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Book Review – Transformed by Postpartum Depression: Women’s Stories of Trauma and Growth, Part One

March 10th, 2015 by avatar

 By Cynthia Good Mojab, MS, LMHCA, IBCLC, RLC, CATSM

transformed cover

Walker Karraa, PhD, a former contributor to Science & Sensibility, has authored a new book, Transformed by Postpartum Depression: Women’s Stories of Trauma and Growth, that speaks to what lies on the other side for the 20 women she interviewed about their experiences with postpartum depression. Cynthia Good Mojab, MS, LMHCA, IBCLC, RLC, CATSM, who specializes in supporting people with postpartum mood and anxiety disorders and birth trauma presents a three-part series related to Dr. Karraa’s book. Today on the blog, Cynthia outlines the books content and its implications for practice. On Thursday, Cynthia shares her commentary on some of Dr. Karraa’s research and conclusions. Next week we are offered a glimpse into the person behind the book, when an interview with Dr. Karraa is shared with blog readers. Follow all three parts of this series on “Transformed by Postpartum Depression.” – Sharon Muza, Science & Sensibility Community Manager.

 In the last several decades, our awareness and understanding of postpartum depression have steadily increased. A wealth of research now exists regarding its prevalence, risk factors, prevention, symptoms, consequences, and treatment. Organizations, like Postpartum Support International and Postpartum Progress, champion the needs of families touched by postpartum depression and other perinatal mental health challenges, counter stigma, and contribute critical support and information to the safety net that all new families need and deserve. Many states in the United States have enacted legislation or developed projects related to public education, screening, and/or treatment for perinatal mental health challenges. And, at the national level in the US, the 2020 Mom Project seeks to remove institutional barriers that prevent depressed new mothers from being identified and accessing treatment.

In spite of this progress, we do not see the prevalence of postpartum depression dropping. Globally, it is as high as 82.1% when measured using self-reported questionnaires and as high as 26.3% when measured using structured clinical interviews (Norhayati, Nik Hazlina, Asrenee, & Wan Emilin, 2014). In fact, we see that depression during pregnancy and after birth routinely goes undetected and untreated (Miller et al., 2012). How is that possible? And, beyond the statistics that we have now amassed, what is it really like to experience postpartum depression, come out the other side, and make meaning from the experience?

Posttraumatic Growth after Postpartum Depression

In her new book, Transformed by Postpartum Depression: Women’s Stories of Trauma and Growth, Walker Karraa, PhD (2014) invites readers to join her in a touching and thought provoking exploration of the potentially transformative nature of postpartum depression. Her book, which is based on the findings of her dissertation research (Karraa, 2013), brings to light both the suffering and development that women can experience on this journey. In fact, her book is one of the fruits of her own transformation through her experience of severe postpartum depression. Parents, lay supporters, and perinatal care providers who appreciate the blend of research and women’s voices found in books like Depression in New Mothers: Causes, Consequences, and Treatment Alternatives (Kendall-Tackett, 2010) and Traumatic Childbirth (Beck, Driscoll, & Watson, 2013) will also appreciate Karraa’s book. It should certainly be considered “required reading” for perinatal care providers and lay supporters.

walker karraa head shot 2015Karraa begins with a brief review of the literature, including what postpartum depression is, who develops it, and its global prevalence, risk factors, and consequences. These facts and figures help orient the reader to the general nature and scope of a veritable global mental health pandemic. They also serve to illustrate the foundation of the dominant discourse regarding postpartum depression: an allopathic worldview that frames mental illness as pathology. The following five chapters, however, contribute to an expansion of that view by illustrating how postpartum depression can be experienced as a long and painful journey culminating in positive change.

In the course of conducting her qualitative research, Karraa used grounded theory to analyze the answers of 20 women to four questions (Karraa, 2013) about their experience of postpartum depression:

  • How would you describe your process of transformation through postpartum depression?
  • In what ways did you experience the process of transformation through postpartum depression?
  • What were the ways you saw yourself transforming?
  • How do you experience this transformation currently?

