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BABE Series: Ms. Potato Head Does the Stages of Labor – and So Can YOU!

March 26th, 2015 by avatar

 By Stacie Bingham, CD(DONA)

mom & spudFor the March BABE (Brilliant Activities for Birth Educators) series post, childbirth educator Stacie Bingham breaks out a well-known children’s toy and uses it to help class participants to fully understand what they might experience emotionally during labor and birth.  Creative, interactive and very memorable, this activity helps parents connect what they just learned about the stages and phases of labor and prepares them for the normal roller coaster of emotions and activities that may arise during their own labor and birth. I cannot wait to try this myself, I just have to find myself a whole lot of Potato Head toys! – Sharon Muza, Community Manager, Science & Sensibility

 

“A fun, interactive way to incorporate a tactile experience into class instruction. All the moms and support people were laughing and interacting and really applying what we had just learned about.” – class participant

early laborWhen people laugh and confess that they “actually had fun in a childbirth class,” you know something’s gone right. As an educator, this is my goal. If learners let their guards down and enjoy themselves, presented ideas don’t just fly in one ear and out the other — they flow in and settle, like books on a bookshelf, where information can be accessed later.

Looking for an activity to reinforce the stages of labor, and the emotions and physical sensations that go along with each stage,  I came up with an idea involving Potato Heads. Luckily, our family has been amassing a Potato Head collection since 2001. I wanted one Potato for each stage and phase of labor. The bonus was, I found a “Baby Potato,” complete with extended tongue and ready to nurse (where? I am not sure, as breasts aren’t something Potato Heads come with as standard equipment). I carefully selected each Potato’s accessories, to physically or symbolically represent what she might be experiencing. I then disrobed the Potatoes and placed their accessories in their storage area (AKA butt).active labor

In my classes, covering the “Stages of Labor” topic takes about an hour. In a typical two-hour class, this activity fits well for the last 20 minutes or so on the same night. At this point, the class has had a snack break and additional discussion about pertinent topics. As a closing, and a way to recall what was just shared in the first hour, I pass around the Potatoes. Each person or couple takes one, (depending on class size.) They put together their Potatoes, and then we discuss which stage or phase they have, and what they think about the specific wardrobe selection – what it might mean for labor.

Early Labor 

Ms. “Early Labor Potato” is wearing earrings; she has her purse and her nice shoes on. Her eyes are excited, her nose is pink (calm), and her grin tells it all – she is excited labor is finally beginning! She has decided to go shopping to pass the time and pick up some last-minute items. I added the purse as well to think about what baggage she might be carrying around as labor becomes imminent.

Active Labor

transitionMs. “Active Labor Potato” is starting to get her first intense contractions, and with that, the first worries about her ability to cope. Her eyes are wider, showing her uncertainty. She is gritting her teeth, her nose is red, and her sneakers are on – she is working harder, warming up, and moving around.

Transition 

Ms. “Transition Potato” – she’s hot! Her visor, her tongue, and her orange nose show it. I have no idea why we have a hand with that green stuff on it, but I decided it was appropriate! (“Is that vomit in my Potato’s hand?” a mom questioned.) Her wide eyes give an idea of her emotional state, and her bunny slippers further address her need to be comfortable (which is also symbolic of the need to feel safe).

Pushing

second stageMs. “Second Stage” I likened to how pushing can sometimes feel foreign, or alien. She has no shoes, because at this point they would be off her feet (I used a jar lid under her base to keep her upright). I also made her a “pushy” face (while wishing I had a 3D printer!). Her red nose has returned, as this is physical work, and her confidence is increasing as she knows her baby is closer than ever.

“The potatoes were perfect to play with and keep everyone in class alive and moving. It held our interest and was still a teaching exercise.” – class participant

Third Stage

Ms. “Third Stage” has blissed-out eyes (which I drew and taped on) – she finally birthed her little spud! Her mouth shows joy, and her nose has returned to its calm pink color. Still no shoes – who needs ‘em? A few minutes and a little push for the placenta, and now it’s on to enjoying her newborn!third stage

The feedback from this activity is always amazing. It may seem silly and juvenile – I mean birth is serious business, right? But parents appreciate outside-the-box learning opportunities. As adults, there aren’t many times in training or instruction when we veer from left-brain directed thinking – and there’s too much PowerPoint out there in many classes. Manipulating the pieces while talking and laughing, anchors and connects information through touch as well as sight. Playing with these Potatoes allows creativity to spark. As educators, make the effort to offer alternative, unconventional ways to share information – and I promise, your class won’t forget it.

