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BABE Series: The Six Ways to Progress in Labor – Making It Memorable!

July 30th, 2015 by avatar
© Sharon Muza

© Sharon Muza

Time for another post in the “Brilliant Activities for Birth Educators” (BABE) series.  The purpose of this monthly series is to share engaging, interactive and effective teaching ideas that childbirth educators can use in their classes.  We know that when families are participatory, engaged and interacting with their partners, other class members and the instructor, real learning (and retention) happens!  Today, I share an idea I modified from an activity that I originally saw Michele Deck, former Lamaze International President and exceptional trainer, share at a the REACHE conference in Tacoma, WA several years ago.

Introduction

In my childbirth classes, I like to have parents understand that there are many ways that their bodies are preparing for birth. Changes happen in the weeks, days and hours leading up to the moment of birth.  I feel that if parents understand the six ways to progress in labor, they can appreciate that at times, cervical dilation (the most “well-known” of the six ways to progress) may not be changing, but other changes may continue to show that their body and baby are working towards the big moment of birth. Parents leave class understanding that labor progress is a coordinated effort by the parent’s body and the baby that incorporates many different changes.

The six different ways that progress is assessed include:

  1. The cervix is moving forward
  2. The cervix is ripening
  3. The cervix is shortening/thinning (effacement)
  4. The cervix is opening (dilating)
  5. The baby is descending (station)
  6. The baby is rotating

Objective

At the end of the activity, class members will be able to describe the six ways that labor progress can be measured and explain why the focus should not just be on dilation, but rather on the synchronized way that change is happening throughout the pre-labor and labor period.  My hope is families will recall this information during labor, if the cervix is measured and the cervix has not dilated significantly since the last exam.

© Sharon Muza

© Sharon Muza

Supplies I use

The supplies for this activity are very simple.  I tape a large piece of newsprint at the front of the room, which has a rectangle drawn on it, divided up into a “table” of 2 squares x 3 squares with a colorful marker. I give each class participant a similar table, on a regular 8 1/2 x 11 sheet of paper, and make sure they have a pen.  I have several different color markers for them to use in front of the class. I also use the standard childbirth class teaching tools – the fetal model, a knitted uterus, and a pelvis.

How I teach it

I cover the six ways to progress after we have discussed the events of late pregnancy and before the stages of labor. When I start the activity, I share that we will be discussing the six ways to progress in labor and that many people, parents and health care providers alike, focus on dilation, but there are many ways to assess progress and it is important to understand all of them.  After I cover the first way to measure progress, the cervix moving from posterior to anterior (which you can teach using your favorite technique), I ask them to draw a simple symbol (“like a kindergarten student might draw, quick, simple and without words”) in the first square.  The symbol that they draw will help them to remember what happens first.

After they have drawn their first symbol on their own paper, I ask for a volunteer to come up and draw it on the class sheet up front.  Everyone “oohs and aahs” at the class drawing and then all share what they drew.  We move on to the cervix ripening.  Again, I teach this in my typical way and ask them to draw another drawing on their own paper to represent ripening in the second square. Another volunteer comes up to draw for the class and we all share what everyone drew. I repeat this process for all six ways to progress.

Maximum Retention

So that they can really solidify and remember each of the six ways to progress, after we discuss and draw a new square, I go back, and while pointing at the specific square, ask – “what happens first? and second?  and next…?”  The class repeats back what is happening.  After all six ways are completed, I ask them to turn their papers over, and ask randomly – “what happens fourth?”  “and sixth?” “first?” without looking at anything but pointing on the wall, where the squares were located before I took it down.  Every single class member is able to a) identify what happens in each step and b) what that means for the labor, even after I have removed the newsprint.

I let them know that I will randomly ask them this information sometime later on in the series and the person who can answer all six correctly, gets a prize.  A week or so later, in class, I ask for someone to recall the six ways to progress and award a prize to the first person who correctly names them all again! Class members enthusiastically compete with each other to be the first to recall all six ways to progress.

© Sharon Muza

© Sharon Muza

Takeaways

This method of using the squares, both at their seats and in the front of the class, really helps the families to remember the six ways to progress in labor.  There is lots of laughter and admiration for everyone’s clever ideas on how to represent each method, they really remember what the symbols stand for (and the actual action that happens in labor) and they are still remembering it several weeks later.  This activity is always a lot of fun to do in my childbirth classes and appreciated and enjoyed by the participants.

