24h-payday

Archive

Archive for the ‘Lamaze International’ Category

How to Subscribe to or Follow Science & Sensibility and Your Favorite Blogs

January 29th, 2015 by avatar

rss-feed_1About 18 months ago I wrote about the six blogs that I thought every childbirth educator and other birth professionals would benefit from reading.  It might be time for an updated list or to add a few more of my favorites to the original post.  But, before I did that, I wanted to explain how to subscribe to a blog post so you are sure not to miss any good content from those blogs or your favorites.

What does “subscribe” to a blog mean?

When you subscribe to a blog, you are asking for new posts to be “pushed” to you when they are published.  They can be delivered to you via a blog reader (more on that later) or directly into your inbox. Subscribing means information comes to you, just like a magazine you subscribe to shows up in your mailbox at home or work.  You don’t have to remember to buy it at the store or read it at the library. It should not cost anything to subscribe to a blog that is available to the public.

What does “follow” a blog mean?

Following a blog is almost the same thing as subscribing.  It seems that people use the term “follow” when they use a blog reader and subscribe when it comes by email, but really, it is the same thing.

Why should I subscribe or follow a blog?

There are many interesting, useful and informative blogs out there that publish information that is helpful to your profession or that cover topics that you enjoy learning more about.  In your internet travels, you no doubt may come across many.  You can certainly bookmark the blog urls of your favorites and check back from time to time to see if anything new has been posted.  But this is not a very efficient use of your time.  And sometimes you forget to come back and check.  Why not have the new posts delivered to you at the moment they are published.  This way you never miss a post.

Getting updates into your email inbox

Screen Shot 2015-01-28 at 9.32.14 PM

Science & Sensibility Subcription

Many blogs will have a subscription box or sign up area somewhere on the blog that requests you enter your email address and you will be signed up to receive new blog posts delivered to your inbox.  You may need to confirm your request by replying to the confirmation email sent to you or clicking on the link in that confirmation email.  Check your spam and junk folders if this confirmation email does not arrive shortly.  Sometimes it could get caught up in your spam filters.  Once you confirm your subscription request, you are good to go.  Every time your favorite blog publishes something new, you get the content delivered directly to your inbox and you can read it on any device or computer.

Using an RSS Reader

RSS stands for “Really Simple Syndication” and an RSS Reader just means that you can read all your subscriptions in one place, at one time, whenever you want. The program “feeds” you the information There are many RSS Readers to choose from, and until it went away, Google Reader was my favorite.  Currently, I use Feedly which is one of the most popular, if not the most popular RSS Reader out there and very simple to use.  Many RSS Readers are free.  I have never paid for one and I am not sure I would, as the free services work just fine for me.

Screen Shot 2015-01-28 at 10.18.19 PM

S&S sign up using Feedly

After setting up an account with the RSS Reader of your choice, you then go about telling the service what blogs you want to “follow.”  There is usually an “add new content” button.  You put the url of the blog you want to follow in that box and hit return.  Remember to use the main domain of the blog – for example http://scienceandsensibility.org if I wanted to follow this blog.  Don’t use the url from one particular post.

Sometimes, a blog will have the RSS logo, that makes it easy to subscribe or follow the blog.  You click on the symbol, indicate what Reader you are using and it adds it from there.  But in general, I tend to copy the url of the blog and enter it myself.

Once subscribed in a reader, you can sort all your “feeds” or subscriptions into categories.  The programs allow you to set up folders that can hold many subscriptions.  You might have a category for childbirth topics, and one for recipes and another for your favorite hobby.  I tend to just keep them all in one big list (I subscribe to over 400 blogs) and leave it at that.  It is your choice.

The reader can show you unread blogs only (i.e., when there is new content) or all the content.  Kind of like your inbox can show you unread messages or all the messages.  There are other options to toggle on and off, depending on the RSS Reader you are working with.  I tend to keep it simple and just have a central list of any new posts from all the blogs I follow as the new ones are released.

