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The PregSense Monitor: A useful new tool or fear-based marketing

August 18th, 2015 by avatar

By Deena Blumenfeld, ERYT, RPYT, LCCE 

pregsensePart of a parent’s job description is to worry about their children. In doing so, parents can help the child maintain their physical health and their emotional wellbeing. However, when the line is crossed into fear based parenting; they may become overprotective to the point of stifling a child’s natural curiosity and the need to learn by making mistakes. They are then at risk of becoming “helicopter parents”.

This is an issue of control. When parents take full control, of their child’s overall well being, they feel that they are protecting them from all the negative aspects of the world. This is a fallacy.

Advertisers and marketers play into this fear and the need for control, that feeds into the parents’ feelings of limited or lack of control. Companies create and market products that provide the impression of safety and security. These products provide a false sense of control for parents, which furthers the illusion that they are doing something “good” or “right” as they “protect” their baby.

Making the rounds of Facebook, and other social media feeds, was this nifty little video about an at-home, wearable baby monitor. It’s called the PregSense Monitor by Nuvo Group. The general consensus from the online community, both mothers and professionals alike, was “Wow! This is amazing! We’ll save so many babies this way!”

My own reaction was a bit different. I’m a skeptic at heart and like all Lamaze educators; I’m a big fan of evidence based products, treatments, procedures and medications. So, I knew I needed to learn more about the PregSense monitor. What’s the evidence behind it? Would it really meet expectations, and save babies and reduce moms’ anxiety?

I attempted to contact Nuvo Group for an interview, but I have not received a response from them at the time of this writing.

Nuvo Group claims

The Israeli tech firm hopes the device will reassure anxious mothers like Michal, in week 32 of her pregnancy, who require monitoring without having to see her doctor.

Claim:  “(The monitor will) allay mothers’ fears by transmitting data about the health of the mother and fetus.”

  • It appears to monitor all of the mother’s vital signs, not unlike a Fitbit or other activity tracker. But how does having the knowledge about your own vital signs and getting additional information about baby’s activities reduce fear?
  • What if the monitor malfunctions? What does that do to a mother’s level of fear?
    • Can one make the assumption that if the monitor isn’t picking up the baby, the mother will become more worried, rather than less. This might lead to increased health care provider visits and further unnecessary medical testing.
  • Could wearing this monitor increase anxiety and potentially cause mothers to be so focused on the monitor it becomes a bit of an obsession?
    • Mothers may become hypervigilant and reliant on the constant stream of “data” available to be reviewed.
  • How would a mother feel if she was unable to wear the monitor one day? Would that increase her fears, even if those fears were unfounded?
    • Removing access, even for a short time could increase worry and interefere with a mother’s ability to continue her daily activities.
  • When there is a constant stream of data it becomes easy to tune out the information. Wouldn’t that defeat the purpose of this device?
    • The information may become white noise and fade into the background, because it’s a nonstop stream.

Claim: Mothers can connect, see and hear the fetus whenever they want, without needing to consult a doctor.

  • Do mothers need a device to help them connect with their babies?
    • This product is trying to create a consumer need that does not exist.
    • Mothers connect with their babies all the time by feeling their movements; talking to them; touching their growing bellies, etc. Would the device reduce this natural mother/fetus interaction? Would a mother be more likely to turn to her smartphone for results from the monitor instead of paying attention to what her baby is actually doing throughout the rhythm of the day.?
  • Using this device would require a health care provider to be monitoring all of these women, all the time. This doesn’t take into account staffing levels or time to complete the task. 24/7 monitoring would be a massive time commitment and responsibility.
  • What about additional liability for the health care provider for not monitoring a woman properly or correctly identifying a problem?
    • We live in a very litigious society. A care provider might be facing a lawsuit if the data from the monitor is not evaluated regularly and an anomaly was missed.
  • Since there are two monitor types – the clinical monitor and the consumer monitor, this raises additional questions. What if the mother is low-risk and healthy, but chooses to wear the consumer model, without a prescription to “reassure” herself that all is well?
    • Would the physician then be required to monitor this mother, if there is no medical need and was not advised by the physician?
    • What is the physician’s liability in this case?

