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Working to Improve Perinatal Depression Rates – An Interview with Researcher Nancy Byatt, DO

September 1st, 2015 by avatar

By Walker Karraa, PhD.

sad mother and baby dropboxPerinatal and/or postpartum depression affects more than 15% off all women during pregnancy or after birth.  Many women are not diagnosed and therefore are not referred on to specialists who can help them with appropriate treatment. Last month, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) announced an inaugural grant of 2.5 million dollars to University of Massachusetts Medical School researchers for the purpose of exploring the feasibility and effectiveness of obstetricians diagnosing and treating women suffering from perinatal or postpartum depression within their current obstetrical practice.  The ability of obstetricians to identify and treat affected women may help to close the gap that exists in women receiving treatment, and ensure adequate care is available and provide the ability to monitor how the women respond to treatment.  Creating a network of resources and providing OB access to psychiatric specialists for consultations can result in more women receiving more effective treatment faster from the provider they are already seeing.  Dr. Walker Karraa, perinatal mental health expert interviewed on of the co-investigators, Dr. Nancy Byatt about this research grant and what it might mean for women suffering from perinatal depression. – Sharon Muza, Community Manager, Science & Sensibility.

Walker Karraa, PhD: How is this grant first of its kind?

Nancy Byatt, DO: This is the first time the Centers for Disease Control put forth a request for applications for the Evaluation of a Stepped Care Approach for Perinatal Depression Treatment in Obstetrics and Gynecology Clinics.

WK: How long have you and your colleagues been working on this grant?

NB: Our team began working on understanding how depression could be addressed in obstetric settings in 2010. Driven by our commitment to helping women get treatment by leveraging the obstetrical care setting, we were awarded two institutionally funded grants to conduct three formative research studies with obstetric providers and staff, postpartum patients and pregnant women.

Jeroan Allison, MD, Nancy Byatt, DO, and Tiffany Moore Simas, MD.

Investigators Jeroan Allison, MD, Nancy Byatt, DO, and Tiffany Moore Simas, MD.

Our preliminary studies evaluated the perspectives of obstetric providers and postpartum women, about ways to improve depression treatment in the obstetric setting. We found that barriers occurring at the patient, provider, and systems-level prevent perinatal women and obstetric providers from addressing depression. Our preliminary data led us to hypothesize that transforming obstetrical practice to include depression treatment would enhance women’s access to and engagement in treatment and thereby improve depression outcomes.

WK: Tell us about the pilot study and how it revealed the gaps in treatment. What are the gaps identified? Why do you feel these gaps exist?

In our formative studies, and literature reviews, we identified a number of patient, provider, and systems-level barriers and facilitators to the treatment of perinatal depression and reviewed clinical, programmatic, and systems-level interventions. Provider and systems-level barriers include: (1) lack of obstetric provider training in technical aspects of depression care and communication skills; (2) absence of standardized processes and procedures for stepped depression care; (3) lack of mental health providers willing to treat pregnant women; (4) lack of referral networks; and, (5) inadequate capacity for follow-up and care coordination. These are exacerbated by patient-level barriers. Perinatal women report they fear stigma, losing parental rights, and being judged as an unfit mother. Many women perceive obstetric providers and staff as unsupportive, unavailable, and inadequately trained in depression.  We have built the RAPPID program to address these critical barriers at the provider, patient, and system level.

WK: If readers wanted to learn more about your work and/or the gaps in treatment, what literature would you recommend?

NB: We have several peer-reviewed articles that summarize our work. (see the reference section below.)

WK: What was your original vision for MCPAP?

NB: We aimed to translate the successful Massachusetts Child Psychiatry Access Project (MCPAP) to address perinatal depression. MCPAP has transformed the delivery of child mental health services in Massachusetts by making immediate psychiatric consultation available to pediatricians, to address depression in obstetric settings.   Our vision was that expanding MCPAP to create MCPAP for Moms, a new program that could provide obstetric, psychiatric, primary care and pediatric providers with access to care coordination and psychiatric telephone consultation to help them address perinatal depression. We aimed to create a population-based program that would help the entire state of Massachusetts address depression by building capacity of the frontline providers who are serving pregnant and postpartum women in their medical setting.

WK: Can you explain how the RAPPID program will be compared to the MCPAP program?