She uncovered five stages of transformation through postpartum depression: before, during, ending, after, and beyond. That the women described 1) feeling shocked by the nature and magnitude of their symptoms, 2) enduring physical and psychological disintegration to which care providers seemed oblivious, and 3) slowly finding a path toward recovery will strike a familiar chord for lay supporters, perinatal care providers, and individuals who have worked and/or lived with postpartum depression. What might not be familiar to all readers are the last two stages that Karraa identified: 4) an increase in self-care, self-confidence, authenticity, and compassion; improved relationships; and alteration of perception of self and purpose in the world; and 5) coming to view postpartum depression as resulting—paradoxically—in a profoundly positive transformation.

In her 7th chapter, Karraa gives the reader a thoughtful tour of her consideration of several theories that might explain her research participants’ experiences of transformation through postpartum depression. Ultimately, she recognized that the prolonged endurance of threat to their physical and psychological survival was so great that the women experienced postpartum depression as a traumatic life event and that the transformative nature of their experience of postpartum depression is, thus, an example of posttraumatic growth: “positive psychological change experienced as a result of the struggle with highly challenging life circumstances” (Tedeschi & Calhoun, 2004).

In chapter 8, Karraa shares the confirming feedback of four experts in the field of postpartum depression, including the illustrious Cheryl Tatano Beck, Jane Shakespeare-Finch, Karen Kleinman, and Jane Honikman. Then she closes with a chapter acknowledging that her work has revealed a connection that has been right under our noses waiting for us to formally notice and describe: postpartum depression is one of the adversities of life that can precipitate growth. Karraa researched, recognized, and named that connection. Naming an experience honors it. It also provides a language for new parents, lay supporters, perinatal care providers, and researchers to use as they seek to express, understand, provide support for, treat, recover from, and/or grow from the life-altering experience of postpartum depression. And, perhaps most importantly, it offers hope to those who are fighting their way back from the devastation of postpartum depression. Not only can recovery be found at the end of the darkest tunnel; transformation may await.

Care Provider Failure: A Call to Action

The power of Karraa’s book continues in its appendices, where she describes an informal survey that serves as an(other) urgent call to action for all of us: in spite of the high prevalence of postpartum depression and its negative consequences when untreated, we are collectively failing to help those who are experiencing it. Because so many women in her qualitative study reported that their care providers had failed to help them, Karraa conducted the Changing Depression Survey (n=486). When asked who was most responsible for their getting help for postpartum depression, 65.4% of her participants selected “Self,” 23.0% selected “Partner,” 16.9% selected “Family Member,” 11.7% selected “Medical Care Provider” (which includes OB/GYN, Midwife, General or Family Physician), 8.8% selected “Other (Friend),” and 6.6% selected “Therapist.” When asked who was least helpful in getting them help for postpartum depression, 43.2% of her participants selected “Medical Care Provider,” 21% reported “Family Members,” 20.6% reported “Partner,” 19.3% reported “Self,” and 6.8% reported “Therapist.”

While this is, admittedly, an informal survey, the patterns seen here match clinical experience as well as research findings that only a fraction of new mothers with postpartum depression are identified and treated (Milgrom & Gemmill, 2014). My own clients, who are new parents, frequently report finding me after seeing a series of care providers who did not formally screen or refer them for perinatal mental health challenges, did not informally ask them about how they are coping with new parenthood, and/or did not respond with sensitivity, validation, or assistance when they tried to share their struggles. A delay in diagnosis, support, and treatment can both worsen and prolong suffering for new parents struggling through postpartum depression. Karraa’s research suggests that, in some cases, it may also delay the experience of posttraumatic growth.

This call to action must be heard and effectively responded to by individuals as well as by institutions. Yes, perinatal care providers and lay supporters will benefit from reading Karraa’s book. But, reading the book is not the same as developing the skills to apply the book’s insights in practice. Her research is an invitation for organizations and credentialing institutions in the diverse fields that provide services to new families (e.g., childbirth education, doula care, midwifery, obstetrics, pediatrics, family practice medicine, lactation education, lactation consulting, counseling, social work, psychiatry, naturopathic medicine) to develop, offer, and require training related to perinatal mental health, including:

  • how to reduce stigma and increase awareness by educating expectant and new parents about perinatal mental health issues
  • why, when, and how to screen and refer
  • how to effectively provide care to new parents struggling with perinatal mental health challenges—including using approaches that incorporate an understanding of postpartum depression as potential transformation to be nurtured, not just as pathological symptoms to be eliminated.