How you can modify this activity?

This activity reinforces retention and can be modified for many purposes in your childbirth classes.  You could do a similar activity for talking about safe sleep, how to tell if baby has a good latch during breastfeeding, or even apply it to Lamaze International’s Six Healthy Birth Practices.  By using the idea of drawing a simple symbol to represent a fact, and being asked to recall it several times, people really find that the information worms its way into their memories, and they can recall it later when it is needed.  After all, several weeks or months can pass from childbirth class to the big event, and anything we can do as childbirth educators to help families retain information for their recall when they need it down the road is a big win!

An invitation

I invite you to draw your ideas for the six ways to progress in labor, or conduct the same process for another childbirth class topic and share it with all of us. What topic ideas do you in mind to try with this method? Send me a picture of what you or your families have drawn, along with your contact information and website, and I can put them all up in another post.  We can even try to guess the topic being discussed from the drawings – and you can see how effective this technique is. I am excited to see what you all come up with.  Send them to me using this email address.

 

Note/Disclaimer: The use of the acronym “BABE” (Brilliant Activities for Birth Educators) is not affiliated with, aligned with or associated with any particular childbirth program or organization.

 

Childbirth Education, Healthy Birth Practices, Push for Your Baby, Series: BABE - Brilliant Activities for Birth Educators , , , ,

Book Review: Birth Ambassadors; Doulas and the Re-Emergence of Woman-Supported Birth in America.

May 7th, 2015 by avatar

By Kim James, BA, BDT(DONA), CD(PALS), ICCE, LCCE

May is International Doula Month and Lamaze International recognizes the importance of labor support. (Note – there are both birth and postpartum doulas who work with families during the childbearing year. We are grateful for the work that they both do.)  In fact, our third Healthy Birth Practice specifically addresses doulas and support people as an effective component of safe and healthy birth. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) in their 2014 Safe Prevention of the Primary Cesarean Obstetric Care Consensus Statement stated “published data indicate that one of the most effective tools to improve labor and delivery outcomes is the continuous presence of support personnel, such as a doula.”  Childbirth educators and health care providers have ample opportunity to inform parents about the benefits of a doula when they are meeting with families and patients.  

In mid-2014, sociologist Christine Morton, Ph.D. with Elayne G. Clift, MA, wrote a book, Birth Ambassadors: Doulas and the Re-Emergence of Woman-Supported Birth in America examining doulas from both an historical perspective as well as an assessment of the role of the doula in current American society . Kim James, LCCE and certified DONA birth doula, reviews this book and shares her perspective and take-aways with readers of this blog.

This book would make a great read for a book club book for birth professionals, and Kim generously shares some discussion questions at the end of today’s post to facilitate your discussion, should you wish to participate.  Alternately, if you have read the book, please feel free to respond in our comments section. 

Science & Sensibility and Lamaze International want to thank all the doulas who work tirelessly to support families as they birth their babies and transition to parenthood. Happy International Doula Month. – Sharon Muza, Science & Sensibility Community Manager. 

idm15 lamazeBirth Ambassadors: Doulas and the Re-Emergence of Woman-Supported Birth in America, written by Christine Morton, Ph.D. with Elayne G. Clift, MAis a thorough and compelling documentary of the history of doula support, the current dilemmas and issues facing the doula occupation, what drives doulas to pursue this work and how the work of doula support might fit into the future as the United States strains to find better ways of providing quality improvements in maternity care. For doula trainers and doulas looking to pursue this work in a professional manner, Birth Ambassadors is critical, mandatory reading. (For trainers and doulas interested in how to use this book to critically assess your work, please see the discussion questions below this article).

But what about for childbirth educators? What in it for them?

While the history is fascinating, it’s the critical sociological analysis of the current dilemmas and issues facing the doula occupation that childbirth educators’ need to thoroughly understand, especially Lamaze certified childbirth educators.

Lamaze International’s third Healthy Care Practice, ‘Bring a Loved One, Friend or Doula for Continuous Support’, outlines why continuous support is important and how a doula performs their work:

  • Continuous support can help alleviate fear and worry.
  • A doula’s intuitive sense and training mean emotional and physical needs are met with timely, individualized care.
  • Greater emotional and physical comfort may encourage the most efficient and healthy labor progress.

