Archive for the ‘Lamaze News’ Category

Sharon Muza – Community Manager for Science & Sensibility Receives Lamaze International Media Award

September 24th, 2015 by avatar

By Cara Terreri, CD(DONA), LCCE

cara and sharon lamaze media award

Sharon Muza & Cara Terreri receive Lamaze International 2015 Media Award

One of the highlights of the recent Lamaze International/ICEA 2015 Joint Conference in Las Vegas, was being awarded the Lamaze International Media Award for 2015.  The purpose of the Lamaze International Media Award is for Lamaze International to honor individuals or organizations that present normal, physiologic birth and/or Lamaze International in a positive light in the mass media. It is given to a blogger or journalist who has worked hard to provide both consumers and professionals with accurate information on current best practice.  Both Cara Terreri, the Community Manager of Giving Birth With Confidence, Lamaze International’s consumer blog, and I were 2015 recipients.  Cara and I interviewed each other for both blogs this week so we could share the news.  Today, you find Cara’s interview of me, and tomorrow on GBWC- I interview Cara. Check out both blogs and learn a bit more about the Community Managers behind the two Lamaze International blogs – including some fun facts. – Sharon Muza Community Manager, Science & Sensibility

Cara Terreri: How long have you been the Community Manager for Science & Sensibility?

Sharon Muza: I have been the Community Manager with Science & Sensibility since May, 2012, and have written or edited more than 200 posts for the blog. Yowza!

CT: What else do you do professionally in addition to this position?

SM: A lot! I hold many birth related jobs in Seattle, WA and sometimes it is hard to keep track! I am an independent childbirth educator and I teach some specialized classes that I developed like “VBAC YOUR Way,” “Labor YOUR Way” and “Cesarean YOUR Way” along with a lot of private classes. I am a certified birth doula, and also a birth doula trainer for the Simkin Center, Bastyr University, which offers a DONA Approved workshop. I teach a seven week out of hospital birth series for the fabulous Penny Simkin, as part of her teaching team. I am a consulting instructor for Parent Trust for Washington Children’s childbirth education group – Great Starts, where we have over 30 childbirth educators working. I am a trainer for Passion for Birth, a Lamaze approved program that trains childbirth educators. I rent birth tubs, sell rebozos and TENS units and conduct advanced doula trainings on a variety of topics both locally and on the road. I offer editing and copywriting services, typically for other birth related businesses. I also present at both local and international conferences and sometimes do a bit of writing for other online publications. In between all that, I work on a variety of smaller projects that come and go. I am really a serious multi-tasker when it comes to my employment. A true freelancer. You can learn more about me at SharonMuza.com

CT: How did you feel when you learned that you had received the Lamaze International 2015 Media Award?

SM: Robin Elise Weiss, President of Lamaze International, called to tell me initially, and I was stunned speechless, which doesn’t often happen. I was honored and amazed and feel very, very grateful for the recognition. It makes all the hard work feel very worthwhile. I am still smiling and beaming with pride.

CT: What do you enjoy about writing and managing the blog?

SM: Writing and managing the blog means that I have to work hard at staying current with new research as it comes out, which truly helps me to know what best practices are, and I believe makes me a better educator and doula. I also get to work with fabulous writers and researchers who are guest bloggers and regular contributors, and that collaboration is very enjoyable. I very much enjoy other contributions I get to make to the Lamaze International organization, including developing and contributing to some of the online classes, participating in the Lamaze Institute for Safe & Healthy Birth projects and providing feedback on other ongoing projects.

CT: What are some of the challenges of this position?

SM: I think one of the biggest challenges as Community Manager for Science & Sensibility is that no sooner do I finish one blog post then I am focused on the next one and the next one and so on.  It is challenging to keep up with the editorial calendar. Also, I find it challenging to really dig deep into the research and understand the studies, which can be thick with facts, assumptions and statistics.  And deadlines.  Always deadlines.

CT: Where do you get inspiration for post topics?