Claim: “We will be able to analyze this data to predict about events of pregnancy, like preterm labor, like preeclampsia and more and we will be able to intervene in the right time…”

  • Preterm labor may be able to be detected with continuous monitoring. However, the monitor is only identifying contractions. It’s not looking at vaginal discharge, cervical change, flu-like symptoms or downward pressure from the baby.
  • Would the monitor be able to tell the difference between Braxton-Hicks contractions and early labor?
    • The limited information on Nuvo Group’s website and in their press release does not provide enough information to say for sure.
  • What about those women who experience Braxton-Hicks regularly throughout pregnancy but are not in labor? Would the monitor be helpful or harmful for them in identifying mothers in preterm labor? Would they be in and out of their care provider’s offices more frequently, causing disruption to their daily lives?
  • Preeclampsia cannot be prevented at this time. So, at best, the monitor would let the mother and her care provider know that her blood pressure is high. It would not test for protein in her urine, swelling in her face, headaches, vision changes or any of the other symptoms of preeclampsia, so it’s an incomplete test. Would preeclampsia be missed because mother’s blood pressure is borderline and no other tests were administered.

Claim: Regarding monitoring high risk mothers with continuous monitoring in hospital; the monitor will benefit the health care provider by replacing a bulky machine with one that is lightweight and not connected to the wall.

  • We already have telemetry units for Electronic Fetal Monitoring (EFM), in many hospitals. This device is now redundant and may not integrate with the current software used to monitor the EFM units.
  • How much will this cost a hospital to replace all of their current EFM units by purchasing these PregSense clinical monitors? Is the financial outlay for a new convenience worth the expense?
  • Does the new monitor increase safety for mother and baby in comparison to traditional EFM. Is this alternative truly better for mothers and for doctors in an in-patient setting? Where are the studies that compare the two options? Is the data we get any better? Or are we still subject to human interpretation of the data in identifying the appropriate course of action?

Claim: The PregSense monitor is safer than ultrasounds that can cause tissue damage

nuvo-ritmo-beats-pregsenseAt this point in time there is no evidence and no research, to support monitoring mothers at home during pregnancy. All of the literature refers to full time electronic fetal monitoring (EFM) during labor. Therefore my assumptions are based off of that literature.

Consensus among professional and governmental groups is that, based on the evidence, intermittent auscultation is safer to use in healthy women with uncomplicated pregnancies than electronic fetal monitoring (EFM).  (Heelan 2013) These professional groups include ACOG and AWHONN.

The issue with the beneficial claims made by Nuvo Group is they are in opposition to what the research finds for routine continuous EFM. Continuous EFM in low risk mothers provides no benefit for babies and increases the risk of cesarean for mothers. Therefore the whole concept of the PregSense Monitor is based on an erroneous assumption. It is not possible to prevent a problem by monitoring the baby. A problem can only be detected as it is occurring. So, even if a problem is observed while doing at home monitoring, by the time the mother makes it to the hospital it is may be too late to intervene effectively.

There is also the risk of false positive results. The monitor may detect an anomaly that then increases the mother’s fear about her baby’s well being only to be examined to find out that her baby is doing just fine, causing undue stress and panic.

The claims of the manufacturer of this product don’t hold up under current EFM guidelines and are not FDA approved.

Simplifying fetal monitoring for the care provider may not actually be the case when we look at 24/7 monitoring which still needs to be interpreted by a human being and a potentially large financial investment for a hospital that already has an EFM system that is adequate.

The claim that this product is safer than what currently exists with today’s EFM technology and ultrasonography is unsubstantiated. Without proper research, we do not know if it is safer, more harmful or neutral in relation to EFM and ultrasound as they are done today.

Resolving mother’s fears and helping her connect with the baby are at best an assumption regarding the “softer side” of the product’s results. It may be that some women do have greater piece of mind and feel a greater connection with their baby when using the device. Selling a feeling does not provide medical benefit to mother or baby. It is, however, good marketing.

The takeaway for your students is to have them look at all products with a discerning eye. Fear based marketing is insidious and plays to their emotions. They need to be making informed decisions based on accurate and evidence based information, rather than an emotional response to something that hits them in the heart.