NB: To build on and address the limitations of MCPAP for Moms, we developed and pilot tested the Rapid Access to Perinatal Psychiatric Care in Depression (RAPPID) Program to create a more comprehensive intervention that is proactive, multifaceted, and practical. RAPPID aims to improve perinatal depression treatment and treatment response rates through: (1) access to the immediate resource provision/referrals and psychiatric telephone consultation for Ob/Gyn providers via MCPAP for Moms; (2) clinic-specific implementation of stepped care, including training support and toolkits; and, (3) proactive treatment engagement, patient monitoring, and stepped treatment response to depression screening/assessment. RAPPID was developed using formative data and feedback from key stakeholders.

We will compare two active interventions, enhanced usual care (access to MCPAP for Moms) vs. RAPPID in a cluster randomized controlled trial (RCT) in which we will randomize 12 Ob/Gyn clinics with diverse patient populations to either RAPPID or enhanced usual care.

WK: How is stepped care different than collaborative care?

NB: Stepped care models involve initial determination of treatment based on illness severity and intensification of care (such as stepwise increases in dose of antidepressant medication) for those with persistent illness.

WK: What has inspired your work in this field?

NB: I have been moved by women’s stories and how hard it was for them to access the care that they needed and deserved. In the beginning of my career I was seeing this time and time again.

I am inspired by the women I serve. I have worked with countless pregnant and postpartum women. Perinatal women initially or in a prior pregnancy were not able to access the care they needed and deserved. This led me to want to make an impact beyond patient care and I envisioned a program would help pregnant and postpartum women access treatment for their depression.

WK: What are the most critical issues in perinatal mental health today?

NB: Despite having evidence based treatments available, depression is not detected among many pregnant and postpartum women and even if it is detected, many women will not be able to access treatment. Depression during pregnancy is twice as common as diabetes and it needs to be a routine part of obstetric care just as diabetes is a routine part of obstetric care.

References

  1. Byatt N, Levin L, Ziedonis D, Moore Simas T, Allison J. To What Extent Does Screening and Referral Improve Depression Outcomes and Mental Health Care Utilization Among Perinatal Women? Obstetrics and Gynecology. In Press.
  1. Byatt N, Rui X, Dinh K, Waring EM. Trends in Mental Health Care Use in Relation to Depressive Symptoms Among Pregnant Women. Archives of Women’s Mental Health. 2015 Apr 7. Epub ahead of print.
  1. Weinreb L, Byatt N, Moore Simas TA, Tenner K and Savageau JA. What happens to mental health treatment during pregnancy? Women’s experience with prescribing providers. Psychiatr Q. 2014;85:349-355.
  1. Byatt N, Biebel K, Friedman L, Debordes-Jackson G, Pbert L, Ziedonis D. Patient’s Views on Depression Care in Obstetric Settings: How Do They Compare to the Views of Perinatal Health Care Professionals? General Hospital Psychiatry. 2013;35(6):598.
  1. Byatt N, Biebel K, Debordes-Jackson G, Lundquist R, Moore Simas T, Weinreb L, Ziedonis D. Community Mental Health Provider Reluctance to Provide Pharmacotherapy May Be a Barrier to Addressing Perinatal Depression: A Preliminary Study. Psychiatric Quarterly. 2013;84(2):169-174.
  1. Byatt N, Moore Simas T, Lundquist R, Johnson J, Ziedonis D. Strategies for Improving Perinatal Depression Treatment in North American Outpatient Obstetric Settings. Journal of Psychosomatic Obstetrics & Gynecology. 2012;33(4):143-61.
  2. Byatt N, Biebel K, Lundquist R, Moore Simas T, Debordes-Jackson G, Ziedonis D. Patient, Provider and System-level Barriers and Facilitators to Addressing Perinatal Depression. Journal of Reproductive and Infant Psychology. 2012;30(5):436-439.
  3. Byatt N, Moore Simas T, Lundquist R, Johnson J, Ziedonis D. Strategies for Improving Perinatal Depression Treatment in North American Outpatient Obstetric Settings. Journal of Psychosomatic Obstetrics & Gynecology. 2012;33(4):143-61.

About Nancy Byatt, D.O., M.S., M.B.A., F.A.P.M.

© Nancy Byatt

© Nancy Byatt

Nancy Byatt, D.O., M.S., M.B.A., F.A.P.M is a psychiatrist focused on improving health care systems to promote maternal mental health. Dr. Byatt is an Assistant Professor at UMass Medical School in the Departments of Psychiatry and Obstetrics and Gynecology. Byatt is a psychosomatic medicine psychiatrist with subspecialty expertise in perinatal mental health. She provides expert psychiatric consultation to obstetric, psychiatric, primary care and pediatric providers serving pregnant and postpartum women. She is the Founding and Statewide Medical Director of the Massachusetts Child Psychiatry Access Project for Moms (MCPAP for Moms). MCPAP for Moms addresses perinatal depression across Massachusetts by providing mental health consultation and care coordination for medical providers serving pregnant and postpartum women.