SM: I do a lot of reading, I subscribe to over 400 blogs and news feeds (I cried when Google Reader went away a few years ago) and I have a ton of Google alerts set up for a variety of different topics. I also receive ideas and suggestions from researchers and contributors. Readers of the blog often email me with suggestions as well. Sometimes there is a topic that I want to learn more about, so I either research and write a post or contact an expert in that subject matter to ask them to share their expertise.

CT: Do you have a top post or two that you are really proud of or is a particular favorite? Why?

SM: Personally, I really love the “Welcoming All Families” series that I started in 2012 that explores how educators and other birth professionals can make their classrooms, practices, and services a welcome place for a variety of diverse clientele. I look forward to that occasional series continuing in the future. My new favorite is the 2015 series I started, “Brilliant Activities for Birth Educators” where each month I, along with other educators, share interesting and engaging activities that educators can use in their classrooms when working with families. My heart is in teaching and that series really excites me. I have tried several of the ideas written by others and they have been a big hit with the families I work with.

CT: What’s the most visited/read post on the blog?

SM: Last time I checked, it was a blog post written by Mindy Cockeram, LCCE – “The Red/Purple Line: An Alternative Method for Assessing Cervical Dilation Using Visual Cues” first posted in 2012.  I wouldn’t have expected this, but this post has had the most visitors of all the posts ever published on the blog.

CT: What do you hope the readers of the blog take away from your posts?

SM: My hope is that readers of the blog will be able to learn about and understand just a small portion of the research that is constantly being published and has the potential to affect maternal-infant health. I hope that readers will find information that they can synthesize and share with the families they work with in a helpful way. I also hope that readers enjoy the blog, find it useful and continue to read it.

cara sharon robin lamaze media award 2015CT: What are some of your favorite blogs that you enjoy reading yourself?

SM: This is a hard question to answer, as I really read a lot of blogs.  I have several food/cooking blogs that I enjoy, and I also am very interested in zero waste living (reducing garbage, recycling, upcycling and repurposing) so I read several blogs related to that.  Then a whole host of maternal infant health blogs.  Some blogs on being a better educator and teacher. But mostly hundreds of blogs on the childbearing year written by consumers and professionals.

CT: What is the last book you read of a professional nature?

SM: The most recent book I read of a professional nature was “The Science of Mom” in order to edit a recent book review on Science & Sensibility by contributor Ann Estes.  For fun, I am reading one of Mindy Kaling’s books and have a graphic novel about Julia Child on hold at the library for me.  I am a big library user – both “real” books and electronic books I can check out for the Kindle.

CT: What are some exciting plans for the blog in the future?

SM: I would love to add some more contributors to the line up on the blog – are you interested in writing for Science & Sensibility? Let me know! I have a few other ideas up my sleeve; readers will have to stay tuned to see what turns up!

CT: What is something unusual or fun about you that readers don’t know?

SM: I love good coffee – as soon as my feet hit the ground in the morning! People who know me understand it is best to wait to talk to me until I have started my one (and only one) very strong, large cup that I drink each day. I love to laugh, I am a wee bit sarcastic (which is not always appreciated), and am normally change adverse. I love routine! I have a degree in Biology with a concentration in Fisheries, and have been about 1600 feet down to the bottom of the ocean in a two man submersible. It is very dark down there!  When I was growing up I wanted to be a pilot/lawyer/marine mammalogist – all together.

2015 Conference, 2015 Lamaze & ICEA Joint Conference, Awards, Childbirth Education, Giving Birth with Confidence, Guest Posts, Lamaze International, Lamaze News , , , , , ,

Meet Elan McAllister – Lamaze/ICEA Conference Plenary Speaker

September 8th, 2015 by avatar

ElanMcAllister head shot-220x220The countdown to the Lamaze/ICEA 2015 Conference in Las Vegas is in single digits and the excitement is building. I recently had an opportunity to interview plenary conference speaker Elan McAllister, founder of Choices in Childbirth, an education and advocacy group for pregnant people and their families.  Elan will be opening the conference with her plenary session “No Day But Today” and I am very excited to hear her presentation as she shares how we all can make a difference in birth outcomes and experiences for parents and babies.  Still time to register if you have the flexibility to join us in Las Vegas.  A joint Lamaze International/ICEA conference means great networking opportunities, plenty of continuing education and two great organizations coming together to collaborate on the things that matter.

