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Lamaze International Wants to Recognize Childbirth Education Leaders! Submit Your Nominations Now!

May 21st, 2015 by avatar

NominateDid you know that Lamaze International has several different awards that are given during the annual conference to recognize the contributions of deserving individuals to the field of childbirth education?  There are a total of four awards available, read about all four and consider if you have someone deserving of a nomination.

The Lamaze International Elisabeth Bing Award recognizes a Lamaze certified childbirth educator (LCCE)  who has “made outstanding contributions in the field of childbirth education.”  With Elisabeth’s passing late last week, after a long and productive life as the pioneer of childbirth educators, this award will be extra poignant in 2015.  Can you think of an educator who has achieved national or international recognition, embodies the principles of Lamaze International and has made positive contributions to the field of childbirth education? This year’s recipient will be joining prestigious past winners.  Please consider nominating a deserving educator so that they can be considered for this year’s award.

The Lamaze International Research Award is to honor the person or organization whose research has significantly contributed to the field of childbirth education and normal birth.  This award recognizes and encourages the need for ongoing research in the field of childbirth education to support the evidence-based content of Lamaze education and information.

The Lamaze International President’s Award is given at the discretion of the President to an individual or organization that embodies the spirit of the Lamaze mission and vision, and has made significant contributions to advancing safe and healthy pregnancy, birth and early parenting through evidence-based education and advocacy.

The Lamaze International Media Award is for Lamaze International to honor individuals or organizations that present normal, physiologic birth and/or Lamaze International in a positive light in the mass media. Can you think of a blogger or journalist who has worked hard to provide both consumers and professionals with accurate information on current best practice?  If so, consider nominating him or her to be considered for this award.

In order to nominate an individual or an organization for any of the above awards, please submit the nomination through our online form.  We ask you to also email a copy of the nominee’s CV/resume.  The Executive Committee will review the nominations in each category and select the award recipients.

The awards are presented at the annual conference, this year to be held September 17-21, 2015 in Las Vegas, Nevada.  Recipients are informed in advance so they may plan on being in attendance to receive their award. The deadline is June 1st, so don’t delay in submitting the names of deserving individuals.

Registration is now open for the conference, so take advantage of early registration savings by registering now.

 

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Elisabeth Bing, Mother of Lamaze, Remembered for Humanizing Childbirth

May 18th, 2015 by avatar

“I hope I have made women aware that they have choices, they can get to know their body and trust their body.”

 

Elisabeth Bing, 1914-2015, Co-Founder of Lamaze International

elisabethbingElisabeth Bing, known as the “mother of Lamaze” passed away on Friday, May 15th, 2015 in her home in New York City, NY a few weeks shy of her 101st  birthday.  Elisabeth, along with Marjorie Karmel, founded Lamaze International (then known as The American Society for Psychoprophylaxis in Obstetrics/Lamaze, or ASPO/Lamaze) 55 years ago.  Her legacy lives on, not only in the numerous books she authored, (Six Practical Lessons for an Easier Childbirth, her most well known book, first published in 1967) but in each one of us, especially Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educators, who have been helping women and families for decades to be “aware that they have choices, they can get to know their body and trust their body.”

There are many resources (see links below) written that document Elisabeth’s life, her journey from Germany, to England and then finally the USA, where she established a groundbreaking childbirth education program at Mt. Sinai Hospital in Manhattan.  I didn’t want to rewrite what has already been documented.  I encourage you to read them as they are both fascinating and factual, documenting the magnificent achievements of a life committed to improving birth for women and babies.

Teaching in Studio, 1978 © Lamaze

 

I wanted to share information about Elisabeth that has not already been shared. I never had the honor of meeting Elisabeth Bing, nor hearing her speak, so I wanted to ask some of the women and leaders of Lamaze International to share what Elisabeth was like from their own personal experiences with this icon of childbirth education. I wanted to know how she influenced their lives and their careers, and to learn more about who she was and what she was like.  I also wanted to share this information with you.  Please join me in, as these women share their thoughts and memories.

Judith Lothian, PhD, RN, LCCE, FACCE, Chairperson of the Lamaze Certification Council Governing Body, Associate Editor of the Journal of Perinatal Education and co-author of The Official Lamaze Guide: Giving Birth with Confidence

Mary Jo Podgurski, RNC, EdD, LCCE, FACCE, Past President of Lamaze International

Robin Elise Weiss, PhD, MPH, LCCE, FACCE, author and current Lamaze International President

Linda Harmon, MPH, Executive Director of Lamaze International

Sharon Muza: Do you remember the first time you met Elisabeth? Can you share the details of that meeting and your first impressions?

