lobby for improved access

Information gained through these post-birth surveys  can be used to educate lawmakers on the outcomes of births when families participated in birth classes and encourage legislators to offer reimbursement and increased access for childbirth education classes across all socioeconomic and ethnic categories. Lamaze International plans to repeat their “Hill Day” campaign and lobby Congressmen/women in early spring of 2016 by visiting them in their D.C. offices and sharing information about maternal infant health and outcomes experienced by parents and infants during the childbearing year.

Improve information and educational materials

The results of the survey can help Lamaze International to be sure their message is on target and their educational materials are effective in sharing information on best practices, evidence based care and informed consent and refusal.  Lamaze can continue to develop curriculum and services that help families to “Push for Their Baby” during pregnancy, birth and postpartum.

Help LCCEs to deliver education

Every childbirth educator’s goal is to communicate important information to expectant families through engaging and effective activities.  Aggregated survey information can help Lamaze International provide information and direction to all the LCCEs so that they can assess how they can continue to provide valuable and useful information to the families participating in their Lamaze classes.

Share the message with other stakeholders

Information gleaned from the survey will be shared with policymakers and key third-party organization stakeholders at upcoming roundtables that Lamaze representatives facilitate in and host.  It is important for health care providers, hospital administrators and maternal infant health organizations to recognize how effective Lamaze childbirth classes can be be in creating a safe and healthy birth for participating families.

Linda Harmon, Lamaze International’s Executive Director took a moment recently to answer some questions about the Parent Satisfaction Survey.

Sharon Muza:  There is not a lot of research available on the effectiveness of childbirth/Lamaze classes.  Do you feel this information could be used as the basis of that research?

 Linda Harmon: Lamaze has commissioned a White Paper which will present the evidence related to childbirth interventions overuse in the US hospital system, and the effects they can have on childbirth outcomes, and present the argument that evidence-based prenatal education is a critical avenue for women when making childbirth care decisions.  The parent satisfaction survey will support this research by providing data from the parents who have used Lamaze resources.

SM: How could the information gained from this survey be used to further reimbursement for families who take childbirth classes?

LH: Data gained from the Lamaze Parent Satisfaction Survey will be used to provide important insights about the impact of Lamaze childbirth education on the experiences and outcomes of pregnant women and their babies. These insights will provide valuable information to support discussions with healthcare insurers, hospitals and other strategic partners to advance Lamaze education.  Preliminary data from the Lamaze national parent satisfaction survey shows that women engaged with Lamaze have a cesarean rate of 20%. That’s about 13% less than the national cesarean rate of 33%.  If a 13% reduction in cesarean could be translated across the U.S., the potential cost savings would be nearly $4.7 billion annually.

SM: Lamaze International is an international leader in childbirth education and offers a great curriculum filled with best practice and evidence based information.  Have initial survey responses indicated that our classes have been a useful component for families welcoming a child?

LH: The preliminary data is very positive, but we need substantially more parent survey responses to  validate general trends. In the initial review of survey findings in March 2015,  we compared what women told us in the Lamaze survey with what women reported in the highly-respected national survey Listening to Mothers III: Pregnancy and Birth.  Early survey responses show that 94% of women taking Lamaze classes say that education provided by Lamaze improved their childbirth experience and 91% feel well informed about decisions in labor and birth.

You Can Help Advocate for Childbirth Education

Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educators play a key role in getting the word out to the families who participate in their classes.  Through information received from you, families can be directed to the survey and asked to participate.  During the online survey, participants are asked a handful of simple questions that seek to learn if childbirth education improved their birth experience.

Lamaze has put together many resources for LCCE educators to help you understand the importance of this survey.  These resources include:

  • An FAQ to help you become familiar with the survey and encourage you to participate.
  • How to introduce the survey in class – We have created sample messages and instructions for  encouraging your students to sign up for the survey
  • Promote the survey – We have developed a sample email you can send your class, introducing them to the survey, as well as sample Facebook, Twitter and blog posts.

Every family that participates in the survey will receive a coupon for a discount on a Lamaze toy.

Win a 2016 Lamaze International conference registration

If you encourage participation, you will be entered to win a complimentary Lamaze International 2016 Annual Conference registration. If your name is referenced as their childbirth educator in the survey, you will be entered in the drawing—and the more your name is referenced, the more entries you will have!  This is a real bonus reason to share the survey with parents, even beyond the benefits to research and programs. 

 Are you already encouraging your families to take the Parent Satisfaction Survey?  Share your experiences in the comments section.  If you have not yet begun to communicate information to your families about the survey, I hope that you will reconsider as you recognize the importance of your role in collecting this valuable data.


Declercq, E. R., Sakala, C., Corry, M. P., Applebaum, S., & Herrlich, A. (2013). Listening to Mothers III: Pregnancy and Birth; Report of the Third National US Survey of Women’s Childbearing Experiences. New York, NY: Childbirth Connection.

Declercq, E. R., Sakala, C., Corry, M. P., Applebaum, S., & Risher, P. (2002). Listening to mothers: Report of the first national US survey of women’s childbearing experiences. New York.