Sharon Muza: You have long been involved in theater and then went on to found Choices in Childbirth. Do you see any commonalities between a theater production and a birth? In the way one prepares for both? In what is needed to be “successful” in both?

EMc: There are so many similarities! Essentially, both are acts of creation. My role (and its been my honor) in both theater and birth has been to hold space for creation to unfold. Bringing something new into the world, whether a new life or a work of art, challenges us in remarkable ways. It takes tremendous courage to let your self be vulnerable to the creative process and I believe that no one should do it alone. As a producer, I have supported artists and encouraged them to believe in themselves and connect with their voice and vision.   As a doula, I have supported women and encouraged them to own their power in birth.

SM:  I have had the deepest respect for Choices in Childbirth and have so appreciated their invaluable consumer booklets that have been a part of my client and student information packets for many years. Can you share some of the feedback you have gotten from both consumers and professionals regarding their value?

EMc: Thank you so much and I’m thrilled to hear that the Guide to a Healthy Birth has been useful to you! Over the years we’ve distributed thousands of Guides all across the country and have had the most remarkable feedback. Women have told us that it opened a door and encouraged them to think more deeply about their birth choices. Many have referred to it as their birth bible. We worked really hard to create something that would be useful to any woman who picked it up – regardless of her birth choices. We wanted to create something that would be respected by the birth community but that could be embraced by the mainstream. I think we succeeded in that goal and it truly warms the heart to know that something you’ve created has made a difference to people.

choices in childbirth logoSM: Choices in Childbirth has been a leader in maternity care reform and has long been committed to consumer education. The CiC organization along with other maternal-infant health advocates have consistently raised their voices to help improve outcomes for mothers and babies in our country. When you look at all of the programs that CiC has had a hand in, can you share what has made you the most proud? What has been the most challenging?

EMc: Thank you for this opportunity to reflect on the work that CiC has done over the last 12 years and to feel profound gratitude to all of the people who have contributed to CiC’s successes. When you’re in the middle of things, you sometimes lose perspective, so I am grateful for this chance to reflect. In this moment, I’m most proud of the work we did last year to petition the city to reopen the labor and delivery services at North Central Bronx Hospital (NCBH).   For over 30 years, NCBH provided high quality, teamed-based midwifery care to an at risk population in the Bronx. Women who were used to an impersonal, clinic-based health care experience received personalized and continuous care at NCBH with midwives that they were able to build relationship and trust with. While cesarean section rates were skyrocketing all across the city and the nation, NCBH maintained a c-section rate of about 17%, largely due to the fact that 85-90% of births there were attended by midwives. When the services were suddenly closed in 2013, CiC joined a coalition of community organizers that worked together for nearly a year to demand not only that L&D services be returned to the community, but that the midwifery program be returned in tact. Together with local community members and organizations, we were able to make such a compelling argument to the city that they not only reopened the services but invested a million dollars in upgrading the facility!

SM: How do you think childbirth educators can help families to understand the family’s critical role and rights in shared decision-making and informed consent?

EMc: This is such a challenge. We are all faced with the frustrating reality that a huge percent of birthing families are scared about birth and feel most comfortable turning the experience and power over to the “experts.” Negative reinforcement in the form of, say, warning them about the routine overuse of unnecessary medical interventions will typically shut them down further. I have found that the most effective way to encourage families to be more engaged in the decision making process is to inspire them.   Fear of birth is prevalent in our culture and fear shuts us down. The only way to overcome that fear is to awaken families to the deep, essential truth that birth is a sacred, powerful and profoundly important life experience. Be the voice of awe and wonder that inspires them to show up fully and take a higher level of interest and responsibility for this miraculous event in their lives.

Elan McAllister and NCBH Midwives at L&D re-opening

Elan McAllister and NCBH Midwives at L&D re-opening

SM:  If a childbirth educator wanted to spend time (or increase their current level of involvement) in the birth advocacy role – what do you suggest they consider doing on both a local and on a national level? How could they get effectively get involved?