Conclusion

Transformed by Postpartum Depression: Women’s Stories of Trauma and Growth consistently engages the reader with the poignant and inspiring stories of 20 women, as well as with the intriguing insights of the author and four experts in the field. The moving narratives and cogent analysis effectively describe the women’s experience of postpartum depression as traumatic and the transformation of their suffering into growth. The book also invites us to transcend the dominant view of postpartum depression as pure pathology and to learn how to take effective action to keep new parents struggling with perinatal mental health challenges from falling through the cracks. I congratulate Dr. Karraa on authoring a book that makes such a meaningful contribution to our understanding of postpartum depression and, refreshingly, offers a significant focus on recovery and development. Join me here on this blog on Thursday to read my commentary regarding frameworks that might explain her findings as well as my hopes for future research.

References

Beck, C., Driscoll, J., & Watson, S. (2013). Traumatic Childbirth. New York: Routledge.

Karraa, W. (2013). Changing Depression: A Grounded Theory of the Transformational Dimension of Postpartum Depression. (Doctoral dissertation). Retrieved from ProQuest/UMI. (3607747.)

Karraa, W. (2014). Transformed by Postpartum Depression: Women’s Stories of Trauma and Growth. Amarillo, TX: Praeclarus Press.

Kendall-Tackett, K. (2010). Depression in New Mothers: Causes, Consequences, and Treatment Alternatives. New York: Routledge.

Milgrom, J. & Gemmill, A. (2014). Screening for perinatal depression. Best Practice & Research Clinical Obstetrics & Gynaecology, 28(1), 13-23.

Miller, L., McGlynn, A., Suberlak, K., Rubin, L., Miller, M., & Pirec, V. (2012). Now What? Effects of On-Site Assessment on Treatment Entry After Perinatal Depression Screening. Journal of Women’s Health, 21(10), 1046-1052.

Norhayati, M., Nik Hazlina, N., Asrenee, A., & Wan Emilin, W. (2014). Magnitude and risk factors for postpartum symptoms: A literature review. Journal of Affective Disorders, 175C, 34-52.

Tedeschi, R. & Calhoun, L. (2004). Posttraumatic growth: Conceptual foundations and empirical evidence. Psychological Inquiry, 15(1), 1-18.

About Cynthia Good Mojab

cynthia good mojab headshot 2015Cynthia Good Mojab, MS Clinical Psychology, is a Clinical Counselor, International Board Certified Lactation Consultant, author, award-winning researcher, and internationally recognized speaker. She is the Director of LifeCircle Counseling and Consulting, LLC where she specializes in providing perinatal mental health care. Cynthia is Certified in Acute Traumatic Stress Management and is a member of the American Academy of Experts in Traumatic Stress and the National Center for Crisis Management. Her areas of focus include perinatal loss, grief, depression, anxiety, and trauma; lactational psychology; cultural competence; and social justice. She has authored, contributed to, and provided editorial review of numerous publications. Cynthia can be reached through her website.

Guest Posts, Infant Attachment, Maternal Mental Health, New Research, Perinatal Mood Disorders, Postpartum Depression, Research, Trauma work, Uncategorized , , , , , , ,

Thanks IBCLCs – For Helping New Families Meet Their Breastfeeding Goals

March 5th, 2015 by avatar

IBCLCDayLogo 2015(2)Yesterday was IBCLC Day – a special day set aside once a year to recognize the hard work and efforts that International Board Certified Lactation Consultants provide all all year long in support of breastfeeding for mothers, babies and really, the entire family.  IBCLC Day is sponsored by the International Lactation Consultant Association, a professional organization for IBCLCs around the world.

Becoming an IBCLC is no easy feat; the requirements to become credentialed are very rigorous and involve many clinical hours and an exhaustive exam.  Continuing education hours and/or retaking the exam are required every 5 years to maintain the credentials.  There are over 27,450 IBCLCs worldwide.