Babies, Cesarean Birth, Childbirth Education, Lamaze International, Lamaze News, New Research , , , , , ,

Time for ACOG and ASA to Change Their Guidelines! Eating and Drinking in Labor Should Not Be Restricted

October 27th, 2015 by avatar

“…The problem for anesthesiologists is that our practice guidelines on obstetric anesthesia are strongly worded, and state that women can not eat during labor. We can’t ethically design a large enough study to answer this question, so we will have to wait for expert opinion to change.” – Paloma Toledo, MD

Screenshot 2015-10-26 17.04.39Social media was all abuzz yesterday about information coming out of the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) conference currently being held in San Diego, CA. Headlines everywhere screamed “Eating During Labor May Not Be So Bad, Study Suggests,” “Light Meal During Labor May Be Safe for Most Women,” and “Eating During Labor Is Actually Fine For Most Women.”  People chortled over the good news and bumped virtual fists over the internet celebrating this information.

The ASA released a press release highlighting a poster being presented at the ASA conference by two Memorial University medical students, Christopher Harty and Erin Sprout. Memorial University is located in St. Johns, Newfoundland, Canada. When a professional conference is being held, several press releases are published every day to advise both professionals and the public about news and information related to the conference. This was one of many released yesterday.

The student researchers suggested in their poster presentation that it may be time for a policy change. Their research indicated that, according to the ASA database, there has only been one case of aspiration during labor and delivery in the period between 2005 and 2013. That aspiration situation occurred in a woman with several other obstetrical complications. “…aspiration today is almost nonexistent, especially in healthy patients,” the researchers stated. The research was extensive – examining 385 studies published since 1990. Much of the research available supported the findings in the poster presentation/study.

The current policy of the ASA on oral intake in labor is that laboring women should avoid solid food in labor. You can read the ASA’s most current guidelines, published in 2007: Practice Guidelines for Obstetric Anesthesia An Updated Report by the American Society of Anesthesiologists Task Force on Obstetric Anesthesia.  The American College of Nurse Midwives recommends “that women at low risk for pulmonary aspiration be permitted self-determined intake according to guidelines established by the practice setting.” They also conclude “drinking and eating during labor can provide women with the energy they need and should not be routinely restricted.”  American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommends no solid food for laboring women and refers to the ASA guidelines.

I connected with Paloma Toledo, MD, an obstetrical anesthesiologist who is attending the ASA conference in San Diego to ask her what her thoughts were on this new research. “General anesthesia is becoming increasingly rare, so fewer women are at risk for aspiration, since most women will have neuraxial anesthesia for unplanned cesarean deliveries. The question is, is eating in labor unsafe? They do allow a light meal in the UK, studies have shown that eating does not adversely affect labor outcomes, and in the CEMACE data, despite allowing women to eat in the UK, there have not been deaths related to aspiration. I think a lot of women want to move away from the medicalized childbirth and have a more natural experience. Women want to eat, and I believe the midwife community has been encouraging eating in labor. The problem for anesthesiologists is that our practice guidelines on obstetric anesthesia are strongly worded, and state that women can not eat during labor. We can’t ethically design a large enough study to answer this question, so we will have to wait for expert opinion to change.”

Lamaze International released an infographic in July, 2014 covering this very topic. “No Food, No Drink During Labor? No Way!” and I covered this in a Science & Sensibility post sharing more details.  You can find all the useful infographics available for downloading, sharing and printing here.  Additionally, the fourth Healthy Birth Practice speaks to avoiding routine interventions that are not medically necessary, and it has long been clear that restricting food and drink in labor is certainly an intervention that should not be imposed.

It is important for birth professionals to recognize what the American Society for Anesthesiologists’ press release is and what it is not. We must not overstate the information that they have shared. Please be aware that this is not a policy change.

Hopefully, this will be a call to action by the ASA to examine the contemporary research and determine that that their existing guidelines are outdated and do not serve laboring and birthing people well, nor reflect current research.

Childbirth educators and others can continue to share what the evidence says about the safety and benefit of oral nutrition during labor and encourage families to request best practice from their healthcare providers and if that is not possible, to consider changing to a provider who can support evidence based care.


American College of Nurse-Midwives, (2008). Providing Oral Nutrition to Women in Labor.Journal of Midwifery & Women’s Health53(3), 276-283.

American Society of Anesthesiologists Task Force on Obstetric Anesthesia. (2007). Practice guidelines for obstetric anesthesia: an updated report by the American Society of Anesthesiologists Task Force on Obstetric Anesthesia.Anesthesiology106(4), 843.

Committee on Obstetric Practice. (2009). ACOG Committee Opinion No. 441: Oral intake during labor. Obstetrics and gynecology114(3), 714.

Singata M, Tranmer J, Gyte GML. Restricting oral fluid and food intake during labour. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 8. Art. No.: CD003930. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD003930.pub3.

Childbirth Education, Do No Harm, Evidence Based Medicine, Healthy Birth Practices, Lamaze International, Medical Interventions, Research , , , , , , , ,

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