EMc: I love this question and I will be talking a lot about this at the conference. There is both inner and outer work that needs to happen in order for childbirth educators, (and all birth workers) to better engage in birth advocacy work. The inner work consists of two important shifts – 1) Step into the role of Consumer Advocate. Recognize that you are in a critical and powerful position to amplify the voices of the women and families that you are in direct contact with and 2) Become a Bridge Builder. If we’re going to have an impact on the system we must let go of the “us vs. them” victim mentality and start building relationships with decision makers.

The Affordable Care Act offers countless opportunities for us to engage and impact health care reform.   I’ll be talking more at the conference about how to take advantage of this important moment as well as providing examples of work that CiC has been doing over the last couple of years.

SM:  What are the three most important things that families can do to help ensure that their birth experience is both safe and healthy as well as positive?

EMc:  1) Be well informed and in touch with your desires and beliefs so that you can create and communicate a clear vision for your birth.

2) Choose the provider, setting and birth team that will give you the best opportunity to realize the birth that you’ve envisioned.

3) Let go and surrender.   Trust that you have done all that you can, you are stepping into a divine mystery that cannot be controlled and that will unfold exactly as it is meant to.

SM: Can you share a little about how you made the switch from theater producer to tireless advocate for families during their childbearing years? Were you always drawn to birth and birth advocacy and women’s rights? Or was that a “role” you grew into after experiencing specific events in your life?

EMc: I became involved with both theater and birth at around the same time, about 20 years ago. My early career as a professional dancer lead me to theater production right around the time that the young feminist in me picked up a book on midwifery and had her mind blown! I juggled these two passions/ straddled these two worlds for about 15 years before retiring from producing 5 years ago. Though I turned Choices in Childbirth over to new leadership last Fall, I remain devoted to my calling in service of women, babies and families.

SM:  What are you looking forward to most about being a plenary speaker and presenting to the Lamaze/ICEA 2015 conference attendees?

EMc: It’s always a pleasure to speak to a receptive, well informed audience! I look forward to sharing ideas and learning from my peers.

2015 Conference, 2015 Lamaze & ICEA Joint Conference, Babies, Childbirth Education, Lamaze News, Maternal Quality Improvement, Midwifery , , , , ,

Introducing the Lamaze International LCCE Educator Social Media Guide

July 23rd, 2015 by avatar

LI_0350215_LCCE-SocialMediaGuide-FINALThis past Tuesday, I collected and shared a multitude of Lamaze International resources that are available on a variety of social media platforms that many of you might already be familiar with – Pinterest, YouTube, Facebook and many more.  The vast majority of these resources are available to any birth professional or consumer, and a scarce few are limited to Lamaze International members.  There is one more resource for Lamaze International members that I would like to make you aware of – the just released LCCE Educator Social Media Guide.  The Social Media Guide satisfies one of the Lamaze International Strategic Framework Goals for 2014-2017: Continue to build-out social media presence and engagement, and build educator skill and engagement in social media outreach.

Lamaze International has long provided a LCCE Educator Marketing Toolkit to help educators market their Lamaze classes to their community.  The Social Media Guide augments that Toolkit and is a comprehensive document that explains the different social media platforms so that you can select the one(s) that best meet your needs and serve your purpose.  We then help you get started, if you are new to the selected platform. There is also additional information if you are already a user and want to take your professional social media usage to the next level.

The Social Media Guide shares how it might benefit you and your business to engage with potential clients and students on social media, and what impact it might have on your business.  And as everyone knows, using social media can sometimes feel like falling into a big, black hole.  The Social Media Guide helps you to understand the importance of a) setting limits and b) using your limited time wisely.

Have you wondered if you should have a personal AND professional social media account or use the same account for both purposes?  We can help you decide, as the guide discusses the pros and cons of both.  We also provide various social media graphics that you can incorporate into your profiles, helping you to create a brand identity as a premier childbirth educator.