Some IBCLCs are also Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educators.  Both organizations represent the gold standard in their field and it is not surprising that some professionals seek out both qualifications.  When an LCCE is also an IBCLC, their class families can really benefit.  The LCCE is able to weave in a rich knowledge of breastfeeding topics and information throughout the class, as well as share information about common challenges that they see when working as an IBCLC.

creative commons licensed (BY-NC) flickr photo by robysaltori: http://flickr.com/photos/robysaltori/4604876371

CC flickr photo by robysaltori: http://flickr.com/photos/robysaltori/4604876371

A lactation consultant can use their childbirth education skills to hone their communication and help families understand the nuances of feeding their babies when they are delivering breastfeeding information during a consultation.  The two professions can complement each other beautifully.

Of course, the scope of practice of LCCEs and IBCLCs is different, and it is important to recognize the separation and to wear the proper hat when conducting yourself professionally in either capacity.

For official information on how to become an IBCLC, check out the information on the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners (IBLCE ) site. If you are considering becoming an IBCLC, there is an Facebook Group just for you, where you can discuss the different pathways, find out more about the requirements and costs, and receive the support of other men and women exploring the IBCLC process and preparing for the exam.

I reached out to some Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educators, who are also IBCLCs, to ask some questions and learn more about experience of wearing both hats.  Teri Shilling, Ann Grauer and Ashley Benz generously shared their thoughts below.

Sharon Muza:  Which credential did you receive first, your IBCLC or your LCCE?

Teri Shilling: I received my LCCE first.

Ann Grauer: I was an LCCE first. I never thought I’d be an IBCLC but one year the policies fit me and I decided to go for it.

Ashley Benz: I became an LCCE first and then an IBCLC. My goal had always been to become a lactation consultant. I knew that it was a long road and I was so interested in getting started working with families that I did a couple of certifications before I was ready to take my IBCLC exam.

SM: How does having both credentials benefit your students and clients?

Teri: So much of my work as an IBCLC is education – by the bedside, on the phone, etc.  Keeping things simple and memorable is key.  The certifications speaks to my professionalism and commitment to continuing education

Ann: I had a CLC before my IBCLC—I’ve always felt that I wanted and needed more information on breastfeeding. I’ve taught breastfeeding classes since the beginning but the information explosion in that one topic is incredible!  I feel very strongly that it serves my childbirth classes well that I have that credential and that being an LCCE serves my breastfeeding clients. I see things from a “facilitator of education” standpoint, rather than a traditional IBCLC standpoint.

Ashley: Because a lot of what a lactation consultant does is teach, I use the skills I’ve gained from teaching Lamaze class in breastfeeding consultations. In Lamaze class, I use my knowledge about breastfeeding and mother-infant bonding.

SM: Does your IBCLC knowledge influence how and what you teach about breastfeeding? 

Teri: Yes, I think it does, but I have been an IBCLC for 20+ years and can’t remember what I taught before.  But being an IBCLC gives me first had experience with the big bumps in the road many women hit during the postpartum time.

Ann: Yes. I’ve actually simplified what I teach. Being an IBCLC, means I now appreciate that parents need simple and honest information that they can incorporate into their parenting.

Ashley: I probably emphasize the need to seek proper help more than other educators. My class focuses on the basics of breastfeeding and assumes I’ve convinced my students to get support for issues that arise.

SM: What would you recommend for other LCCEs who might want to be an IBCLC? What are the challenges?

Teri: Do a community search for where the gaps are in support – is there a breastfeeding coalition in your area? It is important to network.  Find a mentor.  I would say go for it.  More education never hurts.  The challenge is being employed as an IBCLC as a non-nurse.  It helps if you are the entrepreneur type and able to set up a private practice.

Ann: If you’re a non-RN you will have to work incredibly hard. The system is set up to be medically-minded and there is not appreciation/understanding of what non-RNs bring to the table. Which, by the way, is a lot. Rather than focusing on becoming an IBCLC, allow yourself to enjoy the journey of learning and you’ll be there before you know it.

Ashley: The major challenge of the IBCLC path is that it can be very time (and often financially) intensive. I recommend checking out the IBLCE website and see if there is a pathway that you already fit into. If not, make a five-year plan to become an IBCLC.

SM: Where do you think it gets tricky wearing both hats?

Teri: I don’t think it does.  I love being able to be part of the continuum from pregnancy to postpartum.

Ann: I don’t think it does. My confidence is in the mother and baby. I’m just here to help in any role I can.

Ashley: Whenever you have multiple sets of skills, it can be difficult to maintain appropriate business boundaries and communicate those to your students and clients.