Byatt’s research focuses on developing innovative ways to improve the implementation and adoption of evidence-based depression treatment for pregnant and postpartum women. She has a Career Development Award that funds her research to help women access and engage in perinatal depression treatment in obstetric settings. She has also received federal funding from the Center for Disease Control to test an intensive, low-cost program that aims to ensure that pregnant and postpartum women with depression receive optimal treatment. Her academic achievements have led to numerous peer-reviewed publications and national awards.

 

Babies, Depression, Guest Posts, Infant Attachment, Maternity Care, New Research, Newborns, Perinatal Mood Disorders, Postpartum Depression, Research , , , , , , ,

Black Breastfeeding Week – “Lift Every Baby” Supports Breastfeeding Black Families

August 27th, 2015 by avatar

BBW-Logo-AugustDates-300x162August 1-7th was World Breastfeeding Week, and the entire month of August was National Breastfeeding Awareness Month.  Science & Sensibility shared information and resources in two posts; Breastfeeding and Work – Let’s Make It Work! Join Science & Sensibility in Celebrating World Breastfeeding Week and Happy World Breastfeeding Week! The Celebration Continues with More Free Resources, along with a “Brilliant Activities for Birth Educators: Nine Ideas for Using Knit Breasts in Breastfeeding Classes” post for those who teach expectant families.

This week we want to recognize and honor Black Breastfeeding Week (August 25-31, 2015) and share information about the “Lift Every Baby” awareness campaign that is the theme of this year’s program.  Black Breastfeeding Week is designed to raise awareness and provide support in black communities.  Both the initiation rate and the duration rate of breastfeeding in black families has been lower than the rates in white families for more than four decades. Low birth weight, preterm deliveries and maternal complications such as preeclampsia are all higher in black women and the black infant mortality rate is more than twice that of white babies.  Breastfeeding and the important benefits it provides can help all babies, but for the most vulnerable and the sickest, breastmilk is a critical component that can mean the difference between life and death.

black breastfeeding mother babyBlack Breastfeeding Week was established three years ago by three women, Kimberly Seals Allers, Kiddada Green and Anaya Sangodele-Ayoka, all leaders in the field of maternal child health, with a focus on families of color.  In the past three years, attention, discussion and events focused on supporting Black Breastfeeding Week have only grown as people of all colors recognize the health disparities that exist right here in the United States, between white families and black families that have lifelong impacts, simply due to the color of one’s skin.

Kimberly Seals Allers wrote an excellent commentary on why there is a need for Black Breastfeeding Week.

There are many activities around the country to support Black Breastfeeding Week.  A full event list can be found here.  On August 29 at 3 PM EST the first nationally coordinated “Lift Up” will be held in various cities across the United States.  Black families will join together at different meeting points across the country to “Lift Up” their babies, regardless of their size or age, to recognize the importance of community support for children.

There will also be the first ever Twitter chat (#LifeEveryBaby) in honor of Black Breastfeeding Week, scheduled for tonight, August 27th at 9 PM EST that you are invited to participate in.

Cara Terreri, from Lamaze International’s blog for parents, Giving Birth With Confidence, has compiled a list of  black breastfeeding resources that you should be aware of:

Black Breastfeeding Week website & Facebook page

It’s Only Natural,” – CDC & Office of Women’s Health breastfeeding guide for African American families

Normalize Breastfeeding

Black Women Do Breastfeed website & Facebook page

Mocha Manual

Your Guide to Breastfeeding for African American Women

You can also find more information and resources on the Black Breastfeeding Week Resources and Toolkit page.

Additionally, I would like to refer you to two previous posts in our “Welcoming All Families” series, written by Lamaze educator and lactation consultant Tamara Hawkins, discussing welcoming families of color to your classes.  Working with Women of Color and Working with Women of Color – Educator Information can help educators create and provide applicable classes and information to the families of color joining their classes.

Black Breastfeeding Week is an important event that can help create awareness for the importance of culturally relevant and accessible breastfeeding support and information for black families.  Childbirth educators and other birth professionals should be ready to provide resources that can help close the gap to the families they work with.  Are you participating in any Black Breastfeeding Week events?  Let us know in the comments section and please, let us all join together to “Lift Every Baby.”

