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Congratulations to Cara Terreri and Lamaze Parent Blog – Giving Birth With Confidence

June 23rd, 2015 by avatar

Congratulations Giving Birth withWhile Science & Sensibility is geared primarily for birth professionals and health care providers, Lamaze International also has a long running blog that is written by Cara Terreri, specifically with the expectant family in mind.  Giving Birth with Confidence (GBWC) offers families a wonderful mix of posts that highlight current best practice and evidence based information, fun and lighthearted topics for the pregnant and parenting crowd, and regular pregnancy week by week features that showcase development and concerns as a people move through their pregnancies.  One of my favorite topics on the GBWC blog is the “Great Expectations” series which follows a pregnant person through their pregnancy and birth, with regular posts documenting the progress, emotions and circumstances that are arising for the featured family.

I am not the only one that thinks that the Giving Birth with Confidence Blog is the bomb!  Healthline recently named Giving Birth with Confidence one of the top pregnancy blogs for 2015.  Cara Terreri has been writing the GBWC blog since its inception, and the honor is well deserved.  You may recall Cara from some posts she has done on this blog, as we followed her on her path to becoming a Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator.  She has also been a guest blogger here on other topics.

I asked Cara some questions about her experience as writer and community manager for the Giving Birth with Confidence Blog and share her answers with you here now.

Sharon Muza: What do you hope that parents take away from reading the Giving Birth with Confidence blog?

Cara Terreri: I hope that parents  take away from GBWC that birth is a normal part of life, not an illness or fearful event, and in fact, that it can be an exhilarating, amazing, and beautiful experience. I also hope they take away practical information to help prepare for and shape their experience.

SM: What are some of the challenges that you see when writing a blog geared for parents in the childbearing year?

CT: I can identify two challenges — giving topics the detail they deserve without overwhelming parents with information. That’s a challenge childbirth educators often face in classes, too. The other is presenting information in a non-biased, non-judgmental way. It can be easy for my opinion to creep in when I should be presenting “just the facts, ma’am.”

SM: There has never been more online information available to parents – what distinguishes GBWC from other online resources?

CT: Evidence based information, first and foremost. Followed by a tendency to address important issues and choices women face, not just what’s “hot” or “trendy.”

SM: What have been some of your favorite posts of all time?  What about the favorite posts of the readers?

CT: My favorite posts come from the expectant moms who participate in our Great Expectations series, an every-other-week chronicle of their pregnancy. Often, the posts just contain thoughts and reflections of pregnancy, motherhood, and birth, which is just perfect. Our readers, interesting enough, tend to click through most to our post about Lamaze breathing, which provides clarity on how Lamaze teaches breathing as a coping mechanism in labor. Families might come to us to learn about breathing, but they leave with so much more!

SM: Why should childbirth educators and other birth professionals share this blog with the families that they work with and encourage them to become regular readers?

CT: Birth professionals and CBEs can trust the content, when they recommend it to the families they work with. It supports and mirrors what is taught in a Lamaze class. Our content is also easy to read and understand.

I hope that you will share this blog with the families you teach or work with, so that they can receive the information and community that GBWC offers to readers.  If you have suggestions for future post topics, would like to be a guest blogger or have some helpful feedback, please contact Cara directly.

cara headshotI would like to invite all of you to join me in congratulating my friend and colleague Cara Terreri and the Giving Birth with Confidence blog on a job well done!  I know that many families are better prepared and better informed as a result of the exceptional information that is shared on the blog.  Make sure that the families that you work with are aware of this valuable resource.  This recognition is well-deserved and I am delighted that you have received it.  I look forward to more posts on the topics that are important to families everywhere.