Reading on a phone or tablet device

I like to skim my subscriptions or feeds once a day.  I tend to do this at the end of the day, in the evening, on my iPad.  I enjoy reading the blogs on my tablet, easy to move around and navigate on and easy on the eyes.  I use an application called Newsify which is geared for iPods, iPhones and iPads. If you have an another type of device, you will want to find an app that works well on yours.  Reading my feeds on my device lets me easily save those I want to keep for reference, and also makes it easy to share with others via email or social media.  I can also choose to read offline if I wish.  Sometimes I save up a big bunch of unread blog posts to devour on a long airplane flight, when I don’t have internet access.

Conclusion

There is a lot of great content coming out all the time that can help you stay on top of news and information professionally as well as for your personal enjoyment. Subscribing to blogs and getting information delivered to your inbox or your RSS Reader is an easy way to have the content come to you, and be ready and waiting when you want to read it.  Consider subscribing to your favorite blogs and see how easy it is.  Why not try it now with this blog, Science & Sensibility, so you never miss another post!  Let us know how it goes, if this whole process is new to you.

Additional resources

How to Subscribe to RSS Feeds

RSS- What is RSS

 

 

Childbirth Education, Lamaze International, New Research, Science & Sensibility , , , , ,

Become a Lamaze International Member and Reap the Benefits

January 2nd, 2015 by avatar

Join Lamaze NowDid you remember to renew your Lamaze International membership?!  Membership runs with the calendar year, but if it slipped your mind at the end of 2014, don’t hesitate to join or renew now!  You do not have to be a childbirth educator to be a Lamaze International member and support the organization. Here are twelve reasons why everyone should join and become a member of Lamaze. Renew or join now!  Please note: If you are a certified LCCE or are recertifying, your membership is now provided at no cost with your certification/recertification fees, so be sure you are taking advantage of all these benefits as part of your certification.

1. Supporting the Lamaze International Mission

The mission of Lamaze International is to advance safe and healthy pregnancy, birth and early parenting through evidence and advocacy. Our vision is “knowledgeable parents making informed decisions.”

I am a childbirth professional, working with birthing families, new doulas and new childbirth educators.  I find that Lamaze’s mission aligns so well with my own, and how I create my classes and work with families and birth professionals.  I am proud to say that I am a member of Lamaze and an LCCE.  I think that many of today’s families and birth professionals can also respect and relate to Lamaze’s mission and find that their values are in sync with what Lamaze offers to the maternity world.  Your membership dollars, combined with other members’ financial support help Lamaze to fulfill this very important mission.

2. Journal of Perinatal Education

The Journal of Perinatal Education (JPE) is a quarterly journal mailed to the home of all Lamaze members and is  filled with relevant, current research that can change the way you teach or practice.  The JPE offers you insights into current maternity trends, access to in-depth articles and the opportunity to learn from international experts.  The JPE is read by childbirth educators, doulas, midwives, RNs, Doctors, Lactation Counselors and other professionals. Additionally, as a Lamaze member, you have access to back issues of the JPE online.

3. FedEx Office Discounts

Being a member of Lamaze International allows you to receive a  fantastic FedEx Office (Kinko’s) discount that has the opportunity to provide you with significant savings.  All of the discounted services that I use yearly offer me savings that exceed the price of my yearly membership.  I am amazed at the level of savings on some of the products and services I use for my business printing and shipping needs.

4. Reduced Fees for Lamaze Products and Events

As a member of Lamaze, you receive member discounts when you register for the annual conference, free continuing education webinars (contact hours available for an additional fee*) and other Lamaze materials in the Online Education Store.