About Stacie Bingham

© Stacie Bingham

© Stacie Bingham

Stacie Bingham, CD(DONA), is a Lamaze-trained educator who embraces the lighter side of the often weighty subject of birth. Her style feels more like a comedy-show experience than a traditional class. She has been a La Leche League Leader for 13 year, attended 150 births as a doula, and logged 1000 hours as a childbirth educator. An experienced writer and editor, she was a columnist for the Journal of Perinatal Education’s media reviews, has been published in LLLI’s New Beginnings and DONA International’s International Doula, and keeps up with her blog (where she frequently shares her teaching ideas).

She is the current Chair for Visalia Birth Network, and a founding member of Chico Doula Circle, and Advocates for Tongue Tie Education. Stacie has presented at conferences on the topic of tongue tie, as her 4th baby came with strings attached. Stacie and her four sons, husband, and (male) dog reside in California’s Central Valley. For more information or teaching tips, visit her at staciebingham.com.

Childbirth Education, Guest Posts, Series: BABE - Brilliant Activities for Birth Educators , , , , ,

New Webinar for Birth Pros: “Making It Work! – Breastfeeding Tips for the Working Mom”

March 24th, 2015 by avatar
breastfeeding working mother

flickr.com/photos/jennysbradford/4356862824

I often share in childbirth classes that breastfeeding can be the next big challenge after birth.  As a childbirth educator, I weave breastfeeding information throughout my class series. By the time the “breastfeeding” part of the class happens towards the end of the series, the families are eager and ready to learn how to be as prepared as possible to feed their baby, without actually having baby there yet to “practice” with.

I provide additional follow up resources for the families as well, including where to get help locally with breastfeeding issues, what current best practice says on a variety of breastfeeding topics and useful videos like effective hand expression.  Returning to work and breastfeeding is one topic that I feel is important to cover, but often gets short shrift due to lack of time. Families don’t even have their babies in their arms yet, and the “return to work” point still seems very far off, and I have a lot of information to share in a short class time. In some areas, there are specific classes that families can attend that specialize in the “breastfeeding for the working parent” topic, but not many families can locate or take advantage of this type of class.

I would love to be able to support my families long after their childbirth education class is over with information they can use and apply for the working/breastfeeding parent, and that is why I am planning on attending Lamaze International’s free (non-Lamaze members $20) 60 minute webinar “Making It Work! Breastfeeding Tips for the Working Mom” offered on March 26th at 1:00 PM EST.

It is well documented that exclusive breastfeeding rates drop significantly when women return to work or school.  There are many barriers to overcome and prenatal information and support can help families to prepare for the time when babies are being cared for by others and still being breastfed.  This online webinar is appropriate for doulas, childbirth educators, lactation consultants, nursing staff, physicians and midwives.

The webinar is being presented by Patty Nilsen, RN, BSN, BA, IBCLC, ANLC.  Patty is an Outpatient Lactation Consultant for Mount Carmel East, West & St. Ann’s Hospitals in Columbus, Ohio, where she provides daily private outpatient lactation consultation for women experiencing challenges and in need of encouragement with breastfeeding, leads weekly breastfeeding support groups, and answers over 300 breastfeeding helpline calls per month.  Patty has learned many innovative tips for returning to work and breastfeeding from the thousands of mothers she has worked with over the years and is eager to share them in this webinar.

© womenshealth.gov

© womenshealth.gov

The webinar is open to all, and Lamaze International members are able to attend at no cost.  Non-members will pay $20 at registration to participate.  Additionally, this workshop has been approved for continuing nursing education hours which  are accepted by DONA, Lamaze, ICEA and other birth professional organizations. The cost for receiving continuing education hours for Lamaze members is $35 and for non-members is $55, (which includes the cost of the webinar). As mentioned above, Lamaze members attend for free, if they are not enrolled for the contact hours.  Contact hours are awarded after completing the webinar and a post-webinar evaluation. CERPS are pending.

You can register for the webinar (select contact hours or no-contact hours) at this link – and then prepare to join on Thursday at 1:oo PM EST.  After the webinar, come back and share your top takeaways and how you are going to use this information to support families in your area with other Science & Sensibility readers.

Babies, Breastfeeding, Childbirth Education, Lamaze International, Webinars , , , , , , ,

Birth By The Numbers Releases New Video – Myth and Reality Concerning US Cesareans

March 19th, 2015 by avatar

birth by numbers header

I have been a huge fan of Dr. Eugene Declercq and his team over at Birth by the Numbers ever since I watched the original Birth by the Numbers bonus segment that was found on the Orgasmic Birth DVD I purchased back in 2008.  I was on the board of REACHE when we brought Dr. Declercq to Seattle to speak at our regional childbirth conference in 2010 and since then have heard him present at various conferences around the country, including most recently at the 2014 Lamaze International/DONA International Confluence, where Dr. Declercq was a keynote speaker.  I enjoy listening to him just as much now as I did back in 2008.  You  may also be familiar with Dr. Declercq’s work as part of the Listening to Mothers research team that has brought us three very valuable studies.