While most childbirth educators are aware of the intended benefits of doula care, not all are aware of the dilemmas doulas face in performing their work and the institutional and cultural issues that prevent doulas from having the greatest beneficial impact. Lamaze certified childbirth educators must have a firm understanding of these dilemmas so as not to ‘over-promise’ what the third Lamaze Healthy Care Practice is intended to deliver.

I want to highlight three dilemmas facing doulas that childbirth educators should be aware of and what they can do to educate parents who want doula-supported birth experiences:

Kim James' well read Birth  Ambassadors

Kim James’ well read Birth Ambassadors

First dilemma

The ecological fallacy of applying aggregate results of research that show doula efficacy to an individual family’s outcome. The cultural and institutional context of most US hospital births limit the doula’s efficacy, often by prohibiting truly continuous support and refusing to recognize a doula’s unique scope of practice. Childbirth educators should lead discussions with parents about what hospitals and which care providers in their areas are most and least supportive of doula care. Childbirth educators are instrumental in helping parents understand the questions they can ask during hospital tours and prenatal visits to find out if their chosen place of birth and attendant understand and support doulas attending families at births.

Second dilemma

The frequent contradiction between a doula’s personal values (often a deep belief in the optimality of the midwifery model of care, natural, drug-free childbirth or specific parenting practices) and her obligation to provide unconditional support for parents’ birth and parenting choices. Childbirth educators must help parents clarify their values around birth and parenting so that parents can find the support people who suit them best. Not every doula will be the best support for every parent.

Third dilemma

No occupation-wide standard for training or certification. The competing tensions within doula organizations between increased professionalization and maintaining low barriers to entry for all people to become doulas remain unresolved. While the majority of doulas are well-trained through recognized, long-standing organizations, some will only have received light, if any, training possibly through correspondence and online courses. Not every doula’s skill set is the same. Not every doula will practice within a scope of practice that is evidence based. Not every doula will pledge to follow a recognized code of ethics backed by an organization with an active grievance policy. Childbirth educators who make referrals to families asking for doulas should always make referrals to doulas who are well-trained, consistently receive excellent feedback from the families they serve and most importantly practice in a manner that is consistent with the evidence based third Lamaze Healthy Care Practice.

As a current Lamaze certified childbirth educator and professionally-working certified doula, I found my own experiences reflected in this book. While at times uncomfortable to confront the dilemmas and issues our occupation faces, Birth Ambassadors is well worth reading for the history and reflections for the future. It will give childbirth educators who are not currently practicing doulas good data on what the real impact of doula support means for the families that hire them.

Book club discussion questions

When Birth Ambassadors was newly released, I hosted a book club-style discussion group with several local doulas to discuss this book’s implications for our current and future work. Here are the big questions that came up for our group representing doulas who were well-established in their practices, those who were just starting out and both certified and non-certified doulas.

  • When is your personal bias stronger than your ability to offer unconditional support? (Reference: page 195).
  • Analyze this: “Doulas advocate evidence-based care for physiologic birth, yet are not trained clinically to recognize or treat women when their pregnancies and labors become non-normal”. (Reference: page 37).
  • The original purpose of the first doula organizations was to provide moral support for each other. What do we need from our organizations now? (Reference: page 90)
  • Do we have the training to be professionally non-judgmental? (Reference: page 196).
  • Doula neutrality –When do you abandon it? How do you maintain it? (Reference: page 261).
  • What are the current debates around our standard of practice and code of ethics? (Reference: page 81).
  • Outcome-based care vs emotional companionship: What are you drawn to in this work? (Reference: page 260)
  • Are you comfortable with the “outsider-within” role? Does attract or repel you? (Reference: page 36)

How do you talk about doulas in your childbirth classes?  In your midwifery or obstetrical practice?  Have you read Birth Ambassadors?  What were your big take-aways?  Have you shared Lamaze International’s “Who Says Three’s a Crowd?” infographic with the families you work with?

Note: Christine Morton is a member of Lamaze International’s Board of Directors.

About Kim James 

Kim James HeadshotKim James BA, BDT(DONA), CD(PALS), ICCE, LCCE, is an ICEA and Lamaze certified childbirth educator teaching at Parent Trust for Washington Children/Great Starts where she sits on the Education Committee. She owns and operates www.DoulaMatch.net and is a DONA International and PALS Doulas certified birth doula as well as a DONA-approved birth doula trainer working at the Simkin Center/Bastyr University. Kim also volunteers her time on the Lamaze International membership committee and serves as Washington State DONA SPAR. Her daughters are 9 and 16 years old.  Kim and her family live in Seattle, Washington.