Careers as both a Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator and an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant are fun, challenging and very rewarding.  They are a wonderful compliment to each other and families can benefit from the knowledge that someone who holds both credentials can share when serving in either role.  Are you an LCCE who has considered or would like to become an IBCLC?  Are you already on that path?  Share a bit about your journey in our comments section and let us know.

Babies, Breastfeeding, Childbirth Education, Newborns , , , , , , , , ,

Jazz It Up! Using Haiku Deck to Create Snappy Image-Based Presentations

March 3rd, 2015 by avatar

By Jocelyn Alt, CD(ToLabor), MBA

 My favorite way to teach is using interactive, engaging activities that get my families building community with each other, interacting with class members, actively partipating rather than passive listening and often up and out of their seats.  Sometimes, it does become necessary to use a presentation format to present a topic.  Alternately, using such a format can help reinforce one of the activities you are doing in class.  Today on Science & Sensibility, CBE and doula Jocelyn Alt shares a tool, Haiku Deck, that she uses to create interesting presentations to use in her childbirth classes.  Jocelyn reviews it here and shares some of her recent presentations. – Sharon Muza, Science & Sensibility Community Manager.

Some of my most rewarding moments as a childbirth educator are times when former participants share stories about using skills or information during their births that they learned in class. It might be a squatting position we practiced, the benefits and risks of narcotics as pain relief that we teach using an interactive game, or the BRAIN acronym for making informed decisions (see below if you are unfamiliar with this rubric.) My team of educators and I are always looking for new ways to make our classes more engaging and memorable so that our students will have a higher likelihood of recalling the information when they need it most – during labor.

Haiku Deck – reinforcing learning

It’s been known for eons that using images reinforces learning (it’s been said so often, the adage is hackneyed: “A picture is worth a thousand words.” But it’s often true!) So I was excited when I recently found out about a tool that allows you to create beautiful image-based slide presentations in a snap. It’s called Haiku Deck. Presentations created with this program can be used in conjunction with interactive activities as an introduction or backdrop, or alongside lecture components of class.

© Jocelyn Alt

© Jocelyn Alt

Here is an example of a presentation created with Haiku Deck: Top Five Tips for New Moms. If you click on the deck and view it on the Haiku Deck site, you can also see the notes that accompany each slide. After looking at the presentation, try testing its effectiveness on yourself. How many images do you remember from it? How many of the messages do you remember? How many do you think you would have remembered if you had simply seen them presented as text in a bulleted list?

Here’s another Haiku Deck for the acronym BRAIN: Five Essential Questions for Decision-Making in Labor, which I use to teach informed decision making. Each letter of the Screenshot 2015-03-02 16.22.22acronym stands for a question laboring parents can ask themselves and their care providers when faced with a decision in labor – or at any other time for that matter. One dad said that he found it so useful, he started using it as a decision-making tool at work! The acronym stands for Benefits, Risks, Alternatives, Intuition, and Need Time. Acronyms themselves can help with recall, and reinforcing them with images can make them even more sticky.

What I like about Haiku Deck

Ease of Use – The interface is elegant and simple to use.  One great feature is the huge library of images.  You just type in a word that relates to your content, and dozens of photos come up for your use.  With one click, you can add them to your presentation.

Effectiveness – The structure of Haiku Deck forces you to be concise with your words and use images to communicate much of your message. The result is presentations that connect to people.  Many of the most popular slide decks on the large presentation posting site SlideShare were made with Haiku Deck because they draw people in and are memorable.

Accessibility – You can use Haiku Deck to make presentations in a browser on your computer or through the iPad app. Presentations are all backed up on the Haiku Deck site and can be embedded into websites and social media, so you can easily make them available to your participants to reference outside of class.

Just for fun, here’s one last Haiku Deck on the Six Signs of Labor Progression.

Screenshot 2015-03-02 16.32.49

If you try Haiku Deck in your classes, I’d love to see any presentations you develop. Drop the links in the comments section below and let us know if you found the program easy or difficult to use and a bit about your experience.

Resources

Defetyer, M. A., Russo, R., McPartlin, P. L. (2009). The picture superiority effect in recognition memory: a developmental study using the response signal procedure.Cognitive Development, 24, 265-273. doi: 10.1016/j.cogdev.2009.05.002

Foos, P.W., & Goolkasian, P. (2005). Presentation formats in working memory: The role of attention. Memory & Cognition, 33(3), 499-513.