References:

 Nuvo Group’s website

Reuters, “Wearable device provides continuous fetal monitoring”

Dekker, Rebecca, Evidence Based Fetal Monitoring, 2012

Dekker, Rebecca, What is the Evidence for Fetal Monitoring on Admission, 2012

FDA, Avoid Fetal “Keepsake” Images, Heartbeat Monitors, 2014

FDA, Ultrasound Imaging

ACOG Practice Bulletin #106, “Intrapartum Fetal Heart Rate Monitoring: Nomenclature, Interpretation, and General Management Principles,”, July 2009

ACOG press release, ACOG Refines Fetal Heart Rate Monitoring Guidelines, 2009

Lisa Heelan, MSN, FNP-BC, Fetal Monitoring: Creating a Culture of Safety With Informed Choice, J Perinat Educ. 2013 Summer; 22(3): 156–165.

 

 

 

ACOG, Babies, Fetal Monitoring, Guest Posts, Medical Interventions, News about Pregnancy , , , ,

Meet Joan Combellick – Lamaze/ICEA Conference Plenary Speaker

August 13th, 2015 by avatar

The Lamaze International-ICEA 2015 Joint Conference is a little more than a month away and I am excited about all of the learning opportunities and connections that will be happening in Las Vegas.  I remember attending the last Lamaze-ICEA joint conference five years ago and it was very memorable.  Over the next month, I would like to introduce you to the four plenary speakers at the conference. We are lucky to have these experts sharing their wisdom and expertise with us.  Today, we meet Joan Combellick, CM, MSN, MPH.  Joan is a midwife and researcher who is interested in the microbiome and the newborn.  She will be sharing relevant information about this new field of research and how it is related to birth in her plenary session: Watchful Waiting Revisited: Birth Experience and the Neonatal Microbiome.  Meet Joan in this brief interview as she shares some thoughts on her topic.  Join us in Las Vegas to hear the session and learn more about this important new field of research.  To register for the conference and find out more about the Lamaze International – ICEA 2015 Joint Conference visit the conference website.

Sharon Muza: The microbiome and the newborn have been getting lots of attention in the mainstream press in recent months. Parents are coming to class with lots of questions about this topic for their childbirth educator. What do you think are the most common questions expectant families might have on this topic as they prepare to birth?

joan combellick head shotJoan Combellick: I have found it is a topic that is variably known and understood among the women I care for. Many have never heard the term microbiome and think about bacteria primarily as “germs” that we need to rid ourselves of through the use of bactericidal wipes or soap, etc. With these women it is important to start with the concept that bacteria is not always dangerous, rather we actually need and depend on the trillions of bacteria living in all different parts of our bodies. Further, that initial bacterial colonization at birth and in the newborn period is an important developmental process.

 Other women have done extensive reading on the subject. With these women it is important to help ground their knowledge in the current state of the science. For example, the lasting effects of probiotic supplements are not well understood or documented. The relationship between alterations in the newborn microbiome and subsequent disorders, such as asthma and allergies, is an association only, not a causal relationship. The exact characteristics of a “healthy” microbiome for any given person have not yet been clearly defined. These are just a few examples of areas within microbiome research that need further illumination.

SM: How should the childbirth educator respond when parents ask these questions?

JC: I think it is important to reflect this is an emerging science with much more to come. There is a lot of media attention on this topic right now, much of which suggests that the microbiome is the key to all human health. But many answers are still out. Certainly it seems the microbiome may play a role in shaping human health or disease, yet health promotion and disease prevention must also be recognized as a multi-factorial processes.  

SM: What role do childbirth educators play in helping families to understand the role of the microbiome on their newborn?

JC: Childbirth educators are uniquely positioned to engage with women and their families in deep and meaningful ways on microbiome-related issues, as they are with many issues related to pregnancy and birth. This is a new topic for health care providers as well as women receiving care and I suspect it is not very thoroughly discussed during pregnancy, partly due to lack of knowledge on the part of health care providers, but also partly due to lack of time during typical prenatal appointments. Childbirth educators can very effectively open this discussion with women, respond to questions and clarify concerns and practices. They can also support women in a more active pursuit of information and a more robust discussion on this topic with their health care providers.

SM: What changes have you observed in families’ choices and birth preparation plans as their awareness of the importance of their newborn’s microbiome increases?