Birth by the Numbers has grown into a valuable and up to date website for the birth professional and the consumer, filled to the brim with useful information, videos, slide presentations and blog posts.  This past Tuesday, the newest video was released on the website: Birth By The Numbers: Part II – Myth and Reality Concerning US Cesareans and is embedded here for you to watch.  We shared Part I in a blog post last fall.


Also available for public use is a slide presentation located in the the “Teaching Tools” section of the Birth by the Numbers website designed to provide additional information, maps, data and resources for this new Myths and Reality Concerning Cesareans video. Included in this slideshow are notes and updates to help you understand the slides and share with others.  This material is freely given for your use.

© Birth by the Numbers

© Birth by the Numbers

This video explores how cesareans impact maternity care systems in the USA.  After watching the video and reviewing the slides, here are some of my top takeaways.

1.  The common reasons given for the nearly 33% cesarean rate in the USA (bigger babies, older mothers, more mothers with obesity, diabetes and hypertension, more multiples and maternal request) just don’t hold water when examined closer.

2. Many women feel pressure from their healthcare provider to have a cesarean, either prenatally or in labor.

3. The leading indicators for cesareans are labor arrest (34%) and nonreassuring fetal heart tracings (23%).

4. The rise in cesareans is not a result of a different indications.  Dr. Declercq quotes a 20 year old article’s title that could still grace the front pages today. “The Rise in Cesarean Section Rate: the same indications – but a lower threshold.”

5. When examining the distribution of cesarean births by states over time, it is clear that those states with the highest cesarean birth rate decades ago, still remain in those spots today.

6. “We are talking about cultural phenomena when we are talking about cesareans, not just medical phenomena.”

7. First time, low risk mothers who birthed at term and experienced labor had a 5% cesarean rate if they went into spontaneous labor and did not receive an epidural.  If they were induced and received an epidural, the cesarean rate was 31%.

8. The United States has the lowest VBAC rate of any industrialized country in the world.

© Birth by the Numbers

© Birth by the Numbers

While the video is rich (and heavy) in data laden charts and diagrams, the message, though not new, is clear.  The US maternity care system is in crisis.  We have to right the ship, and get back on course for healthier and safer births for pregnant people and babies. Take a look at this new video, and think about what messages you can share with the families you work with and in the classes you teach, to help consumers make informed choices about the care they receive during the childbearing year.

Please watch the video, visit the website to view the slides and let me know here in the comments section what you are going to use from this information to improve birth.

Babies, Cesarean Birth, Childbirth Education, informed Consent, Maternal Obesity, Maternal Quality Improvement, Maternity Care, Medical Interventions, New Research , , , ,

Thanks IBCLCs – For Helping New Families Meet Their Breastfeeding Goals

March 5th, 2015 by avatar

IBCLCDayLogo 2015(2)Yesterday was IBCLC Day – a special day set aside once a year to recognize the hard work and efforts that International Board Certified Lactation Consultants provide all all year long in support of breastfeeding for mothers, babies and really, the entire family.  IBCLC Day is sponsored by the International Lactation Consultant Association, a professional organization for IBCLCs around the world.

Becoming an IBCLC is no easy feat; the requirements to become credentialed are very rigorous and involve many clinical hours and an exhaustive exam.  Continuing education hours and/or retaking the exam are required every 5 years to maintain the credentials.  There are over 27,450 IBCLCs worldwide.

Some IBCLCs are also Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educators.  Both organizations represent the gold standard in their field and it is not surprising that some professionals seek out both qualifications.  When an LCCE is also an IBCLC, their class families can really benefit.  The LCCE is able to weave in a rich knowledge of breastfeeding topics and information throughout the class, as well as share information about common challenges that they see when working as an IBCLC.

creative commons licensed (BY-NC) flickr photo by robysaltori: http://flickr.com/photos/robysaltori/4604876371

CC flickr photo by robysaltori: http://flickr.com/photos/robysaltori/4604876371

A lactation consultant can use their childbirth education skills to hone their communication and help families understand the nuances of feeding their babies when they are delivering breastfeeding information during a consultation.  The two professions can complement each other beautifully.