Linda Harmon: I met Elisabeth for the first time at the annual conference over twenty years ago. I was meeting the “mother of Lamaze”. She was gracious and warm, and took the time and interest to get to know me personally. It was always special to have a few moments with Elisabeth at the conference for many years after our first meeting all those years ago.

© Librado Romero/The New York Times

© Librado Romero/The New York Times

Robin Elise Weiss: The first time I actually saw Elisabeth in person was at a conference in Chicago. I was coming down the escalator and I looked over at the fountain and she caught my eye. She was sitting there with Sheila Kitzinger, and all I could think was “Wow what an amazing woman. And two great legends sitting together just as simple as could be, not even understanding the impact that they’ve had on my life.

Mary Jo Podgurski: I’d always admired Elisabeth from afar, hanging onto her every word during her talks and taking an occasional picture with her at a conference. I clearly recall when we first spent time together. I was elected to the Lamaze board in 1994. Elisabeth asked me to meet with her. She engaged me in conversation about so many things – my passion for working with teens, my personal belief system, my family, my values, my experiences with birthing women, my own births – I realized I was being vetted. She was wise, she listened to hear, and she was visionary. She became my mentor. In time we became close personal friends.

Judith Lothian: I met Elisabeth in 1973. She interviewed me in her apartment…where she died…for the NYC Lamaze teacher training program. I was nervous. She was gracious and kind. I took the seminar later that year. In that same apartment. A group of about 8. It was wonderful. Take aways? They were the foundation for my career and life as a childbirth educator. “The breathing works because women make it their own in labor” There was nothing rigid about the way she taught the principles of the then “psychoprophylaxis”. And then began a 20 year journey where Elisabeth mentored me…she had me take over the teacher training program in NYC and then said “It’s time you went on to DC to the national organization”. I never would have done either without her literally telling me to do it. A wonderful mentor.

Dr. Marshall Klauss, Elisabeth Bing, Linda Harmon (L-R)

Dr. Marshall Klauss, Elisabeth Bing, Linda Harmon (L-R) 1996 © Lamaze

SM: When did you last meet/see/communicate with Elisabeth? Can you share those details?

JL: We did a video for the 50th anniversary of Lamaze. I spent a day with Elisabeth in her apartment. We shared memories and had tea together and she watched the taping and participated. It was an incredible day.

REW: One of the last times that I saw Elizabeth she was actually swimming in the ocean at the Fort Lauderdale Lamaze conference. All I could think was I hope I have that much spunk when I’m 90 years old.

LH: I remember visiting Elisabeth in her New York apartment when Lamaze had the opportunity to do a quick Lamaze lesson on the Regis and Kelly show. I got the grand tour which included her ground floor studio where she taught Lamaze classes for many years.

MJP: The last time we saw one another was her 100th birthday celebration in her apartment in NYC – July 8th, 2014. We last spoke at Christmas, 2014, when I sent her my usual present, a dozen red roses. She never failed to call and thank me, and then she always sent a thank you note. I treasure her notes. When I was in New York I always went to see her. I remember walking into her apartment about two years ago. When I entered, she looked up and said, “It’s my friend Mary Jo!”

Elisabeth with son Peter © Lamaze

Elisabeth with son Peter © Lamaze

SM: How would you describe Elisabeth’s personality and character?

MJP: Independent. Wise. Fiercely loyal. Kind. Intellectual. Curious. Gentle. Visionary. Strong-willed.

REW: I saw her as an amazing combination of feisty and sweet. She wouldn’t take no for an answer but you always left with a positive impression. She always made me feel like I was the only person she was talking to or cared about in the moment.

JL: Strong. Wise. Generous and kind.

SM: How do you think Elisabeth would want to be remembered?

LH: For starting what was at the time a radical consumer movement to improve birth for women and their partners, a legacy that has stood the test of time and continues to be relevant and important 55 years later.

MJP: As an advocate for birth and for women. As a musician and writer. As a mother. As a friend

JL: As someone who helped women give birth easily and simply.

SM: Of all the contributions Elisabeth has made to childbirth, both here in the USA, and abroad, what do you think is her greatest legacy?

MJP: Elisabeth modeled independence, strength and true advocacy. She empowered women. We (CBEs) are her legacy.