Awards, Babies, Giving Birth with Confidence, Lamaze International, Lamaze News , , ,

BABE Series: Postpartum Survival Kit – Helping Families Be Ready for Life with a Newborn

May 26th, 2015 by avatar

By Cara Terreri, LCCE

PSK BABEMay’s Brilliant Activities for Birth Educators (BABE) idea is all about the postpartum period.  Lots of families don’t realize that good childbirth classes not only prepare families for the labor and birth but can be a wealth of information about the first weeks with a new baby.  Today on Science & Sensibility, Cara Terreri, LCCE shares her classroom activity to help families get ready for what happens after the birth – when they bring that new little one home. – Sharon Muza, Science & Sensibility Community Manager 

Introduction

The postpartum period is an important component of childbirth education. As we know, preparation for the birth of a child isn’t enough. And unfortunately in our culture, postpartum needs aren’t given a lot of attention, which means that parents often feel unprepared, confused, and frustrated during the early days and weeks after baby comes home.

For my childbirth classes, I developed a fun and interactive activity to introduce and discuss the many topics related to postpartum. The exercise can be a stand-alone activity (in a refresher childbirth class) or used as an opener to more in-depth activities and lessons on postpartum in an entire series. My inspiration for creating the “Postpartum Survival Kit” was the wonderfully humorous “Postpartum Robe,” a trademark teaching tool from Teri Shilling, MS, CD(DONA), IBCLC, LCCE, Passion for Birth founder and Lamaze educator, as well as Lamaze Childbirth Educator Seminar trainer.

The Postpartum Survival Kit (PSK) consists of a large plastic container with lid (mine also includes a handle, which helps for easy transport), and includes 23 items representing different issues or experiences a family may encounter during the postpartum period. The items represent everything from the physical recovery after birth (peri bottle, thick menstrual pad, and hemorrhoid cream) to emotional issues, like the importance of finding “me time” and postpartum mood disorders.

How It’s Used

In my classes, after introducing the topic of the postpartum period, I bring out the PSK, pass it around, and instruct families to take out 2-3 items (depending on the number of students in class). I then introduce the PSK and talk about how the different items represent typical encounters and issues during the postpartum. We then go around the room and each couple is asked to share the items they pulled and offer an explanation of their significance. Some items are more obvious, like the sleep mask for the importance of getting sleep when you can; some elicit giggles and awkward moments, like the KY jelly which represents the possible need for vaginal lubrication during intercourse if the parent is breastfeeding; and some items are confusing, like the mini manicure kit (taking “me time”) and the red golf ball (size of postpartum clots, what’s normal and what’s not).

photo 2When students share their items, I jump in when they (or the other students) cannot accurately describe the item’s meaning. I also open the floor for discussion with open-ended questions like “How would you cope?” and “What kind of support would you need if this should happen to you?” and “Who could you call on for help?” Depending on the size of your class, this exercise can take up a good amount of time, so be sure to plan appropriately and be prepared to reel in side discussions should it get off course.

Takeaways

Parents in my classes really enjoy this exercise. I get a lot of laughs, bewildered looks, and “lightbulb” moments. It’s always interesting to see how often the non-birth parent accurately describe the significance of items in this exercise – there have been many moments where the pregnant person is stumped, but the partner knows. In these instances, the exercise provides reassurance to both parents that the knowledge on what to expect during postpartum is intuitive. Additionally, I have found that this tangible exercise helps reinforce learning and memory when we talk more in depth about postpartum issues later in the class.

Modifications

The PSK exercise can be modified in several ways. I’ve used it in coordination with a worksheet, which could also be turned into a competition between families. If using in a private class, you can have each family member take turns with each new item. You could also use the exercise as an interactive teach-back. Ask each family to take out 2-3 items, learn about their significance (offer assistance if they are completely stumped), and then return to the next class and teach the other students.

The PSK also could be replicated for use in teaching the stages of labor and breastfeeding. Create a similar, smaller kit for each stage of labor and/or breastfeeding and begin the segment with the kit. For example, a Transition Kit may include a focal point, washcloth, water bottle, and mini bullhorn (to signify the “take charge” routine). 