Of course, the scope of practice of LCCEs and IBCLCs is different, and it is important to recognize the separation and to wear the proper hat when conducting yourself professionally in either capacity.

For official information on how to become an IBCLC, check out the information on the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners (IBLCE ) site. If you are considering becoming an IBCLC, there is an Facebook Group just for you, where you can discuss the different pathways, find out more about the requirements and costs, and receive the support of other men and women exploring the IBCLC process and preparing for the exam.

I reached out to some Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educators, who are also IBCLCs, to ask some questions and learn more about experience of wearing both hats.  Teri Shilling, Ann Grauer and Ashley Benz generously shared their thoughts below.

Sharon Muza:  Which credential did you receive first, your IBCLC or your LCCE?

Teri Shilling: I received my LCCE first.

Ann Grauer: I was an LCCE first. I never thought I’d be an IBCLC but one year the policies fit me and I decided to go for it.

Ashley Benz: I became an LCCE first and then an IBCLC. My goal had always been to become a lactation consultant. I knew that it was a long road and I was so interested in getting started working with families that I did a couple of certifications before I was ready to take my IBCLC exam.

SM: How does having both credentials benefit your students and clients?

Teri: So much of my work as an IBCLC is education – by the bedside, on the phone, etc.  Keeping things simple and memorable is key.  The certifications speaks to my professionalism and commitment to continuing education

Ann: I had a CLC before my IBCLC—I’ve always felt that I wanted and needed more information on breastfeeding. I’ve taught breastfeeding classes since the beginning but the information explosion in that one topic is incredible!  I feel very strongly that it serves my childbirth classes well that I have that credential and that being an LCCE serves my breastfeeding clients. I see things from a “facilitator of education” standpoint, rather than a traditional IBCLC standpoint.

Ashley: Because a lot of what a lactation consultant does is teach, I use the skills I’ve gained from teaching Lamaze class in breastfeeding consultations. In Lamaze class, I use my knowledge about breastfeeding and mother-infant bonding.

SM: Does your IBCLC knowledge influence how and what you teach about breastfeeding? 

Teri: Yes, I think it does, but I have been an IBCLC for 20+ years and can’t remember what I taught before.  But being an IBCLC gives me first had experience with the big bumps in the road many women hit during the postpartum time.

Ann: Yes. I’ve actually simplified what I teach. Being an IBCLC, means I now appreciate that parents need simple and honest information that they can incorporate into their parenting.

Ashley: I probably emphasize the need to seek proper help more than other educators. My class focuses on the basics of breastfeeding and assumes I’ve convinced my students to get support for issues that arise.

SM: What would you recommend for other LCCEs who might want to be an IBCLC? What are the challenges?

Teri: Do a community search for where the gaps are in support – is there a breastfeeding coalition in your area? It is important to network.  Find a mentor.  I would say go for it.  More education never hurts.  The challenge is being employed as an IBCLC as a non-nurse.  It helps if you are the entrepreneur type and able to set up a private practice.

Ann: If you’re a non-RN you will have to work incredibly hard. The system is set up to be medically-minded and there is not appreciation/understanding of what non-RNs bring to the table. Which, by the way, is a lot. Rather than focusing on becoming an IBCLC, allow yourself to enjoy the journey of learning and you’ll be there before you know it.

Ashley: The major challenge of the IBCLC path is that it can be very time (and often financially) intensive. I recommend checking out the IBLCE website and see if there is a pathway that you already fit into. If not, make a five-year plan to become an IBCLC.

SM: Where do you think it gets tricky wearing both hats?

Teri: I don’t think it does.  I love being able to be part of the continuum from pregnancy to postpartum.

Ann: I don’t think it does. My confidence is in the mother and baby. I’m just here to help in any role I can.

Ashley: Whenever you have multiple sets of skills, it can be difficult to maintain appropriate business boundaries and communicate those to your students and clients.

Careers as both a Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator and an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant are fun, challenging and very rewarding.  They are a wonderful compliment to each other and families can benefit from the knowledge that someone who holds both credentials can share when serving in either role.  Are you an LCCE who has considered or would like to become an IBCLC?  Are you already on that path?  Share a bit about your journey in our comments section and let us know.