JL: Beginning, really, the movement to change birth in the US. She was at the forefront and gave women with her “Six Practical Lessons” a way to do it. Simply and easily. It may seem rigid and simplistic today but it worked then.

REW: Her greatest legacy will be the fact that women now have choices that were once not even considered possible. Many women do not know her name, but have her to thank for the options that they now have in childbirth.

SM: What advice would Elisabeth give to today’s pregnant person about their upcoming labor and birth?

MJP: One of the last things I remember her saying at a conference presentation was ‘Now, let’s take on the insurance companies’. I think Elisabeth would empower a pregnant person by sharing knowledge, speaking truth to power, and modeling courage. I think she’d say that the woman’s body knew how to give birth.

REW: Know your options. Fight for what works for you and your family.

SM: Do you have a favorite quote or story that Elisabeth said or shared with you and others? What might that be?

JL: Elisabeth in the 1970s was on a radio show with Dr. Bradley. She refused to talk about which “method” of childbirth was better. She said “Anything that helps women have good births is what is important”. I was impressed that she was not pushing Lamaze… but acknowledging women. She was gracious and kind always.

MJP: Once when we were discussing her youth in Germany and her time in England during the Blitz, she told me how she reacted to the bombings. She said that, at first, she went to the shelters with other people when the air raid sirens wailed. In time, she decided not to go. She said she wouldn’t die huddled below ground, but would continue doing whatever she was doing when the raid began. Those words resonated with me then, and echo for me now.  I visited her about six weeks after 9/11. She was calm and unafraid. I spoke with her as soon after the attacks as I could; she expressed no anxiety. Elisabeth showed me how to live with courage and well.

SM: Any other comments that you would like to share?

MJP: I loved Elisabeth Bing as a mentor, a true educator, a strong woman of integrity, but most of all, as my dear friend. I will always love and remember her.

Dr. Mary Jo Podgurski and  Elisabeth Bing 2014 © Podgurski

Dr. Mary Jo Podgurski and Elisabeth Bing 2014 © Podgurski

JL: I found Lamaze (ASPO) because I wanted a natural birth. But then I found Elisabeth when I wanted to teach classes and help women have the wonderful birth experience that I had. I had the privilege of being trained by her…and, contrary to all that is said about early Lamaze, there was nothing rigid about the what she taught or the way she taught. What I learned from Elisabeth was the foundation for all that I have done as a childbirth educator and nursing educator, and as an advocate for safe, health birth.. I am eternally grateful.

_____________________

Elisabeth Bing had a vision that there was a better way to give birth and she made that vision a reality through her books, the organization she founded (Lamaze International), the thousands upon thousands of families she taught, the relationships she forged with medical professionals, and the men and women she mentored, guided, supported and taught who have gone on to become childbirth educators themselves, carrying on the mission and vision. Elisabeth once said, “I hope I have made women aware that they have choices, they can get to know their body and trust their body.” I think, upon reflection, that we can all agree that Elisabeth Bing was beyond successful in this goal, and millions of families are grateful for her work and her effort.  I join Lamaze International and the Lamaze leaders, past and present, Lamaze Board of Directors and Staff, Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educators, readers of this blog and families everywhere in sending our deepest sympathies to Elisabeth’s family on the loss of their mother and family member.  We will forever be deeply indebted to her legacy.

Do you have memories of meeting Elisabeth Bing? Hearing her speak? Reading her books?  Please take a moment to share your thoughts and what her work meant to you in our comments section.  Thank you.

Books authored by Elisabeth Bing (incomplete list)

 

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Great Line-up of Plenary Conference Speakers and President’s Desk Updates

May 14th, 2015 by avatar

lamaze icea conf 2015Today on Science & Sensibility – news you can use!  Plenary speakers have been announced for the upcoming conference and Robin Elise Weiss, Lamaze International’s Board President has a new series of informative videos called “From the President’s Desk” that you will want to check out.  Read on for information on both of these topics.

Lamaze/ICEA Joint Conference News

Lamaze International and the International Childbirth Education Association (ICEA) just announced their plenary (general session) speaker line up for the joint Lamaze/ICEA 2015 conference at Planet Hollywood, Las Vegas on September 17-20.  Four speakers will address the entire conference in general sessions and I am very much looking forward to listening to their presentations along with the many concurrent sessions that will be offered over the four days of the conference.

ICEA and Lamaze celebrated their 50th anniversaries together in 2010 in Milwaukee, WI with a well attended “mega-conference” that had great energy and educational offerings and I expect that this conference will be just as big and wonderful.  Bringing together two leaders in childbirth education to hold a joint conference means that all attendees will benefit in numerous ways.