Babies, Book Reviews, Childbirth Education, Doula Care, Guest Posts, Healthy Birth Practices, Lamaze International, Newborns , , , , , ,

Remembering Sheila Kitzinger – An Amazing Advocate for Women, Babies and Families

April 13th, 2015 by avatar

“Sheila Kitzinger is a giant upon whose shoulders we will stand on as we continue our important work for women and their babies. She will be sorely missed.” – Judith Lothian

SheilaKitzinger85Birthday_lSheila Kitzinger passed away on April 12th at her home in Oxfordshire, England after a short illness  Ms. Kitzinger was 86 years old. My eldest son, the father of four, forwarded me the BBC announcement. It shouldn’t have been a shock because I had heard she was very ill. But it is. We have lost a birth advocate who “rocked the boat” and taught the rest of us how to do it.

Kitzinger was an anthropologist and childbirth educator. As a childbirth educator, she pushed educators to go beyond just sharing knowledge, beyond just educating women about birth. She believed that we needed to confront the system in which birth takes place, to advocate in powerful ways so that women could give birth without being traumatized physically or emotionally. She wrote more than 25 books, an endless number of articles in scholarly journals, including her wonderful “Letter from Europe” column in Birth, and a steady stream of newspaper and magazine articles and letters to the editors. Her latest book, A Passion for Birth: My Life; Anthropology, Family, and Feminismher memoirs, will be published in the UK in June.

Sheila came to New York City in the 1970s several times. I was a young mother and new childbirth educator who knew nothing about Kitzinger before I heard her speak. Her passion, her knowledge, and her genuine interest in everyone she met inspired and motivated me, really all of us, to meet the challenges (and they were substantial) that we faced back then. I have spent the last 40 years reading literally everything Sheila Kitzinger has written. Many of those books and articles I have read over and over again, always learning something new. I consider Sheila Kitzinger one of my most important mentors, although we only spoke at length on four occasions in all those years.rediscovering birth kitzinger

With a handful of others, Kitzinger turned the world of birth upside down. Although we still have a long way to go, Sheila Kitzinger’s work has made contributions that simply cannot be measured. Kitzinger’s work going back to the 1970s on episiotomy and the value and importance of home birth were the start of what would become prolific contributions. Her books for women on pregnancy and childbirth, breastfeeding, sex and pregnancy, and the sexuality of birth and breastfeeding can’t be beat. Her work on post traumatic birth in the Uk was groundbreaking. Her books on the politics of birth, the culture of birth, becoming a mother, and becoming a grandmother are major contributions to the literature. Rediscovering Birth is a personal favorite. If that book doesn’t inspire women to think differently about birth, I don’t know what can!

sheila kitzinger 2The article that made the biggest difference in my life was “Should Childbirth Educators Rock the Boat?” published in Birth in 1993. At the time I was new to the Board of Directors of Lamaze International (then ASPO Lamaze) and was soon to become President of the organization. Kitzinger wrote powerfully of the need for childbirth educators to not just teach women about birth but to advocate within the system for change, to take strong stands in support of normal physiologic birth, home birth, and humane, empowering childbirth. Her call to action drove my own work within Lamaze. The result was a philosophy of birth that was courageous and groundbreaking and has driven the work of the organization since then. Advocacy is a competency of a Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator and the mission of the organization clearly identifies the role of advocacy. Lamaze International’s six evidence based Healthy Birth Practices “rock the boat” of the standardized childbirth education class that creates good patients and hospitals that claim to provide safe care to women and babies. When The Official Lamaze Guide: Giving Birth with Confidence was first published in 2005, Sheila reviewed the book. In her review she wrote, “…It’s humane, funny, tender, down-to-earth and joyful. Essential reading for all pregnant women who seek autonomy in childbirth.” I wanted to tell her – “Without your passion and inspiration that book might not have been written.”

There are a number of other bits of wisdom from Kitzinger that I often quote. They have made a difference to me and, I suspect, to everyone who knows Sheila’s work.