 

Babies, Breastfeeding, Childbirth Education, Infant Attachment, Newborns, Push for Your Baby , , , , ,

Meet Joan Combellick – Lamaze/ICEA Conference Plenary Speaker

August 13th, 2015 by avatar

The Lamaze International-ICEA 2015 Joint Conference is a little more than a month away and I am excited about all of the learning opportunities and connections that will be happening in Las Vegas.  I remember attending the last Lamaze-ICEA joint conference five years ago and it was very memorable.  Over the next month, I would like to introduce you to the four plenary speakers at the conference. We are lucky to have these experts sharing their wisdom and expertise with us.  Today, we meet Joan Combellick, CM, MSN, MPH.  Joan is a midwife and researcher who is interested in the microbiome and the newborn.  She will be sharing relevant information about this new field of research and how it is related to birth in her plenary session: Watchful Waiting Revisited: Birth Experience and the Neonatal Microbiome.  Meet Joan in this brief interview as she shares some thoughts on her topic.  Join us in Las Vegas to hear the session and learn more about this important new field of research.  To register for the conference and find out more about the Lamaze International – ICEA 2015 Joint Conference visit the conference website.

Sharon Muza: The microbiome and the newborn have been getting lots of attention in the mainstream press in recent months. Parents are coming to class with lots of questions about this topic for their childbirth educator. What do you think are the most common questions expectant families might have on this topic as they prepare to birth?

joan combellick head shotJoan Combellick: I have found it is a topic that is variably known and understood among the women I care for. Many have never heard the term microbiome and think about bacteria primarily as “germs” that we need to rid ourselves of through the use of bactericidal wipes or soap, etc. With these women it is important to start with the concept that bacteria is not always dangerous, rather we actually need and depend on the trillions of bacteria living in all different parts of our bodies. Further, that initial bacterial colonization at birth and in the newborn period is an important developmental process.

 Other women have done extensive reading on the subject. With these women it is important to help ground their knowledge in the current state of the science. For example, the lasting effects of probiotic supplements are not well understood or documented. The relationship between alterations in the newborn microbiome and subsequent disorders, such as asthma and allergies, is an association only, not a causal relationship. The exact characteristics of a “healthy” microbiome for any given person have not yet been clearly defined. These are just a few examples of areas within microbiome research that need further illumination.

SM: How should the childbirth educator respond when parents ask these questions?

JC: I think it is important to reflect this is an emerging science with much more to come. There is a lot of media attention on this topic right now, much of which suggests that the microbiome is the key to all human health. But many answers are still out. Certainly it seems the microbiome may play a role in shaping human health or disease, yet health promotion and disease prevention must also be recognized as a multi-factorial processes.  

SM: What role do childbirth educators play in helping families to understand the role of the microbiome on their newborn?

JC: Childbirth educators are uniquely positioned to engage with women and their families in deep and meaningful ways on microbiome-related issues, as they are with many issues related to pregnancy and birth. This is a new topic for health care providers as well as women receiving care and I suspect it is not very thoroughly discussed during pregnancy, partly due to lack of knowledge on the part of health care providers, but also partly due to lack of time during typical prenatal appointments. Childbirth educators can very effectively open this discussion with women, respond to questions and clarify concerns and practices. They can also support women in a more active pursuit of information and a more robust discussion on this topic with their health care providers.

SM: What changes have you observed in families’ choices and birth preparation plans as their awareness of the importance of their newborn’s microbiome increases?

JC: In my clinical work I have had only one patient who underwent a scheduled cesarean delivery for breech presentation ask for help in exposing her infant to vaginal bacteria. She had already done research on this experimental intervention and carried it out largely on her own. I mostly just helped her navigate the hospital environment while she did so..

I have encountered many women taking pre-, pro-, or syn-biotics, though their goals in taking these supplements is not well defined.

SM: Do you think that hospitals are recognizing and addressing this issue with changes in procedures and protocols that support a healthy microbiome in all the babies born in their facilities?

JC: I believe there is very little discussion about this topic and I have not seen any changes in procedures and protocols at the institutions where I work. I think there is openness on the part of providers to learn more, but I think demand for information from women receiving care may actually lead the way on this.

SM: If families could do one thing prenatally and during labor to help ensure their newborn’s microbiome is the healthiest it could be, what would that one thing be?

JC: Follow a path of normal pregnancy, labor and childbirth to the fullest extent possible. When medications or interventions are suggested, understand why they are medically necessary. Avoid interventions done electively or without medical reason.