Each platform section is full of “Pro Tips,” useful suggestions and examples that can help you to use the platform effectively, efficiently and wisely.  There is information for all skill levels from beginner to current user.

There is even a comprehensive glossary so that you can make sure to understand all the abbreviations, acronyms, and keywords that are associated with each platform.

Being active and engaged on social media positions you as an expert in your field and can really help consumers to see both the benefits and value in utilizing your services. It also helps share evidence based information that can help guide families to safer and healthier births.  With a smart and effective social media strategy, you will be able to see the return on your time and energy investments with increasingly full classes and further recognition as an expert in serving families during the childbearing year.

If you are a current Lamaze member, head right over, log in and check out and download your copy of this comprehensive guide. If you are not currently a Lamaze International member, this guide along with all the other benefits offered to members is a real value for the price of a membership.

I also want to share that my colleague Jeanette McCulloch and I are teaching an interactive and jam-packed preconference workshop- “Social Media Smarts: Strategic Online Marketing for the Busy Childbirth Professional” on Thursday afternoon, right before the Lamaze International/ICEA 2015 conference starts, on September 17th, in Las Vegas, NV.

Social media marketing may be free, but your time isn’t. With Facebook views on the decline and increasing competition for your audience’s attention, how can you reach new families and fill your childbirth classes or client calendar without spending your day online? Join us for the workshop and advance your skills!  More info on the conference website.  Early bird registration for the conference and this workshop is available through August 1st.  Register now.

Have you had an opportunity to get a peek at the Lamaze International LCCE Educator Social Media Guide.  Share your experiences putting some of the information to work for you in our comments section.



Childbirth Education, Conference Schedule, Continuing Education, Lamaze International, Lamaze News , , , ,

Lamaze International Has The Up-to-Date Resources You Need! Are You Connected?

July 21st, 2015 by avatar

lamaze connectedLamaze International offers a large variety of useful material for Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educators and others to use to increase professional knowledge and help you when working with and sharing information with expectant and new families.  There are YouTube videos, infographics, a smartphone app, professional and consumer blogs, a Pinterest account, weekly newsletters for families, bi-weekly newsletters for Lamaze members, Facebook pages, a Twitter account, Instagram photos, live and recorded webinars and more all available to help you better serve the families that you work with. No matter what type of resource material you choose to access, you can be sure that it is evidence based, current and presented in a professional manner.  Here is a summary of many of these resources in one place so that you can use this post as a reference for easy access to useful information whenever you want.


Science & Sensibility blog for birth professionals – if you are reading this,  of course you have already found this blog.  Published twice a week, you can get all the news, analyses of recently published studies, teaching ideas and more.  You can subscribe to this blog to be sure never to miss a post.

Giving Birth with Confidence – Lamaze International’s consumer blog written by Cara Terreri, CD(DONA), LCCE.  Follow along with families as they move through their pregnancies, get up to date information on pregnancy, birth and postpartum information – all delivered in a consumer friendly, easy to read format.


Lamaze International YouTube channel – a variety of videos, including “From the President’s Desk,” where Lamaze President, Dr. Robin Elise Weiss shares information on a variety of current issues, short and informative videos on many of our infographics, Six Healthy Birth Practices, and many more professional and consumer friendly videos that promotes safe and healthy births.  You can subscribe to this YouTube channel to receive updates when new videos are added.




  • @LamazeOnline – educators and parents can follow along on lots of updates and a great interactive monthly Twitter chat.
  • @LamazeAdvocates – connects birth pros with peers, professional development & resources to support expectant parents on their journey to a natural, safe & healthy birth, as well as participate in a monthly Twitter chat on a variety of topics.

Pregnancy & Parenting Smartphone App

A great tool for families to use through pregnancy, labor/birth and parenting.  Comprehensive, full of great evidence based information and simply very useful.  Check out the Pregnancy & Parenting app page on the Lamaze International website to see all the useful features, and find resources to help you introduce the app to the families you work with.