JC: In my clinical work I have had only one patient who underwent a scheduled cesarean delivery for breech presentation ask for help in exposing her infant to vaginal bacteria. She had already done research on this experimental intervention and carried it out largely on her own. I mostly just helped her navigate the hospital environment while she did so..

I have encountered many women taking pre-, pro-, or syn-biotics, though their goals in taking these supplements is not well defined.

SM: Do you think that hospitals are recognizing and addressing this issue with changes in procedures and protocols that support a healthy microbiome in all the babies born in their facilities?

JC: I believe there is very little discussion about this topic and I have not seen any changes in procedures and protocols at the institutions where I work. I think there is openness on the part of providers to learn more, but I think demand for information from women receiving care may actually lead the way on this.

SM: If families could do one thing prenatally and during labor to help ensure their newborn’s microbiome is the healthiest it could be, what would that one thing be?

JC: Follow a path of normal pregnancy, labor and childbirth to the fullest extent possible. When medications or interventions are suggested, understand why they are medically necessary. Avoid interventions done electively or without medical reason.

SM: How has what you know and have studied about the importance of the newborn’s microbiome changed the way you practice?

skin_to_skinJC: I try to scrutinize all of my own clinical practice more thoroughly in both big and small ways. For example, have I made sure that mother and baby have prolonged skin to skin contact immediately after delivery? Have I educated women to the fullest extent possible about the benefits of breastfeeding and then do I offer the practical support that is needed in the first weeks after delivery when breastfeeding is established? Do I need to prescribe that antibiotic prenatally, or is this a case when watchful waiting is more appropriate? Am I at all times following protocols that prioritize vaginal delivery whenever safe for mother and baby?

SM: It has often been suggested that it takes 17 years to go from “bench to bedside,” when the research can be applied to wide-spread clinical procedures. What do you think can be done by both professionals and consumers to speed this process along as it pertains to the microbiome and the newborn?

JC: As educators and clinicians it is our responsibility to stay up to date on the most current research. But this is often difficult. Professionals and consumers alike can speed this process by opening the discussion, just asking questions and pursuing answers. This can help everyone learn more about the topic and most importantly, insure the most up to date care is given and received. Women should always feel empowered to lead the discussion about this topic with their care providers.

SM: What are you looking forward to most about being a plenary speaker and presenting to the Lamaze/ICEA 2015 conference attendees?

JC: I am both a midwife and a researcher. In my clinical world, I know that it is very difficult to stay up to date on current research. And in my research world, I know that research is all too often not well informed by clinical practice. The two worlds often have a lot of distance between them. This is an exciting conference to me because it is an opportunity to bring research and care together. I hope to clearly present the research I am working on, but I also hope to be better informed about the issues childbirth educators encounter in their work. Childbirth educators often have the best opportunity to know the concerns, knowledge and practices of women and their families. I very much look forward to the sharing of information in all directions.

SM: Is there anything else you would like to share with the readers of Science & Sensibility and attendees at the upcoming conference?

JC: We have observed alterations in newborn bacterial development that are associated with interventions used at or around the time of birth (such as cesarean delivery, antibiotic use, and formula feeding). Further, these alterations have been associated with subsequent health outcomes like obesity, allergy, eczema, asthma, and diabetes. While all of these interventions can be truly life saving when used appropriately, it is also clear that in the US and around the world the use of cesarean delivery, antibiotic treatment and formula feeding is occurring at rates that vastly exceed what is medically necessary. It is important for women to ask for and be told in a way they understand the true medical indication for any and all interventions. It is also important for women to understand that birth is not something that should be scheduled into a busy calendar merely as a matter of convenience. Microbiome research suggests that our normal human birth process, as variable and unpredictable as it may be, is important to promote and protect to the fullest extent possible.