Contents & Creating Your Own

The fun part about creating a PSK is making it uniquely your own! Some of the items will naturally be the same (lochia pad, hospital underwear, peri bottle, breastfeeding pads, for example), but others are limited only by your creativity! Consider the ways in which you can demonstrate postpartum mood disorders, changing emotions, dividing up hours in the day, eating nutritious food, sleep, etc. Items included in my Postpartum Survival Kit are:

  • Water bottle – keeping hydrated
  • Hospital underwear and pad – postpartum bleeding
  • Peri bottle, Dermaplast, and ice pack – perineal healing
  • Elastic abdominal brace – cesarean healing and core strengthening
  • Plate with balanced meal – postpartum nutrition
  • Ibuprofen – normal aches and pains
  • Hemorrhoid cream – a not uncommon postpartum issue
  • Stool softener – this is an important concern for many!
  • KY Jelly – lubrication issues
  • Condoms – postpartum fertility/birth control
  • Eye mask – getting sleep
  • Small red balloon paired with giant red balloon – involution, postpartum tummy
  • Hand mirror with puzzled/confused face – postpartum mood disorders (“I don’t recognize myself”)
  • Laminated speech bubble with “helpful” advice – dealing with influx of family/friend advice
  • Cloth breastfeeding pads – leaking nipples
  • Stuffed heart toy with wide open arms – finding and accepting support
  • Do not disturb door hanger – limiting visitors is ok; family time is important
  • Small baby doll with a heart and question mark on her tummy – conflicting emotions a baby often brings
  • Encouragement flags – encourage and praise your partner
  • Manicure kit – making time for yourself
  • Pill box modified to read “house, partner, work, baby care, errands, etc.” and filled with 24 beads, divvied up into the different compartments – how will you divide your time

 What else might you add to your customized Postpartum Survival Kit? There are many ways to teach about adapting to and surviving the postpartum weeks.  How do you teach about the postpartum period in your childbirth classes?  What activities have you found effective?  Share with all of us in the comments section.  If you have a “BABE”  to share in future posts – please contact me and let’s talk. – SM

Note/Disclaimer: The use of the acronym “BABE” (Brilliant Activities for Birth Educators) is not affiliated with, aligned with or associated with any particular childbirth program or organization.

About Cara Terreri, LCCE

© Cara Terreri

© Cara Terreri

Cara is a Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, doula, and site administrator for the Lamaze parent blog, Giving Birth with Confidence. She teaches and works in Myrtle Beach, SC, where she lives with her husband and three children. You can learn more about Cara at Simple Support Birth.

 

Childbirth Education, Giving Birth with Confidence, Guest Posts, Series: Brilliant Activities for Birth Educators , , ,

Because… A Poem Honoring Cesarean Awareness Month

April 9th, 2015 by avatar

CAM 2015 GBWCGiving Birth with Confidence is the sister blog to Science & Sensibility, Lamaze International and is geared for parents and new families.  Cara Terreri, ( you may remember Cara, we followed her journey to becoming an LCCE) has been the Community Manager there since the blog was first established in 2008.  I always point the families in my classes to Giving Birth with Confidence because I know that they will find evidence based information along with great inspiration to push for a safe and healthy birth.

Cara recently wrote and published a poem on Giving Birth With Confidence to commemorate Cesarean Awareness Month (April), and it really spoke to me.  Since April is also National Poetry Month, I wanted to share her poem with you, in hopes that you might pass on and share with the families you work with.  Because 1 in 3 is too many.