5. Birth: Issues in Perinatal Care Journal Discounts

Birth is published quarterly and Lamaze members receive a 50% discount on both the hard copy journal and the online journal. Birth: Issues in Perinatal Care is a multidisciplinary, refereed journal devoted to issues and practices in the care of childbearing women, infants, and families. It is written by and for professionals in maternal and neonatal health, nurses, midwives, physicians, public health workers, doulas, psychologists, social scientists, childbirth educators, lactation counselors, epidemiologists, and other health caregivers and policymakers in perinatal care.

6. Your Lamaze Classes Listed on Lamaze Website

If you are a Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator and a current Lamaze member, your childbirth classes can be listed on the Lamaze International website for parents, in the “Find a Lamaze Childbirth Class” section so that those families looking for a childbirth class can locate your offerings. Increase your class enrollment with this members only benefit.

7. Full Cochrane Library Access

Lamaze International members have full access to the Cochrane Library, a collection of databases containing independent evidence to inform healthcare decision-making.  The Cochrane Library is considered the gold standard of evidence based information and if you are looking for the most up-to-date research on topics relevant to obstetrics and maternity care, breastfeeding and newborn issues, this is the ideal place to find the information you are looking for.

8. Lamaze Forums and Community

As a Lamaze International member, you have member access to our professional forums, on-line communities and discussion groups, where you can share teaching ideas, learn how your peers feel and respond to different topics of interest and collaborate with professionals around the world, from the comfort of your own home or office.

9. Members Only Teaching Resources

When you join Lamaze International, you are provided access to teaching handouts and resources to share with your students, and a variety of class-enriching resources to make your course more relevant, useful and informative to the families that you are working with. You can find printable handouts and infographics, and discover new teaching ideas and curriculum.

10. Supporting Lamaze Improves Maternity Care Worldwide

LCCEs attend the DONA Conference
Photo Credit HeatherGail Lovejoy

When you purchase a Lamaze membership, Lamaze International can pool your dollars with other members’ dollars and use some of this income to support and collaborate with other organizations that are leading the way in changing maternity care around the world for the better.  Lamaze International supports and collaborates with the Coalition for Improving Maternity Services (CIMS), Childbirth Connection and others.  Additionally, Lamaze can send representatives to international conferences to represent Lamaze International, create networking opportunities for all of us, collaborate with other maternity leaders and further work to fulfill the mission of Lamaze International and improve birth for women everywhere.

11.  Access to Online Webinars

Lamaze International offers online webinars with leaders in the field of maternal/infant health that are free to Lamaze members and provides contact hours that can be used toward LCCE recertification.  Additionally, these continuing education hours are accepted by other birth organizations as well.

12. A Deductible Business Expense

My membership fee is a deductible business expense and by purchasing it before the end of the year, I can deduct the cost on my taxes.

Where else can a membership in a maternal infant organization produce such tangible benefits and savings for you and combine with other membership funds to improve maternity care worldwide?  I am proud and excited to renew my Lamaze International membership every year and invite you to renew yours, if you haven’t already.  If you are not a member of Lamaze, then now is the time to join, so that you can reap the professional benefits for the full calendar year.  For a full list of member benefits , please see the member benefits page on the website. Don’t hesitate, join or renew now!

Can you share how being a Lamaze International member has benefited you? Why are YOU a Lamaze member?  Tell us what it means to you in the comments section.

* Updated 1/3/2015 to reflect 2015 policy and program changes.

 

Lamaze International, Lamaze News , ,

Best in Birth for 2014

December 30th, 2014 by avatar

By Cara Terreri, LCCE

Best of  BirthAs the year winds down this week, many will take stock of the best and worst of happenings throughout the year. In the world of maternity care, there are several notable and promising advances, discoveries, and recommendations in care practices. ICYMI (in case you missed it), we’d like to share the best in birth for 2014.

The Journal of Midwifery and Women’s Health released important new U.S. research on the outcomes of home birth entitled Outcomes of Care for 16,924 Planned Home Births in the United States: The Midwives Alliance of North America Statistics Project, 2004 to 2009.” This was the first study on outcomes of home births since 2005. For a in-depth review of the study, check out this and this.