 

 

 

2015 Conference, 2015 Lamaze & ICEA Joint Conference, Babies, Childbirth Education, Lamaze International, New Research, Newborns , , , ,

Series: Building Your Birth Business – Using Facebook Ads to Advertise Your Birth Business

August 11th, 2015 by avatar

By Janelle Durham, MSW, LCCE

Building Your Birth Business- Using FacebookToday we have another post in the Building Your Birth Business series.  You may be interested in growing your own independent childbirth education or birth related business.  Maybe you already have such a business already established but are looking to take it to the next level. Even if you work for a hospital or organization, this information is useful as well, if they are looking to expand their reach.  Today’s post by author and educator Janelle Durham, MSW, LCCE, helps you to understand Facebook Ads and how to customize them.  Targeted to your specific audience, Facebook Ads can increase traffic to your website or Facebook page where families can learn more about your services. You can find all the posts in this series here– Sharon Muza,  Science & Sensibility Community Manager

Facebook ads let you write an ad that appears on someone’s Facebook feed. So, as they’re scrolling through for news of their friend’s adventures, they see your ad. This is a good way to raise awareness of your services. For $10, you can put your ad in front of about 800 people, and about 15 of them will click through to learn more. But, the best part is that you can target these ads to very specific demographics, like expectant parents who live in Monroe, Washington. You don’t waste money showing it to anyone who doesn’t fit that description. (Unlike that newspaper ad, which is mostly read by retirees.)

Note, this type of ad raises awareness of your business. I can’t guarantee it will get you clients and students! When someone was reading Facebook, they weren’t necessarily looking for a doula or a childbirth class, so they may not immediately click through and call you up. But, you have increased the chance they’ll do that in the future. It’s worth $10.

Here’s How to Create a Facebook Ad

First, if you don’t already have a Facebook page, create one here. (Here are some tips on pages for businesses.)

Then, log on to your page

Click on Create ad (it probably displays on your left sidebar under the heading “pages” or it might appear on the top right corner of your page)

It will ask you what kinds of results you want to get: choose ‘clicks to website’. Paste in the website address. (Make sure you choose the specific page you’ll want them to land on on YOUR website.)

Defining Your Audience

durham fb audience-definition

There’s lots of variables you can adjust here. Each changes the potential total audience for the ad – the total number of Facebook users who fit the description you’ve chosen.

Keep an eye on the little “audience definition” meter on the right hand side, and also, at the bottom of that column, it will tell you “potential reach” of your ad. Make choices, and see what gets you to the number you want… it usually takes a little experimentation to get it just right. I have found that if I spend $10 on an ad, it’s typically going to be displayed to about 800 – 1200 people, so I’m looking to narrow my demographics down to a total potential audience in the range of 2000 – 4000 people who are the closest possible match I can get to who I’m looking for. I won’t reach them all, but I’ll reach a good percentage of them. This gives me the best bang for my buck. If you had a bigger budget, you would want higher numbers for potential audience.

  • Location. Where it says “Include”, type your city in. It will then offer to do a radius around that city (you’ll see that it says “Carnation+25 miles”). You can adjust that. Next to “+25 miles”, there’s an arrow for a drop-down menu. You can adjust the radius there. You can also exclude things. Like for Carnation, I want everyone in the Snoqualmie Valley to see it (the rural areas north, east, and south of Carnation). But, I know no one from Seattle, Bellevue, Kirkland or Redmond (urban areas) is going to drive to Carnation for a class! Note, when excluding cities, choose “no radius”.

durham fb location

  • Age. You can limit by age group. I’m trying to reach expectant parents, and parents of very young children. While we welcome teen and young adult parents, we have found they don’t usually sign up, so, since my advertising dollar is limited, I target to age 24 and up. On the older side, I set it at 46 or so. (There is an irony in this, since I’m a 48 year old mom of a preschooler…) Note: Ad targeting is NOT about who is welcome or not welcome in our classes!! It’s about focusing our ads on the type of people most likely to be looking for a program like ours.
  • Gender: It’s a stereotype, but likely true, that moms make more decisions about classes than dads do. I do both genders if that gets my audience to the right size, but if I really want to target my ads for best value, I limit to women.
  • Language: I generally leave blank. It will go to anyone in my area, no matter their primary language.
  • More demographics: there’s a LOT of choices here. Some examples: Home >> Household Composition >> Children in Home or Parents >> All Parents >> (0 – 12 months): New Parents or Parents >> Moms >> Stay-at-home moms
    • Note: when you write your ad, think about who you’re going to target. For example, if you’re targeting to “stay at home moms” vs. “parents 0 – 3 years” your ad might be written differently. SAHM might not click on an ad for a preschool if they think of preschools as a 5 day a week thing… so your ad might say something about it being ‘2 mornings a week – great opportunity for a little social interaction for you and your child’.
    • For childbirth classes, I might choose married or partnered. Again, I’m not trying to be biased here… single parents are VERY welcome in the classes, but again, if I have limited ad dollars, I know that partnered moms are more likely to choose to enroll in a class…
  • Interests: You could choose people who are interested in Family and Relationships, and that gets you people who have “liked” pages about Family and Relationships
  • Behaviors. Again, there are lots of things to choose from here. I have tried targeting a preschool ad to Purchase Types >> Baby products and had similar results (click-through rates) to when I targeted at parents of kids 0 – 12 months. Note: use EITHER the “more demographics” section OR “Interests and Behaviors.” If you use both, the ad will only go to people who fit all the descriptions in both sections, and that usually limits your audience too much.