Because…

1 in 3 is too many

Recovery is hard

My birth was still a birth

I want to have a VBAC

My scar still hurts

I was separated from my baby

My doula supported me in the OR

I didn’t have a choice

I got to experience skin to skin with my baby right away

I made the choice this time

I wish I would have known

I feel cheated

My doctor never told me this could happen

It’s going to be OK

My sister said this was easier anyway

My midwife made the right decision to transfer to the hospital

Friends told me at least I had a healthy baby

I have postpartum depression

It was the best decision for my birth

My husband has scars too

I’m embarrassed

My doula wasn’t allowed back into the OR

I failed the one thing I’m supposed to be able to do as a woman

My mom had one too; I guess it was meant to happen

I know my doctor helped me make the best decision

I want more for my daughter

I am a source of courage and support for others who have gone before me and those who will go after me

I did the best that I could with the knowledge I had at the time

I’m doing better now

My baby is beautiful

My body is strong

I am resilient

My birth matters

By Cara Terreri

cara headshot

 

Cesarean Birth, Childbirth Education, Depression, Giving Birth with Confidence, Guest Posts, Infant Attachment, Newborns , , , , , ,

Best in Birth for 2014

December 30th, 2014 by avatar

By Cara Terreri, LCCE

Best of  BirthAs the year winds down this week, many will take stock of the best and worst of happenings throughout the year. In the world of maternity care, there are several notable and promising advances, discoveries, and recommendations in care practices. ICYMI (in case you missed it), we’d like to share the best in birth for 2014.

The Journal of Midwifery and Women’s Health released important new U.S. research on the outcomes of home birth entitled Outcomes of Care for 16,924 Planned Home Births in the United States: The Midwives Alliance of North America Statistics Project, 2004 to 2009.” This was the first study on outcomes of home births since 2005. For a in-depth review of the study, check out this and this.

In February, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine issued a joint Obstetric Care Consensus Statement: Safe Prevention of the Primary Cesarean Delivery. The statement aims to change the way practitioners manage labor in an effort to reduce the cesarean rate, and was considered by many a major game changer in how women are cared for in labor. The ACOG press release is here, which provides more detail of the study. Science & Sensibility covered it here.

Evidence Based Birth a well-respected resource site for birth practices, published the article, “Evidence for the Vitamin K Shot in Newborns,” which examines Vitamin K deficiency bleeding (VKDB), a rare but serious consequence of insufficient Vitamin K in a newborn or infant that can be prevented by administering an injection of Vitamin K at birth. The article helps to clear up many misconceptions and questions surrounding the Vitamin K shot.  Sharon Muza interviews Rebecca on this topic here.

Lamaze International launched a series of online parent classes that cover a variety of topics on pregnancy, birth, and breastfeeding. The online classes are presented in an interactive, engaging format with unlimited access so you can complete the class at your own pace. They provide vital information, and are recommended to be followed up with a traditional, in-depth childbirth class. Topics covered include, VBAC, Six Healthy Birth Practices, and Breastfeeding Basics.  A Pain Management and Coping Skills class will be released shortly in the new year.

The journal Birth published a study that compared the difference between nonpharmacologic (aka: non-drug) pain management during labor with more typical pain relief techniques. Results showed that nonpharmacologic pain relief techniques can reduce the need for medical interventions. Read an in-depth review here.

The “family-centered cesarean” birth continued to emerge as an option for more families as new providers and hospitals adopted practices to facilitate the approach. For more information, check out the Family Centered Cesarean Project and this article.

Out-of-hospital (OOH) births rates continued to increase, according to a report from the National Center for Health Statistics released this year. The report also showed that OOH births generally had lower risk than hospital births, with lower percentages of preterm birth and low birth weight.

Work continued on human microbiome (aka: healthy gut bacteria) research, and further investigation is underway on the impact of cesarean birth and infant gut bacteria colonization, and the potential benefits of artificially transferring mother’s bacteria to baby.

What other groundbreaking maternal infant topics do you feel made a big leap in 2014?  Share the topic and any relevant links in our comments section.

About Cara Terreri

cara headshotCara began working with Lamaze two years before she became a mother. Somewhere in the process of poring over marketing copy in a Lamaze brochure and birthing her first child, she became an advocate for childbirth education. Three kids later (and a whole lot more work for Lamaze), Cara is the Site Administrator for Giving Birth with Confidence, the Lamaze blog for and by women and expectant families. Cara continues to have a strong passion for the awesome power and beauty in pregnancy and birth, and for helping women to discover their own power and ability through birth. It is her hope that through the GBWC site, women will have a place to find and offer positive support to other women who are going through the amazing journey to motherhood.