The theme of the Las Vegas conference is “Raising the Stakes for Evidence Based Practices & Education in Childbirth” and I know that educators, doctors, midwives, doulas, L&D nurses, IBCLCs and others will come together and take advantage of this joint conference to network, learn, receive contact hours, and socialize with other professionals.  Maybe, even win a little at the blackjack tables or take in a great show.  Las Vegas is a great venue for this conference, offering a wide variety of locales, activities and nightlife to enjoy outside of conference  hours.

This year’s plenary speakers

camman head shot 2015William Camann, MD
Director of Obstetric Anesthesia, Brigham and Women’s Hospital,  Associate Professor of Anesthesia, Harvard Medical School

Presentation: What does the informed childbirth educator need to know about labor pain relief in 2015?

 

 

combellick head shot 2015Joan Combellick, MSN, MPH,CM
PhD Student, NYU College of Nursing
Midwife, Hudson River Healthcare

Presentation: Watchful Waiting Revisited: Birth Experience and the Neonatal Microbiome

 

 

Joseph head shot 2015Jennie Joseph, LM, CPM
Co-Founder and Executive Director
Commonsense Childbirth School of Midwifery

Presentation:The Perinatal Revolution: Reducing Disparities and Saving Lives through Perinatal Education and Support

 

 

mcallister head shot 2015Elan McAllister
Founder, Choices in Childbirth

Presentation: No Day But Today

 

 

 

 

Concurrent sessions

Watch the website for soon to be released information on concurrent speakers and their topics.  Concurrent sessions will fall into one of four categories:

  • Evidence-Based Teaching and Practice
  • Using Technology and Innovation to Reach Childbearing and Breastfeeding Women
  • New and Emerging Research in the Field of Childbearing and Breastfeeding
  • Challenges of the Maternal Child Professional

Preconference workshops

Additionally, there will be two preconference workshops available for a small additional fee.  These 4 hour workshops allow you to really immerse yourself in the topic and leave with concrete skills applicable to your work with childbearing families.

  • Movement in Birth (AM)
  • Social Media Smarts: Strategic Online Marketing for the Busy Childbirth Professional (PM)

Early bird registration is open until August 1, 2015, so registering now allows you to save money on the conference fees and make your travel and hotel plans now.  Look for interviews with the plenary speakers over the next few months on Science & Sensibility.

 From the President’s Desk

Board President Robin Elise Weiss, Ph.D, has recently made a series of short and useful videos for Lamaze International on several topics.  The video series is called “From the President’s Desk”. Released to date are several on cesareans;

Robin’s newest video discusses the recently released ACOG committee opinion “Clinical Guidelines and Standardization of Practice to Improve Outcomes“. This video helps both birth professionals and consumers to understand how pushing for the best evidence based care can result in both pregnant people and their babies having improved outcomes.  ACOG wants to be able to offer best practice to those receiving care from its members, and consumers can help by sharing their desire to receive care in line with recommended guidelines.

Head over to Lamaze International’s YouTube Channel to see all the offerings, share the relevant videos with your students and clients and subscribe to the channel so that you don’t miss any of the releases.

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Celebrate International Day of the Midwife! ACOG Calls for Universal ICM Standards

May 5th, 2015 by avatar

Lamaze and Midwives IDM 2015Lamaze International and Science & Sensibility join with other partners around the world to celebrate International Day of the Midwife.  This global celebration is observed every year on May 5th and was officially recognized by the International Confederation of Midwives in 1992. (Read Judith Lothian’s report from the 2014 ICM Congress here.) This year’s theme is “The World Needs Midwives Today More Than Ever.”

Key midwifery concepts and model of care

Key midwifery concepts as defined by the International Confederation of Midwives describe the unique role that midwives have in providing care to women and families:

  • partnership with women to promote self-care and the health of mothers, infants, and families;
  • respect for human dignity and for women as persons with full human rights;
  • advocacy for women so that their voices are heard and their health care choices are respected;
  • cultural sensitivity, including working with women and health care providers to overcome those cultural practices that harm women and babies;
  • a focus on health promotion and disease prevention that views pregnancy as a normal life event;
  • advocacy for normal physiologic labour and birth to enhance best outcomes for mothers and infants.  (Fullerton, Thompson & Severino, 2011).