How Much Do You Want to Spend

Now you need to choose your budget. I do the lifetime budget. That refers to the lifetime/lifespan of the ad. I’ve been generally running $10-20 lifetime budget. Then set your start and end dates. I run ads for about 5 days.

durham fb ad budget

Bidding and Pricing

I “optimize for clicks to website” and “get the most website clicks at the best price” and “run ads all the time” and delivery type standard.

Create Your Ad

It asks “How do you want your ad to look.” Although the “multiple images in one ad” is interesting, let’s make it simple now, and choose “a single image”

Then it asks “What creative would you like to use”. Choose “select images”. It will automatically upload some pictures from your website, but if those aren’t the ones you want to use, you can delete them, and upload anything you want. You can choose multiple pictures, and it will randomly choose one whenever it runs an ad, so if you don’t have a single favorite picture, that’s a fine option. You can “crop” the images to make sure they’re displaying the part of the photo you want to display.

durham fb ad ad-design

In the Text and Links section:

  • On Connect Facebook page, make sure it lists the correct page
  • On headline and text, it may have auto-filled the title and description from your webpage. You’ll almost always want to change this for an ad to make them as appealing as possible.
  • Headline: usually this would be the name of your program (25 characters or less)
  • Text: Wants to be a clear, engaging overview of your program, with perhaps an invitation (join us, check us out, be a part, etc.). You’ve only got 90 characters, so make them count.
  • Note: On the mobile ads, all that appears is: name of your Facebook page / text / headline / web address. So, make sure that the text works well in this context as well as on desktop news feed. (Many more people will see your mobile ad than your desktop ad!! 48% of Facebook users access it ONLY on mobile devices; many more use a mixture of mobile and desktop) So, I make sure it includes location, age group – those sorts of key information that tell viewers whether the ad applies to them.
  • Call to Action: Choose one. I like “learn more” or “sign up”
  • Click “show advanced options”, and it will give you a box for news feed link description. You definitely want to use this, as it gives you an opportunity to provide lots more info for those viewing it on a desktop. It’s 200 characters. I use it for a longer summary of the program.
  • Once you’ve done this, make sure you look at the previews for desktop feed, mobile devices, right column display and mobile apps to make sure you’re happy with all versions of the ad.
  • Then place order.

What results will you get?

It’s really hard for me to predict that. It depends on what market you’re trying to reach, what your product is and so on. I also think that what results I’m getting in August of 2015 may be different in August 2016. I just don’t know how yet. Facebook ads are somewhat new, they’re REALLY easy, really cheap, and get good results. So, a lot of people are using them right now. If that use increases so much that Facebook users get sick of ads, we might see a backlash, and worse results, or Facebook may continue to evolve tools that get even better results. All I can tell you is what I’ve seen with my market, my product, in summer 2014 and 2015.

I’ve been running ads for our program: classes for parents and babies, parents and toddlers, and cooperative preschools. For each audience, I’ve targeted as described in the directions above, with some minor adjustments. For each type of class I spent $10, and had a potential audience from about 2000 – 7000 people. For each of the ads, they’ve been displayed to approximately 800 – 1100 people. The clicks to the website ranged from 8 – 35 per program. Click through rates ranged from 1%. Cost per click ranged from 27 cents to $1.25. So, as an approximation, I figure can get about 15 clicks for $10.