In February, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine issued a joint Obstetric Care Consensus Statement: Safe Prevention of the Primary Cesarean Delivery. The statement aims to change the way practitioners manage labor in an effort to reduce the cesarean rate, and was considered by many a major game changer in how women are cared for in labor. The ACOG press release is here, which provides more detail of the study. Science & Sensibility covered it here.

Evidence Based Birth a well-respected resource site for birth practices, published the article, “Evidence for the Vitamin K Shot in Newborns,” which examines Vitamin K deficiency bleeding (VKDB), a rare but serious consequence of insufficient Vitamin K in a newborn or infant that can be prevented by administering an injection of Vitamin K at birth. The article helps to clear up many misconceptions and questions surrounding the Vitamin K shot.  Sharon Muza interviews Rebecca on this topic here.

Lamaze International launched a series of online parent classes that cover a variety of topics on pregnancy, birth, and breastfeeding. The online classes are presented in an interactive, engaging format with unlimited access so you can complete the class at your own pace. They provide vital information, and are recommended to be followed up with a traditional, in-depth childbirth class. Topics covered include, VBAC, Six Healthy Birth Practices, and Breastfeeding Basics.  A Pain Management and Coping Skills class will be released shortly in the new year.

The journal Birth published a study that compared the difference between nonpharmacologic (aka: non-drug) pain management during labor with more typical pain relief techniques. Results showed that nonpharmacologic pain relief techniques can reduce the need for medical interventions. Read an in-depth review here.

The “family-centered cesarean” birth continued to emerge as an option for more families as new providers and hospitals adopted practices to facilitate the approach. For more information, check out the Family Centered Cesarean Project and this article.

Out-of-hospital (OOH) births rates continued to increase, according to a report from the National Center for Health Statistics released this year. The report also showed that OOH births generally had lower risk than hospital births, with lower percentages of preterm birth and low birth weight.

Work continued on human microbiome (aka: healthy gut bacteria) research, and further investigation is underway on the impact of cesarean birth and infant gut bacteria colonization, and the potential benefits of artificially transferring mother’s bacteria to baby.

What other groundbreaking maternal infant topics do you feel made a big leap in 2014?  Share the topic and any relevant links in our comments section.

About Cara Terreri

cara headshotCara began working with Lamaze two years before she became a mother. Somewhere in the process of poring over marketing copy in a Lamaze brochure and birthing her first child, she became an advocate for childbirth education. Three kids later (and a whole lot more work for Lamaze), Cara is the Site Administrator for Giving Birth with Confidence, the Lamaze blog for and by women and expectant families. Cara continues to have a strong passion for the awesome power and beauty in pregnancy and birth, and for helping women to discover their own power and ability through birth. It is her hope that through the GBWC site, women will have a place to find and offer positive support to other women who are going through the amazing journey to motherhood.

ACOG, Childbirth Education, Evidence Based Medicine, Guest Posts, Lamaze International, New Research , ,

New Lamaze Infographic on Labor Support and Doulas!

December 23rd, 2014 by avatar

Lamaze International has been periodically releasing a comprehensive series of infographics designed to help consumers understand maternal infant best practices.  These easy to read, evidence based infographics can help families to know the facts and supports the “Push for Your Baby” campaign that can help improve birth outcomes.

doula info 1

The newest infographic covering the topic of labor support helps families to understand that building a great support team, including adding a professional doula, can reduce the risk of unwanted interventions and non-medically needed cesareans.  “Who Says Three’s A Crowd”  lets families know that while health care providers can offer emotional support and physiological comfort measures, their responsibilities and patient load may prevent them from offering the continuous support that has been shown to reduce cesareans, need for pitocin, epidurals and improve satisfaction with the birth experience.