  • What breastfeeding mothers need most is a healthy dose of confidence
  • Home birth should be a safe, accessible option for women
  • Touch in childbirth has changed from warm, human touch to the disconnected touch of intravenous, fetal monitors, blood pressure cuffs
  • Women know how to give birth
  • The clock is perhaps the most destructive piece of modern technology

Kitzinger gave me a healthy dose of confidence in myself and in the importance of what we do in small and big ways as we go about the work of changing the world of birth. She convinced me that talking about birth and writing about birth, even if only to the choir, makes a difference. We know we’re not alone and we become more passionate and more committed. We develop the courage to “rock the boat”.

Sheila Kitzinger is a giant upon whose shoulders we will stand on as we continue our important work for women and their babies. She will be sorely missed. May she rest in peace. Our deepest sympathies go out to her family and friends.

Do you have a memory or story to share about Sheila Kitzinger?  How has she or her work impacted you personally or professionally?  Share your stories in our comments section. – SM

About Judith Lothian

@ Judith Lothian

@ Judith Lothian

Judith Lothian, PhD, RN, LCCE, FACCE is a nurse and childbirth educator. She is an Associate Professor at the College of Nursing, Seton Hall University and the current Chairperson of the Lamaze Certification Council Governing Body. Judith is also the Associate Editor of the Journal of Perinatal Education and writes a regular column for the journal. Judith is the co-author of The Official Lamaze Guide: Giving Birth with Confidence. Her research focus is planned home birth and her most recent publication is Being Safe: Making the Decision to Have a Planned Home Birth in the US published in the Journal of Clinical Ethics (Fall 2013).

Babies, Breastfeeding, Childbirth Education, Guest Posts, Healthy Birth Practices, Home Birth, Infant Attachment, Lamaze International, Maternity Care, Midwifery, Newborns , , , ,

Advocacy: Lamaze International Leaders on Capitol Hill

April 7th, 2015 by avatar

By John Richardson, Director, Government Relations, Lamaze International

I am proud of being both a member of Lamaze International and a Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator for many reasons.  Today’s post by John Richardson, Lamaze International’s Director of Government Relations is just one reason why I am happy to pay my membership dues and be a part of the Lamaze organization.  Lamaze is actively working in both the private sector and with public/governmental leaders to help every family to have access to the resources to have a safe and healthy birth.  Today on the blog, we share about how our Board of Directors met with Congressmen and Congresswomen to share the importance of an evidence based childbirth education class being available to all families.  My certifying organization works hard for me and the families I teach every day.  – Sharon Muza, Science & Sensibility Community Manager.

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Lamaze BoD on Capitol Hill, 2015

Advocacy is a foundational element of the Lamaze International mission to advance safe and healthy pregnancy, birth and early parenting through evidence-based education and advocacy. Assisting women and their families to make informed decisions for childbearing and acting as an advocate to promote, support, and protect safe and healthy birth are two core competencies of a Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator.

Advocacy comes in many different forms. The new Lamaze Strategic Framework specifically calls for taking advocacy efforts to the next level, focusing on government and legislative advocacy — leveraging strategic partnerships to advocate for perinatal/childbirth education coverage under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and partnering with insurance companies, including the Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services (CMS), to become part of the “bundled care” system. (Bundled care payment programs refer to the concept of grouping together the multiple services associated with a certain health “episode” versus the current fee for service system where each service associated with a condition is charged separately, and is one of the ACA’s many attempts to incentivize health care providers to be more cost efficient.)

BoD President Robin Elise Weiss and BOD Christine Morton

BoD President Robin Elise Weiss and BOD Christine Morton

Over the years, Lamaze has been involved in a variety of coalition and advocacy efforts related to improving access to high-quality maternity care that includes evidence based childbirth education by qualified educators and the promotion of breastfeeding within the health care industry. These efforts will continue with Lamaze taking its message directly to Capitol Hill to have a stronger voice with federal policymakers on behalf of the organization, its members, and the women and families that Lamaze serves. We want to let Congress know that Lamaze International provides gold standard childbirth education which can play an important role in promoting healthier outcomes for mother and baby and reducing healthcare costs and burdens on the healthcare system.

What does advocacy look like?

Advocacy campaigns at the federal level in the United States are typically a set of actions targeted to create support for a specific policy or proposal. The goals of an advocacy campaign may include drafting and passing a new law, drafting and passing amendments to existing laws, commenting on regulation, or influencing public perception and awareness of a particular issue.

Why is advocacy important for Lamaze?