Shepard, R.N. (1967). Recognition memory for words, sentences, and pictures. Journal of Learning and Verbal Behavior, 6, 156-163.

About Jocelyn Alt

© Jocelyn Alt

© Jocelyn Alt

Jocelyn Alt, CD, MBA, is a childbirth educator and birth doula who has been working with expecting and new parents since 2006. Jocelyn is the Founder and Director of Ohana, a birth and parenting services company with locations in Chicago and Seattle that offers childbirth classes, prenatal yoga, doulas, new parent groups, and maternity concierge services. The word ohana means “family” in Hawaiian and refers to one’s inner circle of both family and close friends. In addition to helping parents-to-be transition to parenthood, Jocelyn enjoys hiking, cycling, and hosting dinner parties. She lives in Seattle, WA.  Reach Jocelyn through her website  www.OhanaParents.com.

 

 

 

Childbirth Education, Guest Posts , ,

Henci Goer – Fact Checking the New York Times Home Birth Debate

February 26th, 2015 by avatar
home birth

© HoboMama

An article in The New York Times Opinion Pages – Room for Debate was released on February 24th, 2015.  As customary in this style of article, the NYT asks a variety of experts to provide essays on the topic at hand, in this case, the safety of home birth. Henci Goer, author and international speaker on maternity care, and an occasional contributor to our blog, takes a look at the facts on home birth and evaluates how they line up with some of the essay statements. Read Henci’s analysis below.  – Sharon Muza, Science & Sensibility Community Manager

As one would predict, three of the four obstetricians participating in the NY Times debate “Is Home Birth Ever a Safe Choice?“assert that home birth is unacceptably risky. Equally predictably, the evidentiary support for their position is less than compelling.

John Jennings, MD president of the American Congress of Obstetricians & Gynecologists, in his response- “Emergency Care Can Be Too Urgently Needed,” cites a 2010 meta-analysis by Wax and colleagues that has been thoroughly debunked. Here is but one of the many commentaries, Meta-Analysis: The Wrong Tool Wielded Improperly, pointing out its weaknesses. In a nutshell, the meta-analysis includes studies in its newborn mortality calculation that were not confined to low-risk women having planned home births with a qualified home birth attendant while omitting a well-conducted Dutch home birth study that dwarfed the others in size and reported equivalent newborn death rates in low-risk women beginning labor at home and similar women laboring in the hospital (de Jonge 2009).

The other naysayers, Grunebaum and Chervenak, in their response – “Home Birth Is Not Safe“, source their support to an earlier NY Times blog post that, in turn, cites a study conducted by the two commentators (and others) (Grunebaum 2014). Their study uses U.S. birth certificate data from 2006 to 2009 to compare newborn mortality (day 1 to day 28) rates at home births attended by a midwife, regardless of qualifications, with births attended by a hospital-based midwife, who almost certainly would be a certified nurse midwife (CNM) in babies free of congenital anomalies, weighing 2500 g or more, and who had reached 37 weeks gestation. The newborn mortality rate with home birth midwives was 126 per 10,000 versus 32 per 10,000 among the hospital midwives, nearly a 4-fold difference. However, as an American College of Nurse-Midwives commentary on the abstract for the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine presentation that preceded the study’s publication observed, vital statistics data aren’t reliably accurate, don’t permit confident determination of intended place of birth, and don’t follow transfers of care during labor.

As it happens, we have a study that is accurate and allows us to do both those things. The Midwives Alliance of North America study reports on almost 17,000 planned home births taking place between 2004 and 2009 (Cheyney 2014b), and therefore overlapping Grunebaum and Chervenak’s analysis, in which all but 1000 births (6%) were attended by certified or licensed home birth midwives. According to the MANA stats, the newborn death rate in women who had never had a cesarean and who were carrying one, head-down baby, free of lethal congenital anomalies was 53 per 10,000, NOT 126 per 10,000. This is less than half the rate in the Grunebaum and Chervenak analysis. (As a side note, let me forestall a critique of the MANA study, which is that midwives simply don’t submit births with bad outcomes to the MANA database. In point of fact, midwives register women in the database in pregnancy [Cheyney 2014a], before, obviously, labor outcome could be known. Once enrolled, data are logged throughout pregnancy, labor and birth, and the postpartum, so once in the system, women can’t fall off the radar screen.)