I advertised my blog, More Good Days to a national audience. Married women, age 24 – 44, parents of kids 0 – 3 years old. That’s a potential audience of over a million. I knew I was only going to reach a very small fraction of those. But that was OK… I wanted to reach people all over, under the hope that maybe if someone in Minnesota liked it, she’d tell her friends, and so would someone in New Mexico and so on. I spent $30. Ad displayed to 5200, 79 clicked through. That’s a click-through rate of 1.5%, at a cost-per-click of 38 cents.

I did an ad for our program where instead of setting the goal of what kind of results I wanted to “clicks to website” I chose “Promote your page.” (For some programs, this is a better option than clicks… a click just gets them to look at your website once and take action or not on that day. But if they like your Facebook page, then every time you post something, it appears on their Facebook feed, so you get repeated exposures.) I targeted that ad to expectant parents and parents of kids 0 – 3 in 4 nearby cities. Potential audience of 17,600. I spent $14. Ad displayed to 2443 people (14% of audience). 11 liked the page (my goal), 2 liked the post. That’s a click-through rate of 0.7% and a cost-per-like of $1.20.

I primarily choose ads that are optimized for clicks to website. I find that some of the people who see that ad choose to go to our Facebook page to check us out, and some choose to like the page based on that. In one week of running ads, where our ads were displayed to 11,000 people, we gained 22 likes on our Facebook page as a side effect of those ads.

Setting up your first ad will take you 30 – 45 minutes. It gets faster after that! I can do one in 5 – 10. Try experimenting with one today!

To learn more about online advertising, check out my website at www.janelledurham.com.

Have you had previous experience using Facebook Ads and would like to add some additional information?  Do you think you will give these simple and affordable ad options a try?  Share your experience now or after your first round of ads and let us know how it goes in the comments section below. – SM

About Janelle Durham

Janelle headshotJanelle Durham, MSW, LCCE, has taught childbirth preparation, breastfeeding, and newborn care for 16 years. She trains childbirth educators for the Great Starts program at Parent Trust for Washington Children, and teaches young families through Bellevue College’s Parent Education program. She is a co-author of Pregnancy, Childbirth, and the Newborn and writes blogs/websites on: pregnancy & birth; breastfeeding and newborn care; and parenting toddlers & preschoolers. Contact Janelle at jdurham@parenttrust.org.

Childbirth Education, Guest Posts, Series: Building Your Birth Business , , , , , , ,

Happy World Breastfeeding Week – The Celebration Continues with More Free Resources!

August 6th, 2015 by avatar

JHL august 2015

Resources continue to be made available during World Breastfeeding Week that will benefit the childbirth educator, doula, lactation consultant, midwife and other professionals as they educate, support and provide assistance to families who are planning to continue to breastfeed and return to work.  Check out today’s resource list.

Free Journal of Human Lactation articles

In honor of worldwide celebrations of World Breastfeeding Week and the theme “Breastfeeding and Work- Let’s Make It Work, the Journal of Human Lactation has made the following ten research articles available for free during the month of August 2015 to anyone interested in reading them.

The Journal of Human Lactation is a quarterly, peer-reviewed journal publishing original research, insights in practice and policy, commentaries, and case reports relating to research and practice in human lactation and breastfeeding. JHL is relevant to lactation professionals in clinical practice, public health, research, and a broad range of fields related to the trans-disciplinary field of human lactation.

Hat tip to Lactation Matters for the heads up on this generous offer from JHL..

Screenshot 2015-08-05 20.22.25Free iMothering Webinar with Nancy Mohrbacher

Nancy Mohrbacher, IBCLC, FILCA, an expert in the field of breastfeeding, and author of several books on breastfeeding including Breastfeeding Solutions: Quick Tips for the Most Common Nursing Challenges, (which was reviewed previously on Science & Sensibility) has a free online webinar for families and professionals on on iMothering.com titled –  Working and Breastfeeding Made Simple.

© Nancy Mohrbacher

© Nancy Mohrbacher

Free Downloadable Resource for Caregivers of Breastfeeding Infants

Additionally, Nancy has shared a super resource that breastfeeding families can share with the caregivers of their nurslings, to help them understand how they can best help and support the breastfeeding working parent when they are watching the child as the caregiver. Check out this printable For the Caregiver of a Breastfed Baby and let families know they can share this with their child’s caregiver to provide accurate information on how best to feed the breastfed baby while s/he is with their caregiver.