Evidenced based information in an easy to read (and easy to share), visually appealing infographic format.  Topics include:

  • VBACs (new!)
  • Cesareans
  • Labor Support
  • Healthy Birth Practices
  • Electronic Fetal Monitoring
  • Epidurals
  • Separating Mom and Baby
  • Restricted Food & Drink
  • Restricted Movement
  • Avoiding the First Cesarean
  • Inductions

Find them all here, in both web-based and jpeg formats suitable for printing at your convenience. Don’t forget about the accompanying videos that are based on the infographics.

Email Newsletters

Your Pregnancy Week By Week – a weekly evidence based newsletter designed for parents that provides them with helpful information, tips and resources, delivered right to their inboxes weekly, based on their due date.

Inside Lamaze – a vital resource for continuing education available to Lamaze Members. The latest news, research, and information on upcoming events right in your inbox two times a month. Join Lamaze now to receive this valuable bi-weekly newsletter.


Professional webinars for birth professionals with contact hours that are accepted by many maternal and infant health organizations, including nursing associations. Many of the webinars are free and only incur a small cost for contact hours.

Instagram – a place to find all the Lamaze pregnancy, birth and postpartum news that is fit for a picture!

Lamaze has you covered with great resources that keep you informed, up-to-date and connected on a variety of platforms and in diverse formats.  Stay connected with Lamaze International and have a plethora of useful information always at your fingertips and ready to share with expectant families.  How do you stay connected with Lamaze?  What’s your favorite Lamaze resource? Let us know in the comments section below.

Childbirth Education, Evidence Based Medicine, Lamaze International, Lamaze News, New Research, Research, Webinars , , , , , ,

Series: On the Independent Track to Becoming a Lamaze Trainer – The Curriculum Gets Written (Almost)!

July 7th, 2015 by avatar

By Jessica English, LCCE, FACCE, CD/BDT(DONA)

Late last year, LCCE Jessica English began the path to become an independent trainer with Lamaze International, as part of the just opened “Independent Track”  trainer program.  This new program helps qualified individuals become Lamaze trainers – able to offer Lamaze childbirth educator trainings which is one step on the path for LCCE certification.  She’s agreed to share her trainer journey with us in a series of blog posts; “On the Independent Track to Becoming a Lamaze Trainer”, offering insights at key milestones in the process.  You can read the first part of Jessica’s journey here.  Today, Jessica updates readers on her progress as she tackles the curriculum. If you are interested in becoming a trainer of Lamaze Childbirth Educators, you can find information on applying for the November 2015 Independent Track Program on the website now, and applications are due August 31, 2015.   –  Sharon Muza, Science & Sensibility Community Manager.

JEnglish retreat 1I am so ready to start training childbirth educators!

Unfortunately, my curriculum is not so ready. But I’m getting there — and building lots of empathy for the process my future students will be going through as well.

After finishing my trainer workshop in November, I spent some time processing everything I’d learned. I felt excited about becoming a Lamaze trainer, but I wasn’t ready to jump into writing my curriculum. This is a pretty typical pattern for me, so I was patient with what I know to be a healthy process for myself. I think and process and mull… And then when I’m ready I leap.

As winter turned to spring in the U.S., I watched a few of my classmates finish their curricula and start promoting their trainings. Awesome! Birth workers I had connections with from around the country started asking me when I’d be teaching my first workshop. Wonderful! I started a list of future Lamaze educators so I can update them when I am fully approved to train. I started to feel ready to leap, but the days, weeks and months flew by without much of a dent in my curriculum. I run a busy doula agency and I’m a birth doula trainer and business coach. Not to mention teaching my own childbirth classes and taking care of my own doula clients! And did I mention that I organize a major baby and family expo each February? The phone was always ringing, the email never stopped, meetings dotted each day. I’d jot down ideas or bookmark a resource that I wanted to use with my students. I tried reserving an hour a day to work on the curriculum, but it was challenging to really hold that time sacred. I also found it hard to clear out other distractions. It felt like just as I’d really dig in to a topic, time was up and I needed to move on to another (wildly different) task.

english independent - jpgYears ago in my corporate life, I learned the Eisenhower Decision Matrix for categorizing tasks (popularized by Stephen Covey). I sometimes use this matrix with my business coaching clients. Tasks are divided into categories of urgent, important, both or neither. Using this tool, I could see that I was stuck mostly in the urgent column, but not getting to the Lamaze trainer curriculum because although it was extremely important, it was in no way urgent. It was time to prioritize the important.