Babies, Breastfeeding, Childbirth Education, Newborns , , , , , , , , ,

Jazz It Up! Using Haiku Deck to Create Snappy Image-Based Presentations

March 3rd, 2015 by avatar

By Jocelyn Alt, CD(ToLabor), MBA

 My favorite way to teach is using interactive, engaging activities that get my families building community with each other, interacting with class members, actively partipating rather than passive listening and often up and out of their seats.  Sometimes, it does become necessary to use a presentation format to present a topic.  Alternately, using such a format can help reinforce one of the activities you are doing in class.  Today on Science & Sensibility, CBE and doula Jocelyn Alt shares a tool, Haiku Deck, that she uses to create interesting presentations to use in her childbirth classes.  Jocelyn reviews it here and shares some of her recent presentations. – Sharon Muza, Science & Sensibility Community Manager.

Some of my most rewarding moments as a childbirth educator are times when former participants share stories about using skills or information during their births that they learned in class. It might be a squatting position we practiced, the benefits and risks of narcotics as pain relief that we teach using an interactive game, or the BRAIN acronym for making informed decisions (see below if you are unfamiliar with this rubric.) My team of educators and I are always looking for new ways to make our classes more engaging and memorable so that our students will have a higher likelihood of recalling the information when they need it most – during labor.

Haiku Deck – reinforcing learning

It’s been known for eons that using images reinforces learning (it’s been said so often, the adage is hackneyed: “A picture is worth a thousand words.” But it’s often true!) So I was excited when I recently found out about a tool that allows you to create beautiful image-based slide presentations in a snap. It’s called Haiku Deck. Presentations created with this program can be used in conjunction with interactive activities as an introduction or backdrop, or alongside lecture components of class.

© Jocelyn Alt

© Jocelyn Alt

Here is an example of a presentation created with Haiku Deck: Top Five Tips for New Moms. If you click on the deck and view it on the Haiku Deck site, you can also see the notes that accompany each slide. After looking at the presentation, try testing its effectiveness on yourself. How many images do you remember from it? How many of the messages do you remember? How many do you think you would have remembered if you had simply seen them presented as text in a bulleted list?

Here’s another Haiku Deck for the acronym BRAIN: Five Essential Questions for Decision-Making in Labor, which I use to teach informed decision making. Each letter of the Screenshot 2015-03-02 16.22.22acronym stands for a question laboring parents can ask themselves and their care providers when faced with a decision in labor – or at any other time for that matter. One dad said that he found it so useful, he started using it as a decision-making tool at work! The acronym stands for Benefits, Risks, Alternatives, Intuition, and Need Time. Acronyms themselves can help with recall, and reinforcing them with images can make them even more sticky.

What I like about Haiku Deck

Ease of Use – The interface is elegant and simple to use.  One great feature is the huge library of images.  You just type in a word that relates to your content, and dozens of photos come up for your use.  With one click, you can add them to your presentation.

Effectiveness – The structure of Haiku Deck forces you to be concise with your words and use images to communicate much of your message. The result is presentations that connect to people.  Many of the most popular slide decks on the large presentation posting site SlideShare were made with Haiku Deck because they draw people in and are memorable.

Accessibility – You can use Haiku Deck to make presentations in a browser on your computer or through the iPad app. Presentations are all backed up on the Haiku Deck site and can be embedded into websites and social media, so you can easily make them available to your participants to reference outside of class.

Just for fun, here’s one last Haiku Deck on the Six Signs of Labor Progression.

Screenshot 2015-03-02 16.32.49

If you try Haiku Deck in your classes, I’d love to see any presentations you develop. Drop the links in the comments section below and let us know if you found the program easy or difficult to use and a bit about your experience.

Resources

Defetyer, M. A., Russo, R., McPartlin, P. L. (2009). The picture superiority effect in recognition memory: a developmental study using the response signal procedure.Cognitive Development, 24, 265-273. doi: 10.1016/j.cogdev.2009.05.002

Foos, P.W., & Goolkasian, P. (2005). Presentation formats in working memory: The role of attention. Memory & Cognition, 33(3), 499-513.

Shepard, R.N. (1967). Recognition memory for words, sentences, and pictures. Journal of Learning and Verbal Behavior, 6, 156-163.

About Jocelyn Alt

© Jocelyn Alt

© Jocelyn Alt

Jocelyn Alt, CD, MBA, is a childbirth educator and birth doula who has been working with expecting and new parents since 2006. Jocelyn is the Founder and Director of Ohana, a birth and parenting services company with locations in Chicago and Seattle that offers childbirth classes, prenatal yoga, doulas, new parent groups, and maternity concierge services. The word ohana means “family” in Hawaiian and refers to one’s inner circle of both family and close friends. In addition to helping parents-to-be transition to parenthood, Jocelyn enjoys hiking, cycling, and hosting dinner parties. She lives in Seattle, WA.  Reach Jocelyn through her website  www.OhanaParents.com.

 

 

 

Childbirth Education, Guest Posts , ,