ACOG advocates universal standards

http://www.flickr.com/photos/eyeliam/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/eyeliam/

On April 20, 2015, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) endorsed the International Confederation of Midwives education and training standards and suggested that this criteria be adopted as the minimum requirements for midwifery licensure in the United States.  ACOG “advocates for implementation of the ICM standards in every state to assure all women access to safe, qualified, highly skilled providers.” In the same document, ACOG calls for a single midwife credential.  Currently, in the USA there are certified nurse midwives (CNM), Certified Midwives (CM) and Certified Professional Midwives (CPM) and they all have different core competencies and educational requirements.  You can read the entire ACOG statement here.  This document is meant to accompany their Levels of Maternal Care statement that I wrote about in a previous blog post.  Both of these recent statements signify a recognition that families have choices about the type of health care provider they receive their maternity care from and that more and more families every year are choosing midwifery.

Five interesting facts about midwifery

  1. There are approximately 26,000 midwives in the USA.  This number includes Certified Nurse Midwives, Certified Midwives and Certified Professional Midwives.
  2. Midwives practice and catch babies in hospitals, birth centers and in families’ homes.
  3. Midwives who are educated and regulated to international standards can provide 87% of the essential care needed for women and newborns. (UNFPA, 2014)
  4. 11.3% of all babies born in the USA in 2013 were caught by midwives (Martin, Hamilton, Osterman, et al. 2015)
  5. Approximately 0.6% of all midwives in the USA are male. (Pinkerton, Schorn, 2008)

Summary

How are you celebrating International Day of the Midwife in your community and in your classes?  Have you reached out to the midwives in your community and let them know that they are appreciated?  Take a moment to do so and join Lamaze International in thanking midwives for helping families have safe and healthy  births.

References

Fullerton, J. T., Thompson, J. B., & Severino, R. (2011). The International Confederation of Midwives essential competencies for basic midwifery practice. An update study: 2009–2010. Midwifery, 27(4), 399-408.

Martin JA, Hamilton BE, Osterman MJK, et al. Births: Final data for 2013. National vital statistics reports; vol 64 no 1. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics. 2015.

Pilkenton, D., & Schorn, M. N. (2008). Midwifery: a career for men in nursing.Men in Nursing Journal, 3(1), 32.

UNFPA. The State of the World’s Midwifery 2014. A Universal Pathway. A Woman’s Right to Health. United Nations Population Fund, New York; 2014

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BABE Series: Cesarean Section Role Play Helps Prepare Families

April 30th, 2015 by avatar

apron and babyToday, in our monthly series “Brilliant Activities for Birth Educators” (BABE), I would like to share one of the activities that I do in my Lamaze class to help families feel prepared for a cesarean section. Most families in my classes are planning a vaginal birth, but it never hurts to be prepared should plans change.  One in three pregnant people will birth by cesarean in the USA.  April is Cesarean Awareness Month and that is why I am sharing this activity at this time.

Objectives

My objectives for this specific activity are threefold – 1) to share how the procedure is done 2) to offer different options that might be available for the family to request (skin to skin in the OR, delayed newborn procedures, etc., and 3) brainstorm the role of the support person during a cesarean and what kind of support the pregnant person will find comforting and helpful.

This role play is done in the fifth week of a seven week series. We have just covered variations in labor (induction, augmentation, EFM, AROM, pain medications, assisted second stage and more). They have heard about the hard and soft reasons for a cesarean and now I hope that they will understand the procedure and the choices and options they might have at the time.

Supplies for the activity and the setup

  • Cesarean apron
  • surgical masks
  • drape
  • soft baby
  • hair nets
  • scrubs
  • surgical clothing
  • laminated labels for each role
  • optional – IV bag, BP cuff, EKG leads, etc
up close cesarean apron

Up close of four zippers on cesarean apron

My main prop in this activity is a “cesarean apron” handmade by Kris Avery, a fellow LCCE here in Washington State. The apron has breasts, a belly button and some pubic hair painted on it, but what makes it special is a series of zippers that correspond to the different layers of a person’s body that will be cut during the cesarean procedure. Each zipper is sewn into a different layer and opens to reveal the layer underneath. The skin is represented by the apron, and then there is a layer of fat (yellow felt) that zips open, revealing the uterus (red felt). There are no muscles to “open” because as we know, the abdominal muscles are retracted and not cut. Finally, underneath the uterus, is the amniotic sac, represented by a thin white nylon material.