Do you have any resources that you have found helpful during this WBW celebration?  I invite you to share and link to them in the comments section so we can all benefit.  Thanks in advance!

Breastfeeding, Childbirth Education, Newborns, Push for Your Baby , , , , ,

Breastfeeding and Work- Let’s Make It Work! Join Science & Sensibility in Celebrating World Breastfeeding Week

August 4th, 2015 by avatar

wbw2015-logo-purpleAugust 1-7th, 2015 is World Breastfeeding Week and is coordinated by the World Alliance for Breastfeeding Action (WABA).  WABA is a global network of individuals & organizations concerned with the protection, promotion & support of breastfeeding worldwide.  World Breastfeeding Week is traditionally celebrated annually the first week of August and this year’s theme – “Breastfeeding and Work- Let’s Make It Work!

As childbirth educators and birth professionals, we are working with expectant families in the weeks and months leading up to birth, and then often in the early weeks of parenting.  During that time, returning to work is often a distant thought, as families struggle to navigate the labor and birth experience and transition to life with a new baby.  Most of the breastfeeding topics we cover in class and one-on-one with families are of the need to know variety that helps them get breastfeeding off to a good start.  If there is even enough time to touch on returning to work as a breastfeeding parent, it is brief and quick due to time limitations and current concerns.

The reality is that most breastfeeding parents return to work.  This return to formal or informal work may occur earlier than parents would have liked due to financial concerns, lack of paid (or unpaid leave) from employers, professional pressures and expectations, as well as family and society demands.  The struggle to maintain an adequate supply of expressed breastmilk and to continue to breastfeed is real and affects many, many families worldwide.  Issues include an unsupportive workplace, insufficient time  and an inadequate or inappropriate place to express milk that can be bottle fed to their child, and an unwelcome environment to be able to nurse their child, if the child can be brought to the workplace.

Childbirth educators may not have time in our routine breastfeeding class to address many of the issues and concerns that these families face when they return to work.  The typical breastfeeding class is geared for the initial days and weeks with a newborn.  Educators can provide take home resources in the form of handouts and useful links that can help families to navigate returning to work successfully, minimizing impact on the breastfeeding dyad.

wbw2015-obj

Additionally, you might consider preparing a stand-alone class that runs a couple of hours geared specifically for the parent who is returning to work  and hoping to continue to breastfeed.  This might be offered for families to attend while still pregnant or after their baby arrives and they are facing the fact that they are going to be returning to work sooner rather than later.  Do you currently already teach such a class in your community?  How do you market it?  How is it received?  Can you share some of your objectives and favorite resources for the Return to Work class that you teach in our comments section below?

© Helen Regina - Policial WABA 2015

© Helen Regina – Policial WABA 2015

Continuing to breastfeed after returning to work benefits businesses as well as mothers, babies and families by providing a three to one Return on Investment (ROI) through lower health care costs, lower employee absenteeism rates due to babies that are healthier, requiring less sick leave, lower turnover rates, and higher employee productivity and loyalty.

Here is some useful information and resources that I have gathered in one location that you may want to share with your students and families, in order to help them make a smooth transition when they return to work as a breastfeeding family.

Many of these websites also provide information in Spanish and other languages as well.

Lamaze International President Robin Elise Weiss has created a new “From the President’s Desk” video – “Tips for Breastfeeding Success” that you can share with parents. While not specifically about breastfeeding while working, helping families get off on the right foot with a solid breastfeeding relationship can help parents to feel confident that they are meeting their baby’s nutritional needs right from the start and that can continue once they return to work.  You can also direct families to Lamaze International’s online breastfeeding class, where additional information and resources can be found.  Finally, consider encouraging parents to download our new free Pregnancy to Parenting app which contains evidence based and easily accessible information on many topics includingbreastfeeding as well as useful app features like a breastfeeding and diaper log and additional resources.

How are you celebrating World Breastfeeding Week in your community? Share your activities and ideas in the comments section below and thank you so much for all you do to support breastfeeding with the families you work with.

Babies, Breastfeeding, Childbirth Education, Infant Attachment, Lamaze International, Newborns, Push for Your Baby , , , , , , ,

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