SM: How has what you know and have studied about the importance of the newborn’s microbiome changed the way you practice?

skin_to_skinJC: I try to scrutinize all of my own clinical practice more thoroughly in both big and small ways. For example, have I made sure that mother and baby have prolonged skin to skin contact immediately after delivery? Have I educated women to the fullest extent possible about the benefits of breastfeeding and then do I offer the practical support that is needed in the first weeks after delivery when breastfeeding is established? Do I need to prescribe that antibiotic prenatally, or is this a case when watchful waiting is more appropriate? Am I at all times following protocols that prioritize vaginal delivery whenever safe for mother and baby?

SM: It has often been suggested that it takes 17 years to go from “bench to bedside,” when the research can be applied to wide-spread clinical procedures. What do you think can be done by both professionals and consumers to speed this process along as it pertains to the microbiome and the newborn?

JC: As educators and clinicians it is our responsibility to stay up to date on the most current research. But this is often difficult. Professionals and consumers alike can speed this process by opening the discussion, just asking questions and pursuing answers. This can help everyone learn more about the topic and most importantly, insure the most up to date care is given and received. Women should always feel empowered to lead the discussion about this topic with their care providers.

SM: What are you looking forward to most about being a plenary speaker and presenting to the Lamaze/ICEA 2015 conference attendees?

JC: I am both a midwife and a researcher. In my clinical world, I know that it is very difficult to stay up to date on current research. And in my research world, I know that research is all too often not well informed by clinical practice. The two worlds often have a lot of distance between them. This is an exciting conference to me because it is an opportunity to bring research and care together. I hope to clearly present the research I am working on, but I also hope to be better informed about the issues childbirth educators encounter in their work. Childbirth educators often have the best opportunity to know the concerns, knowledge and practices of women and their families. I very much look forward to the sharing of information in all directions.

SM: Is there anything else you would like to share with the readers of Science & Sensibility and attendees at the upcoming conference?

JC: We have observed alterations in newborn bacterial development that are associated with interventions used at or around the time of birth (such as cesarean delivery, antibiotic use, and formula feeding). Further, these alterations have been associated with subsequent health outcomes like obesity, allergy, eczema, asthma, and diabetes. While all of these interventions can be truly life saving when used appropriately, it is also clear that in the US and around the world the use of cesarean delivery, antibiotic treatment and formula feeding is occurring at rates that vastly exceed what is medically necessary. It is important for women to ask for and be told in a way they understand the true medical indication for any and all interventions. It is also important for women to understand that birth is not something that should be scheduled into a busy calendar merely as a matter of convenience. Microbiome research suggests that our normal human birth process, as variable and unpredictable as it may be, is important to promote and protect to the fullest extent possible.

 

 

 

2015 Conference, 2015 Lamaze & ICEA Joint Conference, Babies, Childbirth Education, Lamaze International, New Research, Newborns , , , ,

Happy World Breastfeeding Week – The Celebration Continues with More Free Resources!

August 6th, 2015 by avatar

JHL august 2015

Resources continue to be made available during World Breastfeeding Week that will benefit the childbirth educator, doula, lactation consultant, midwife and other professionals as they educate, support and provide assistance to families who are planning to continue to breastfeed and return to work.  Check out today’s resource list.

Free Journal of Human Lactation articles

In honor of worldwide celebrations of World Breastfeeding Week and the theme “Breastfeeding and Work- Let’s Make It Work, the Journal of Human Lactation has made the following ten research articles available for free during the month of August 2015 to anyone interested in reading them.

The Journal of Human Lactation is a quarterly, peer-reviewed journal publishing original research, insights in practice and policy, commentaries, and case reports relating to research and practice in human lactation and breastfeeding. JHL is relevant to lactation professionals in clinical practice, public health, research, and a broad range of fields related to the trans-disciplinary field of human lactation.

Hat tip to Lactation Matters for the heads up on this generous offer from JHL..

Screenshot 2015-08-05 20.22.25Free iMothering Webinar with Nancy Mohrbacher

Nancy Mohrbacher, IBCLC, FILCA, an expert in the field of breastfeeding, and author of several books on breastfeeding including Breastfeeding Solutions: Quick Tips for the Most Common Nursing Challenges, (which was reviewed previously on Science & Sensibility) has a free online webinar for families and professionals on on iMothering.com titled –  Working and Breastfeeding Made Simple.