We’re not done. Grunebaum and Chervenak’s analysis suffers from another glaring flaw as well. Using hospital based midwives as the comparison group would seem to make sense at first glance, but unlike the MANA stats, which recorded outcomes regardless of where women ultimately gave birth or who attended them, hospital-based midwives would transfer care to an obstetrician when complications arose. This would remove labors at higher risk of newborn death from their statistics because the obstetrician would be listed on the birth certificate as the attendant, not the midwife. For this reason, the hospital midwife rate of 32 per 10,000 is almost certainly artificially low. So Grunebaum and Chervenak’s difference of 94 per 10,000 has become 21 per 10,000 at most and probably much less than that, a difference that I’d be willing to bet isn’t statistically significant, meaning unlikely to be due to chance. On the other hand, studies consistently find that, even attended by midwives, several more low-risk women per 100 will end up with cesarean surgery—more if they’re first-time mothers—then compared with women planning home births (Romano, 2012).

Hopefully, I’ve helped to provide a defense for those who may find themselves under attack as a result of the NY Times article. I’m not sanguine, though. As can be seen by Jennings, Grunebaum, and Chervenak, people against home birth often fall into the category of “My mind is made up; don’t confuse me with the facts.”

photo source: creative commons licensed (BY-NC-SA) flickr photo by HoboMama: http://flickr.com/photos/44068064@N04/8586579077

References

Cheyney, M., Bovbjerg, M., Everson, C., Gordon, W., Hannibal, D., & Vedam, S. (2014). Development and validation of a national data registry for midwife-led births: the Midwives Alliance of North America Statistics Project 2.0 dataset. J Midwifery Womens Health, 59(1), 8-16. doi: 10.1111/jmwh.12165 http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24479670

Cheyney, M., Bovbjerg, M., Everson, C., Gordon, W., Hannibal, D., & Vedam, S. (2014b). Outcomes of care for 16,924 planned home births in the United States: the midwives alliance of north america statistics project, 2004 to 2009. J Midwifery Womens Health, 59(1), 17-27. doi: 10.1111/jmwh.12172 http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24479690

de Jonge, A., van der Goes, B. Y., Ravelli, A. C., Amelink-Verburg, M. P., Mol, B. W., Nijhuis, J. G., . . . Buitendijk, S. E. (2009). Perinatal mortality and morbidity in a nationwide cohort of 529,688 low-risk planned home and hospital births. BJOG 116(9), 1177-1184. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=1177%5Bpage%5D+AND+2009%5Bpdat%5D+AND+de+jonge%5Bauthor%5D&cmd=detailssearch

Grunebaum, A., McCullough, L. B., Sapra, K. J., Brent, R. L., Levene, M. I., Arabin, B., & Chervenak, F. A. (2014). Early and total neonatal mortality in relation to birth setting in the United States, 2006-2009. Am J Obstet Gynecol, 211(4), 390 e391-397. doi: 10.1016/j.ajog.2014.03.047 http://www.ajog.org/article/S0002-9378(14)00275-0/abstract

Romano, A. (2012). The place of birth: home births. In Goer H. & Romano A. (Eds.), Optimal Care in Childbirth: The Case for a Physiologic Approach. Seattle, WA: Classic Day Publishing.

Wax, J. R., Lucas, F. L., Lamont, M., Pinette, M. G., Cartin, A., & Blackstone, J. (2010). Maternal and newborn outcomes in planned home birth vs planned hospital births: a metaanalysis. Am J Obstet Gynecol, 203(3), 243.e241-e248. http://www.ajog.org/article/S0002-9378%2810%2900671-X/abstract

About Henci Goer

Henci Goer

Henci Goer

Henci Goer, award-winning medical writer and internationally known speaker, is the author of The Thinking Woman’s Guide to a Better Birth and Optimal Care in Childbirth: The Case for a Physiologic Approach She is the winner of the American College of Nurse-Midwives “Best Book of the Year” award. An independent scholar, she is an acknowledged expert on evidence-based maternity care.  