Lamaze International’s Healthy Birth Practice #3 “Bring a loved one, friend or doula for continuous support” goes into further detail about the benefits of having good labor support, and includes a short but informative video that supports the third birth practice.  The labor support infographic is a very simple and attractive learning tool that educators can use to teach from or make available in handouts or on the classroom wall for passive learning.

doula info 2

Available infographics include:

Lamaze International provides links to specific infographics for viewing online and makes them available in downloadable “pdf” or “jpeg” formats. Check out the Lamaze International Professionals website here, specifically the infographics page, to see all the infographics.  Parents can find them at the “Push for Your Baby” website.

Have you checked out the infographics?  Have you shared them with your students and clients?  Which one is your favorite?  How do you use them for teaching?  We’d love to hear from you!

Childbirth Education, Doula Care, Evidence Based Medicine, Healthy Birth Practices, Lamaze International , , , , , ,

Series: Building Your Birth Business: Online Marketing for Birth Professionals – A Beginner’s Guide

December 11th, 2014 by avatar

By Janelle Durham, MSW, LCCE

As we move into the new year, you may be considering starting your own independent childbirth education or birth related business.  Maybe you already have such a business already established but are looking to take it to the next level. Today’s post is part of a new series: Building Your Birth Business.

 Perhaps the organization you work for would like to grow their offerings geared toward families in the childbearing year.  Janelle Durham, a birth and parent educator, working for several programs in the Pacific Northwest has put together this beginner’s guide for the options available to reach your target audience of expectant parents through online marketing.  This resource can help you to get started in designing and placing ads and then tracking your success. – Sharon Muza,  Science & Sensibility Community Manager

Introduction

This guide is designed for non-profit organizations or individuals that serve expectant parents or young families (though other programs may also find it useful). I know there are a lot of folks doing great work, but we all have limited advertising budgets, and it’s hard to get the word out sometimes. We try things like a print ad in the newspaper once a year for $250 and hope that gets us some people.(But ask today’s parents if they read the newspaper.. I’m guessing the answer will be no. Most of the people who see your newspaper ad will be past the age of child-rearing. They’re not your target audience.)

social-media-marketingWith today’s online marketing, there are much more effective ways to spend your ad dollars that allows you to put your ad in front of a very targeted audience of young parents in the places where they look everyday (Facebook, online search engines, and YouTube. To see statistics on who uses social media, click here.)  Here’s an overview of your options, with links to more details. (And, of course, once you have the basic vocabulary and ideas I share here, you can do online searching to learn lots more about all these topics.)

Facebook Ads

71% of people who use the Internet use Facebook. 63% of Facebook users visit Facebook every day. (source) This is where parents’ eyes are looking!

Facebook ads allow you to place an ad right on the user’s “feed” – not off on a sidebar that they’ve learned to ignore. They can just read the ad, or they may choose to click on it. (You choose what happens when they click – they could click to like your Facebook page, or the click could link to your website.) You only pay if they click on your ad.

Facebook ads let you target your preferred customer or cient. For example, I can target my ad to people that Facebook has determined are: women, 24 – 44 years old, living in Bellevue, WA or within a ten mile radius (but excluding Seattle) who have purchased baby food, toys for young children, or clothes for young children. Facebook says that’s a possible audience of 5800. For $10, I put an ad in front of 995 of those parents, 23 clicked through to our website to learn more. That’s 43 cents for each person who came to our site to learn more – good bang for your buck! How to place ads on Facebook.

Facebook Boosts

Facebook also allows you to “boost” a post. So, you write a regular post on your business page and all your page followers see it. Then you pay for a boost to put it on the feeds of people who don’t yet follow your page. For $10 I boosted a post about local classes to local parents. It displayed to 1745,  and 36 clicked through. Cost 28 cents a click. How to Boost.

Your ability to target your demographic is more limited with boosts than with Facebook ads, so I prefer ads. I do like using boosts to promote a link to a video. (see below)

Google ads and Bing ads

The big picture is: you create a short ad. You choose whether it will display on search networks, display networks, or both. Then you define what kinds of people to show it to (geographic region, etc.). Then you define “keywords.”