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Board member Alice Turner

The delivery of health care is one of the most regulated industries in the United States. State and federal regulations often define whether services are covered by insurance, which practitioners are allowed to deliver services, the manner in which services are delivered, and how much individual practitioners and health care organizations are reimbursed. Naturally, there are a lot of people and organizations invested in steering and influencing these policies. There are literally thousands of issues and groups vying for policymakers’ attention. For Lamaze, it is critical to engage directly in advocacy activities so that policymakers become aware of the issues that are important to our organization and make them priorities.

There have been several recent successful advocacy initiatives to improve care for pregnant and postpartum women. For example, Lamaze has worked in collaboration with other organizations and lawmakers to improve breastfeeding services under the Affordable Care Act. As a result, there are several benefits now available to women who receive coverage through the Health Insurance Marketplaces (exchanges) and private non-grandfathered plans. Benefits such as lactation support and counseling by trained professionals are now covered without co-pay or co-insurance. Breast pumps are also covered at no charge and most employers must provide access to clean and private locations to pump for women who are hourly employees.

These victories are impressive and it is important to note that they did not occur in a vacuum. Advocates flooded the halls of Congress for years to ensure that policymakers appreciated the importance of breastfeeding. A key component of the success of these advocacy efforts was that they were based on research, focused on higher quality health outcomes, and provided fiscal benefits to the health care system and the federal government.

The Lamaze Board of Directors’ “Hill Day”

cbe graphicBearing all this in mind and in conjunction with their in-person meeting in Washington, DC, members of the Lamaze Board of Directors took to Capitol Hill on March 19, 2015 to meet with their Representatives and Senators about the excellent childbirth education that Lamaze provides and its potential to reduce costs and improve outcomes. The members of the Board met with a total of 23 Congressional offices, the majority of whom sit on committees with jurisdiction over health policy.

Our advocacy efforts on Capitol Hill centered on the following core messages:

  1. Promoting greater utilization of evidence-based childbirth education is a critical element in closing quality outcomes gaps and reducing unnecessary costs. In the face of high rates of cesarean sections, early inductions, and maternal/infant mortality, there is an increasing imperative for women to be informed and in charge of their maternity care to improve birth outcomes.

Maternal or neonatal hospital stays make up the greatest proportion of hospitalizations among infants, younger adults and patients covered by private insurance and Medicaid, which is why improvements in care are a major opportunity to reduce overall healthcare spending. Increasing quality outcomes by reducing the rates of unnecessary interventions, such as early induction of labor and cesarean section, are critical to reduce healthcare spending, particularly with Medicaid.

  1. The ACA has provided an opportunity for millions of uninsured Americans to access health care coverage through the creation of the exchanges. For those that do not enroll in a plan during the “open” enrollment period, there are qualifying “life events” that trigger special enrollment periods. One of those life events is when a woman gives birth. After the birth, the mother can sign herself and her infant up for coverage.

Lamaze believes, along with many others, that pregnancy, rather than birth, should be the life event that triggers the special enrollment period. Recently, 37 Senators and 55 Representatives sent a letter to U.S. Health & Human Services Secretary Sylvia Mathews Burwell  requesting this change. It appears Secretary Burwell can make this change administratively, as it does not require an act of Congress. Lamaze will join a chorus of other organizations that are making this request directly to the Secretary. Lamaze will also emphasize the importance of ensuring that ACA and state Medicaid plans include childbirth education as a covered service under maternity care benefits.

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Hill Day meetings

While meeting and communicating with legislators and staff on Capitol Hill may seem intimidating, it is actually very easy. Legislators are elected (and re-elected) by their constituents (you) so they have an obligation to listen to their constituents (you). That is a very important dynamic to remember. They are naturally inclined to help address the issues raised by their constituents.

However, advocates should always be well-prepared, a task that proved to be almost second nature for the Lamaze Board members as they met with Congressional offices. As experts in the field and natural educators, Lamaze leadership did a fantastic job representing the views of childbirth educators and establishing a rapport with the officials and staffers they met – the most important accomplishment of any first meeting on Capitol Hill.

Check out all the pictures of our Board of Directors on the “Hill” last month here.