ACOG, Childbirth Education, Evidence Based Medicine, Guest Posts, Lamaze International, New Research , ,

Series: Journey to LCCE Certification – Mission Accomplished!

December 4th, 2014 by avatar

By Cara Terreri, LCCE

 photo credit: kevin dooley via photopin cc

photo credit: kevin dooley via photopin cc

If you have been following Cara Terreri in our Series: Journey to LCCE Certification, you know Cara was last seen hard at work preparing for the LCCE examination.  I received good news from Cara yesterday, and wanted to share her update with you.  Please join me in congratulating Cara on successfully passing the Lamaze exam and receiving the credentials “LCCE”.  I would like to congratulate all of you who also received news of your passing score.  You should be proud of your accomplishments.  If others would like to explore becoming a Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, please check out our certification page on the website for information on how to start. – Sharon Muza, Science & Sensibility Community Manager.

The final days

At the culmination of nearly two years, the longest part of which was the last five weeks waiting to hear news, the results are in… I passed the exam and am now a Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator! Though I felt confident in my knowledge and abilities, self-doubt crept in during the weeks leading up to the exam. I amped up my studying and review time in order to feel more sure in my knowledge. Walking through the door of the testing site, my nerves took a back seat and I felt ready.

My test experience

My test-taking experience was, overall, positive. Many of the questions were reasonable and fair, and for a good number of them, I quickly found the answer. For other questions, however, I really had to closely read the question and think hard about my answer. I could always narrow it down to two answers – it was those last two that really tested my knowledge! The testing system allows you to “flag” a question if it’s one you want to go back and review. Two hours into the exam, I was finished answering questions. I was more than thankful for the additional hour to review the questions I had flagged. For two questions, I felt strongly about sending feedback to staff, a feature available to me during the test.  This feature made me feel like the test was truly created to be fair and open to my feedback. When the test results were released, I was pleased to see that a question had been eliminated, and I was hopeful that it might have been one of the questions I flagged.

Lamaze core values

cara lcceLamaze prides itself on promoting evidence based information and the LCCE exam is no different – questions are created fairly (not intentionally tricky), and cover a wide range of in-depth information that a competent and effective childbirth educator should possess. As someone who writes on behalf of Lamaze for parents everywhere, and as a budding educator and doula, holding the LCCE credential is invaluable. It provides added credibility, yes, but perhaps more importantly, it holds me accountable. Ongoing education is so critical in our field! Throughout the years since working with Lamaze, I’ve come to learn so much about the organization in comparison to others. It’s the level of dedication and commitment to education that encourages me to grow further with Lamaze as my foundation.

What’s next

Now that the exam is complete, the real work begins! Since moving and settling into a new community, I now am ready to create a business plan for 2015 and begin teaching locally. My earlier professional goals centered around doula work, but until I can solidify extended child care, that will have to wait. Teaching classes, however, is very doable and it’s also something I truly enjoy.

Did you also pass the exam?  Share your good news in our comments section and let us know what your next steps are!  Where will you be teaching?  What type of classes?  Let us knw! We want to celebrate with you and wish you all the best as you start your work as an LCCE. – SM

About Cara Terreri

Cara began working with Lamaze two years before she became a mother. Somewhere in the process of poring over marketing copy in a Lamaze brochure and birthing her first child, she became an advocate for childbirth education. Three kids later (and a whole lot more work for Lamaze), Cara is the Site Administrator for Giving Birth with Confidence, the Lamaze blog for and by women and expectant families. Cara continues to have a strong passion for the awesome power and beauty in pregnancy and birth, and for helping women to discover their own power and ability through birth. It is her hope that through the GBWC site, women will have a place to find and offer positive support to other women who are going through the amazing journey to motherhood.

 

Childbirth Education, Guest Posts, Lamaze International, Series: Journey to LCCE Certification , , ,

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