For “search network advertising”: When someone in your region searches for those keywords, then the ad will display. For “display network” your ad will appear when people are looking at related content, even if they didn’t use your search terms to get there. When I ran ads on Bing, for $10, the ad would display to about 500 people, and about 25 would click through. On Google, $10 would display to about 1500 people, but only about 9 or 10 would click through. If you were just trying to get your name out there, Google may be a better bet, because there’s more “impressions” (times your ad is shown.) If you really want people to click to your site to learn more, Bing may be a better bet, because more will click through. Or, you may choose to run a low budget ad on both networks to reach the widest variety of users.

I personally prefer Facebook ads to search engine ads, because as a user, I find I read Facebook ads, and I totally ignore search engine ads. Also, Facebook allows me to target more specifically. However, if you think people will be actively searching out programs like yours and you have a really good sense of what keywords they would use, search engine ads are certainly worth doing. Learn how to place ads on Google and Yahoo Bing.

Promoting a video

You may choose to make a video to promote your program. If you do, then upload it to YouTube, then embed it somewhere on your website (check the help info in your website tool to learn how to do this.) Then promote it.

On Facebook, you can put a post with a link to the video, and then boost that post. (My $10 test ad displayed to 1700, and 62 clicked through.) On Google Ads, you can create a “video campaign” (learn how and learn more). Ads display on YouTube. (My test ad displayed to about 950 people, 24 clicked through.) Or you can set up your ad (“promote your video”) on YouTube directly. (Learn how.)

Check your web presence

When you spend money on internet advertising, most of those ads will take people directly to your website to learn more about your program. PLEASE make sure your website is the best it can be, free of grammar and spelling errors, graphically pleasant  and contains all the essential info they would need! Learn more here.

Is it working?

When you spend money on an ad in traditional media (newspapers, mailings, radio ads), it can be hard to tell: how many people saw the ad? How many were your target demographic? Did they take any actions after seeing the ad?

It’s easier to get those answers for online advertising. All the services listed above will give you all sorts of statistics (analytics) on how many people saw the ad, how many clicked through, what portion of the video they watched, and so on. This helps you decide whether the ad was money well spent.

It’s even better if you can take this to the next level. Many websites allow you to see your statistics. So, for example, on a day you ran an ad, you can see not only how many people clicked in from your ad, but what they did once they got to your site. Did they click on links on the page? Did they look at other pages? How much time did they spend on your site? There are also some external tools that can track statistics, like Google Analytics.

It’s even better if you can do “conversion tracking” which shows more specifically what a user did on your site after clicking through from an ad. These articles might be helpful to you: How to Track Facebook Ad Conversions and Understanding Conversion Tracking.

Staying up to date

The world of internet advertising is always changing, so if you want to be effective, update your website and your marketing strategy on a regular basis.

In this overview, I’ve shared what I learned this summer about online marketing. I need to say that the online world changes very quickly, and the processes might not be the same and you might not get the same results in September 2015 as I got in September 2014.

Have you had any experience with online marketing for your childbirth education or other birth business?  Please share your successes and learning moments with us in the comments section. – SM

About Janelle Durham

Janelle headshotJanelle Durham, MSW, LCCE. Janelle has taught childbirth preparation, breastfeeding, and newborn care for 14 years. She trains childbirth educators for the Great Starts program at Parent Trust for Washington Children, and teaches young families through Bellevue College’s Parent Education program. She is a co-author of Pregnancy, Childbirth, and the Newborn and writes blogs/websites on: pregnancy & birth; breastfeeding and newborn care; and parenting toddlers & preschoolers. Contact Janelle and learn more at www.janelledurham.com

 

Childbirth Education, Guest Posts, Lamaze International, Series: Building Your Birth Business , , ,