Getting Involved

If you want to get involved and contact or meet with Congressional offices in your state, the most important action is to convey who you are, what you do, how you do it, and why it is important. Then, continue a dialogue of how specific policies might be improved for safer, higher quality, lower cost birth outcomes. In preparation for the first Lamaze “Hill Day,” several key documents were developed, including a policy paper and supporting documents to convey Lamaze’s core message in meetings with Congressional offices. By following this link, you can access and use these documents for advocacy efforts with your state’s representatives and in your local communities with insurers, health care providers, and hospitals.

Providing Lamaze’s unique perspective on the state and national level is extremely important and we can only be successful with the help of our members and supporters. In the coming months, we will provide a webinar on how to become an effective advocate and what Lamaze is doing to have an impact on access to high-quality childbirth education. Stay tuned!  If you are already an advocate in your community, on the county or state level or even nationally, share what you are doing to help families receive good care and improve outcomes in our comments section.

About John Richardson

John_Richardson headshot 2015

© John Richardson

John Richardson joined SmithBucklin, Lamaze International’s management company, in 2001 as Director of Government Relations, Healthcare Practice Group. He guides the policy efforts of healthcare organizations whose members include healthcare administrators; allied health professionals; physicians and hospitals. His experience provides his clients with a deep understanding of policy and politics and their effects on the healthcare system.

John lobbies Congress and government agencies at the federal level and also develops strategy for state lobbying efforts. He also has experience pursuing client objectives such as the development of practice guidelines, CPT codes, evidence based research, and technologies that promote efficiencies within healthcare administration.

Prior to joining SmithBucklin, John served as an Associate to the House Committee on Appropriations for a former member of the committee. Preceding his work of 5 years on the Hill, John acquired extensive political and grassroots experience working as a campaign aide to congressional and presidential campaigns.

A New Hampshire native, he graduated with a B.A. in Political Science from Roger Williams University in Bristol, R.I, and currently resides in Bowie, MD with his wife Kristin and sons Garrett and Holden.

 

Childbirth Education, Evidence Based Medicine, Guest Posts, Healthcare Reform, Healthy Birth Practices, Lamaze International, Lamaze News, Maternal Quality Improvement, Push for Your Baby, Research for Advocacy , , , , , ,

New Electronic Fetal Monitoring Infographic Along with Printables of All Infographics!

February 19th, 2015 by avatar

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Lamaze International has released a new infographic; “Can Good Intentions Backfire in Labor? A closer look at continuous electronic fetal monitoring (EFM). This infographic is suitable for childbirth educators, doulas and birth professionals to use and share with clients and students.

Many birthing people and their families feel that monitoring in the form of continuous EFM (CEFM) during labor means a safer outcome for both the pregnant person and baby.  But as the infographic clearly states, (and as the research shows) since the invention of the continuous EFM, more than 60 years ago, newborn outcomes have not improved and in fact worsened.  CEFM used on normal, healthy, low risk labors does not make things better and can often create a situation that requires action (such as a cesarean birth) when the reality is that all was fine.

EFMInfographic_FINALAs educators, we have a responsibility to the families we work with to share what the evidence shows about continuous fetal monitoring.  Families may be surprised to learn that CEFM is not necessary for a spontaneous labor that is progressing normally and with a baby who is tolerating labor well.  Many of us may cover this topic when we talk about the 4th Healthy Birth Practice – Avoid Interventions that are Not Medically Necessary.  CEFM during a low risk, spontaneous labor is not medically necessary.  Helping families to understand this information and setting them up to have conversations with their health care providers about when CEFM might become necessary is an important discussion to have in childbirth class. Now there is this Lamaze International infographic on CEFM to help you facilitate conversations with your clients and students.

Lamaze International has also listened to the needs of educators and in addition to having the infographics available on a web page, all of the infographics are available as printable 8 1/2″ x 11″ handouts that you can share with families.  Alternately, for versions to laminate or hang in your classroom or office, you can choose to print the jpg versions in the original format. And of course, they will also reside on the Lamaze International Professional website.  Hop on over to check out all the infographics on a variety of topics.

Parents can find the EFM infographic as part of the educational material on the EFM information page on the parent website.

How do you cover the topic of continuous electronic fetal monitoring in your classes?  Will you be likely to use this new infographic as part of your curriculum?  Let us know in the comments section below.

Childbirth Education, Evidence Based Medicine, Fetal Monitoring, Healthy Birth Practices, Lamaze International, Maternal Quality Improvement, Medical Interventions, Push for Your Baby, Uncategorized , , , , , ,

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