© Nancy Mohrbacher

© Nancy Mohrbacher

Free Downloadable Resource for Caregivers of Breastfeeding Infants

Additionally, Nancy has shared a super resource that breastfeeding families can share with the caregivers of their nurslings, to help them understand how they can best help and support the breastfeeding working parent when they are watching the child as the caregiver. Check out this printable For the Caregiver of a Breastfed Baby and let families know they can share this with their child’s caregiver to provide accurate information on how best to feed the breastfed baby while s/he is with their caregiver.

Do you have any resources that you have found helpful during this WBW celebration?  I invite you to share and link to them in the comments section so we can all benefit.  Thanks in advance!

Breastfeeding, Childbirth Education, Newborns, Push for Your Baby , , , , ,

Breastfeeding and Work- Let’s Make It Work! Join Science & Sensibility in Celebrating World Breastfeeding Week

August 4th, 2015 by avatar

wbw2015-logo-purpleAugust 1-7th, 2015 is World Breastfeeding Week and is coordinated by the World Alliance for Breastfeeding Action (WABA).  WABA is a global network of individuals & organizations concerned with the protection, promotion & support of breastfeeding worldwide.  World Breastfeeding Week is traditionally celebrated annually the first week of August and this year’s theme – “Breastfeeding and Work- Let’s Make It Work!

As childbirth educators and birth professionals, we are working with expectant families in the weeks and months leading up to birth, and then often in the early weeks of parenting.  During that time, returning to work is often a distant thought, as families struggle to navigate the labor and birth experience and transition to life with a new baby.  Most of the breastfeeding topics we cover in class and one-on-one with families are of the need to know variety that helps them get breastfeeding off to a good start.  If there is even enough time to touch on returning to work as a breastfeeding parent, it is brief and quick due to time limitations and current concerns.

The reality is that most breastfeeding parents return to work.  This return to formal or informal work may occur earlier than parents would have liked due to financial concerns, lack of paid (or unpaid leave) from employers, professional pressures and expectations, as well as family and society demands.  The struggle to maintain an adequate supply of expressed breastmilk and to continue to breastfeed is real and affects many, many families worldwide.  Issues include an unsupportive workplace, insufficient time  and an inadequate or inappropriate place to express milk that can be bottle fed to their child, and an unwelcome environment to be able to nurse their child, if the child can be brought to the workplace.

Childbirth educators may not have time in our routine breastfeeding class to address many of the issues and concerns that these families face when they return to work.  The typical breastfeeding class is geared for the initial days and weeks with a newborn.  Educators can provide take home resources in the form of handouts and useful links that can help families to navigate returning to work successfully, minimizing impact on the breastfeeding dyad.

wbw2015-obj

Additionally, you might consider preparing a stand-alone class that runs a couple of hours geared specifically for the parent who is returning to work  and hoping to continue to breastfeed.  This might be offered for families to attend while still pregnant or after their baby arrives and they are facing the fact that they are going to be returning to work sooner rather than later.  Do you currently already teach such a class in your community?  How do you market it?  How is it received?  Can you share some of your objectives and favorite resources for the Return to Work class that you teach in our comments section below?

© Helen Regina - Policial WABA 2015

© Helen Regina – Policial WABA 2015

Continuing to breastfeed after returning to work benefits businesses as well as mothers, babies and families by providing a three to one Return on Investment (ROI) through lower health care costs, lower employee absenteeism rates due to babies that are healthier, requiring less sick leave, lower turnover rates, and higher employee productivity and loyalty.

Here is some useful information and resources that I have gathered in one location that you may want to share with your students and families, in order to help them make a smooth transition when they return to work as a breastfeeding family.

Many of these websites also provide information in Spanish and other languages as well.

Lamaze International President Robin Elise Weiss has created a new “From the President’s Desk” video – “Tips for Breastfeeding Success” that you can share with parents. While not specifically about breastfeeding while working, helping families get off on the right foot with a solid breastfeeding relationship can help parents to feel confident that they are meeting their baby’s nutritional needs right from the start and that can continue once they return to work.  You can also direct families to Lamaze International’s online breastfeeding class, where additional information and resources can be found.  Finally, consider encouraging parents to download our new free Pregnancy to Parenting app which contains evidence based and easily accessible information on many topics includingbreastfeeding as well as useful app features like a breastfeeding and diaper log and additional resources.

How are you celebrating World Breastfeeding Week in your community? Share your activities and ideas in the comments section below and thank you so much for all you do to support breastfeeding with the families you work with.

Babies, Breastfeeding, Childbirth Education, Infant Attachment, Lamaze International, Newborns, Push for Your Baby , , , , , , ,

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