 

 

Babies, Evidence Based Medicine, Guest Posts, Home Birth, Maternal Quality Improvement, Maternity Care, Midwifery , , , , ,

Online Course- “Labor Pain Management: Techniques for Comfort & Coping” Goes Live

February 24th, 2015 by avatar

online course adLamaze International is very pleased to announce the release of their fourth and newest online Lamaze childbirth education course for expectant families.  This newest offering, “Labor Pain Management: Techniques for Comfort and Coping” provides families with coping skills for all the stages and phases of labor, from early labor right through pushing and birth.  All of the Lamaze International online courses are interactive, filled with great photographs and graphics, and based on the most current evidence.  You can read more about the previous courses that were released in this post from November, 2014.  Our first online course: Safe and Healthy Birth: Six Simple Steps was released in early 2014 when Lamaze unveiled the Online Parent Learning Center.

Lamaze International expanding into online childbirth education

The Lamaze International Strategic Framework 2014-2017 that resulted from in-depth strategic planning meetings held in 2014 with the Board of Directors and Lamaze management resulted in many forward thinking, comprehensive and courageous goals, including plans to “innovate education and expand to the childbearing years” by:

  • reaching more women earlier and more frequently throughout childbearing years,
  • expanding delivery methods for online education (e.g., virtual classes, Facetime consults, and mobile apps), and
  • developing a strategy to broaden outreach at the electronic level and cultivate moms ‘up’ the ladder for more personalized services and training.

Labor Pain Management: Techniques for Comfort and Coping

The course description lets families know that “labor and birth require a lot of physical and mental preparation. As you get ready for your upcoming birth, you will want to have a variety of comfort measures and coping techniques in your labor toolbox so that you and your support team can be as prepared as possible. Learning helpful labor positions and strategies to promote labor progress will allow your body to work with your baby toward a safe and healthy birth. Lamaze International has created this class to provide you with the information and skills you will need to minimize discomfort and labor confidently.”

The voice over sections with the birth story were particularly helpful in making me feel like others have gone through this – so I can too.” – online course participant.

The class objectives

After completing this class learners will be able to:

  • Use learned relaxation skills suitable for early labor
  • Practice a variety of comfort techniques that minimize active labor discomfort
  • Understand back labor and how to cope with back pain while encouraging baby to turn
  • Plan for transition with effective labor strategies
  • Learn the top positions for pushing that open the pelvis and shorten the pushing time

Practice makes perfect

Interactive activities invite parents to practice coping activities, breathing skills and different positions alone and with a partner to see what might work for them in labor.  They can also follow along with a birth story from start to finish, woven throughout the course, to see how a new family applied the skills covered in the course at their own birth.  Families are encouraged to stop and practice newly learned techniques and note what they think will work well for them in labor.  The sections of the course detail what is happening physiologically during each phase and offers suggestions for emotional and physical  coping and comfort techniques that might be helpful.  Families are introduced to positions and activities to practice as they near the end of their pregnancies, so they are familiar with them prior to labor beginning.  The course builds confidence in the pregnant person that they will have many helpful techniques to try, and demonstrates the important role of the birth partner and other support people who will be in attendance.  There is also information about how to continue to promote labor progress should a woman choose to have an epidural.

I loved how easy the online format was, and I completed the entire class with my husband, who learned a lot about his role in birth supporting me. – online course participant.

This self-paced class is accessible on both desktop and mobile devices, and discussion forums built into the course encourage community building and online engagement with other families.

Class participants are able to repeat the course material as often as they wish and fun quizzes spaced throughout reinforce their learning.  At the end of the course, families are provided with the benefits of taking an in-person online class, and directed to the “Find a Lamaze Class” section of the parent website to locate a class in their area.

Online courses still to come in 2015 include Parenting Together: Starting Off Strong and Prepared for Pregnancy: Start Off Right, which are still in development.  Existing classes that are available now are:

  • Labor Pain Management: Techniques for Comfort and Coping
  • VBAC: Informed and Ready
  • Breastfeeding Basics: From Birth to Back to Work
  • Safe and Healthy Birth: Six Simple Steps

To learn more about this newest addition to the Lamaze International online course catalogue, preview the courses and persuse all the offerings, please visit the online course catalog.

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