I ask a partner to come with me out of sight of the class and place the cesarean apron on them. All the zippers are closed. I place a soft baby doll (I use the baby from IKEA) underneath the apron with the head positioned right near the inner zipper.  Sometimes I place the baby in the breech position and plan on having the bum be removed first. When the partner is ready, we walk together back into the classroom and I ask them to lay on a table, where I have placed a pillow.

How I conduct the role play

I invite two class members to come up and hold a drape at chest level, just like it might be positioned in the OR.  I hand out laminated cards to all the other class members. Each card has the role of someone who might be in the OR during a cesarean section – surgeon, baby nurse, anesthesiologist, surgical tech, respiratory therapist, and so on.   I ask the pregnant person who is partnered with my “cesarean person” to play the role of “partner.”  I invite the partner to get into the white “moon suit” that is normally provided to family members during a cesarean.  I hand out hair nets, scrubs, face masks, surgical gowns, to all those who will be in the OR and everyone suits up.  I position all the “actors” in the appropriate spot.  Some go by a pretend “baby warmer” and others stand around the birthing person while others go where they might be in the real operating room. I talk about how hard it is to tell who is in the room and what their role is, when everyone is wearing scrubs/gowns/hats/masks and suggest that they ask people to introduce themselves.  I discuss strategies that the birthing person can use if they are temporarily separated from their support person.  I bring the support person over and seat them at the head of the OR table near the “anesthesiologist” and discuss how they cannot see over the drape for both the patient and the partner. The partner can stand up at the time of birth if they wish, or together they could ask for the drape to be dropped at that moment.  I ask the pregnant person how they are feeling as the surgery is about to begin.FullSizeRender

I walk everyone through the procedure step by step and describe what is happening.  I share what noises they might hear, and what sensations the pregnant person might “feel.”  (Tugging, pressure, pulling, but no pain.)  I try and give a sense of how long it takes for each part of the operation, (prep, incision to baby, closure)  I ask the surgeons to begin to open the zippers, and talk about each layer that they come to.  Finally the surgeons are through the amniotic sac and they reach in and remove the baby’s head through the opening. It is a somewhat tight fit and we discuss how that might benefit the baby.

The baby is delivered, shown to the parents and taken over to the “warmer” where the baby team is waiting.  I encourage partner to go over and see the baby, initiate talking to the baby and start sharing information with the birthing person – what the baby looks like, how s/he is doing, and so on.

cesarean apronWe go on to discuss how the partner can facilitate having the baby brought over to the birthing person ASAP, skin-to-skin, what might need to happen if baby is moved to the special care nursery, and more.  Throughout all of this, the class participants are role-playing through all of the likely activities and people are stepping up to help the family to have a positive experience, within the scope of their assigned role.  The surgeons close (zip up) the different layers and close the outer zipper on the skin.

I am leaving out much of the detail, as I am confident that you can fill in the activities that happen when a person is prepped, taken to the OR, has the cesarean surgery and is then taken to recover.  My hope is to have parents aware of some of the major points of the overall procedure.

Processing the activity

The class members take off the “costumes” and return to their seats.  I feel it is very important to debrief this activity.  It can be overwhelming to some. We debrief further, discussing any observations they had, how they felt as our role play was happening. I ask what are the values that are important to them and their family, if a cesarean should be needed.  A discussion also takes place about what a cesarean recovery plan might look like and how the family’s needs might change if they do not have a vaginal birth.

How is this activity received?

IMG_0116During the activity, class members are usually very engaged and creative in answering questions, acting out their “roles” and brainstorming solutions to the situations I present.  The real magic happens when we debrief.  I can see the wheels turning as families articulate what they will want and need should they have a cesarean birth.  They learn that they have a voice and can share what is important with their medical team.

Time and time again, I receive emails and and notes from class members who ended up having a cesarean. They share how “accurate” our role play was and how it helped them to understand the steps involved with their cesarean.  They were able to speak up in regards to their preferences and felt like their class preparation helped to reduce their stress and anxiety.

Summary

This activity takes time and I often wonder if I should replace it with something much shorter that covers the same topic.  But, I continue to do this role play activity because I see how it really helps families to understand how to play an active role in the birth of their baby, even if it is by cesarean section.

Other resources that I share with the class are the following links:

How might you make a “cesarean apron” that you could use for this activity?  Do you have ideas on how you could modify this activity for your classes?  What other things do you do to help your families to be prepared for a cesarean birth?  I would love to learn how you cover this important topic.  Please share your ideas in the comments section below.

 

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