I checked in with a couple of folks in my brain trust, sharing my frustration about finding the time to write. (I’ll bet you have a brain trust too! This is my inner circle of trusted advisors that I turn to for support. Some of them are paid, others are mentors or friends with whom I’ve developed a circle of reciprocity — “you help me engineer my life, I’ll help you figure out yours too.”)

My business advisor suggested a retreat.  I talked with another brain trustee, looking for ideas on an affordable retreat. She mentioned Gilchrist, a local retreat center where I could rent a simple cabin and spend a couple of days in the woods. Yes! Perfect! My brain trust had come through for me again.

I reserved three days and two nights in the woods, packed up my food, teaching supplies and laptop. My goal was to leave the retreat center with a fully written curriculum ready to submit to Lamaze International for review. Gilchrist is a 45-minute drive from my home, so I tried to use the drive time to clear out all of the “urgent” from my system. The cabin and the grounds were beautiful. There was no wifi in my cabin and even phone service is spotty, which made it easier to focus in on the curriculum. Each day I walked the trails, cooked, wrote and meditated on everything new childbirth educators would need to make a real difference for families.

I felt connected and focused. It’s always easier for me to tackle big tasks in one large chunk than to piecemeal it, and the retreat was just what I needed. As I think ahead to helping new educators find time to finish their curricula and plan for their classes, I’ll offer the options of reserving small chunks of time over a long period (this works well for some people, even though it’s not a great match for my personal style) or maybe booking their very own Lamaze retreat.JEnglish retreat 2

Unfortunately, I didn’t quite reach my goal to finish the trainer curriculum on retreat. I’m close, though. Another full day of writing should be enough to wrap up what I need to submit to Lamaze International’s lead nurse planner, Susan Givens. An interesting sidelight of the trainer process is that I’m getting laser focused on my own childbirth classes. What are the strongest pieces of my curriculum? Where are the weak links? If I’m training new educators, I want to be sure I’m modeling the best teaching techniques in my own classes. So tucked into the calendar this summer, I have another full day reserved for finishing my trainer curriculum, and also a full day to re-examine and revitalize a few topic areas in my own eight-week Lamaze series.

I’m still puzzling through a few technical issues with the curriculum. I’m working toward enough structure that I can make sure attendees get everything they need, but also some flexibility to let them take the reins at times. I want to model the same innovative teaching techniques I hope they will use in their own classes. I’m grateful for my experience not only as a childbirth educator for the past decade but also as an approved birth doula trainer for DONA International. I have a great sense of both the research and the reality of adult learning. Also on the docket: figuring out how my business curriculum will be incorporated into my Lamaze workshop. Should it be part of the core training, or an extra day or half day that new educators can opt into if they’re planning to teach independently? Business building is a big part of my focus in the birth world, so this piece of the curriculum is really important to me! Some of this will come clear as I finish writing, but experience also tells me that things will shift and adjust as I start to train and get a sense for what works best in action.

To use a birth analogy (because Lamaze educators can turn everything into a birth analogy!), my trainer curriculum feels like it’s in transition. Intense. A little overwhelming. But transition! What a fantastic place to be! Almost there. Keep going. Almost there.

About Jessica English

jenglish-headshot-2015-2Jessica English, LCCE, FACCE, CD/BDT(DONA), is the founder of Heart | Soul | Business. A former marketing and PR executive, she owns Birth Kalamazoo, a thriving doula and childbirth education agency in Southwest Michigan. Jessica trains birth doulas and (soon!) Lamaze childbirth educators, as well as offering heart-centered business-building workshops for all birth professionals.

Childbirth Education, Guest Posts, Lamaze International, Lamaze News, Series: On the Independent Track to Becoming a Lamaze Trainer , , , , ,

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