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Introducing the Lamaze International LCCE Educator Social Media Guide

July 23rd, 2015 by avatar

LI_0350215_LCCE-SocialMediaGuide-FINALThis past Tuesday, I collected and shared a multitude of Lamaze International resources that are available on a variety of social media platforms that many of you might already be familiar with – Pinterest, YouTube, Facebook and many more.  The vast majority of these resources are available to any birth professional or consumer, and a scarce few are limited to Lamaze International members.  There is one more resource for Lamaze International members that I would like to make you aware of – the just released LCCE Educator Social Media Guide.  The Social Media Guide satisfies one of the Lamaze International Strategic Framework Goals for 2014-2017: Continue to build-out social media presence and engagement, and build educator skill and engagement in social media outreach.

Lamaze International has long provided a LCCE Educator Marketing Toolkit to help educators market their Lamaze classes to their community.  The Social Media Guide augments that Toolkit and is a comprehensive document that explains the different social media platforms so that you can select the one(s) that best meet your needs and serve your purpose.  We then help you get started, if you are new to the selected platform. There is also additional information if you are already a user and want to take your professional social media usage to the next level.

The Social Media Guide shares how it might benefit you and your business to engage with potential clients and students on social media, and what impact it might have on your business.  And as everyone knows, using social media can sometimes feel like falling into a big, black hole.  The Social Media Guide helps you to understand the importance of a) setting limits and b) using your limited time wisely.

Have you wondered if you should have a personal AND professional social media account or use the same account for both purposes?  We can help you decide, as the guide discusses the pros and cons of both.  We also provide various social media graphics that you can incorporate into your profiles, helping you to create a brand identity as a premier childbirth educator.

Each platform section is full of “Pro Tips,” useful suggestions and examples that can help you to use the platform effectively, efficiently and wisely.  There is information for all skill levels from beginner to current user.

There is even a comprehensive glossary so that you can make sure to understand all the abbreviations, acronyms, and keywords that are associated with each platform.

Being active and engaged on social media positions you as an expert in your field and can really help consumers to see both the benefits and value in utilizing your services. It also helps share evidence based information that can help guide families to safer and healthier births.  With a smart and effective social media strategy, you will be able to see the return on your time and energy investments with increasingly full classes and further recognition as an expert in serving families during the childbearing year.

If you are a current Lamaze member, head right over, log in and check out and download your copy of this comprehensive guide. If you are not currently a Lamaze International member, this guide along with all the other benefits offered to members is a real value for the price of a membership.

I also want to share that my colleague Jeanette McCulloch and I are teaching an interactive and jam-packed preconference workshop- “Social Media Smarts: Strategic Online Marketing for the Busy Childbirth Professional” on Thursday afternoon, right before the Lamaze International/ICEA 2015 conference starts, on September 17th, in Las Vegas, NV.

Social media marketing may be free, but your time isn’t. With Facebook views on the decline and increasing competition for your audience’s attention, how can you reach new families and fill your childbirth classes or client calendar without spending your day online? Join us for the workshop and advance your skills!  More info on the conference website.  Early bird registration for the conference and this workshop is available through August 1st.  Register now.

Have you had an opportunity to get a peek at the Lamaze International LCCE Educator Social Media Guide.  Share your experiences putting some of the information to work for you in our comments section.

 

 

Childbirth Education, Conference Schedule, Continuing Education, Lamaze International, Lamaze News , , , ,

Great Line-up of Plenary Conference Speakers and President’s Desk Updates

May 14th, 2015 by avatar

lamaze icea conf 2015Today on Science & Sensibility – news you can use!  Plenary speakers have been announced for the upcoming conference and Robin Elise Weiss, Lamaze International’s Board President has a new series of informative videos called “From the President’s Desk” that you will want to check out.  Read on for information on both of these topics.

Lamaze/ICEA Joint Conference News

Lamaze International and the International Childbirth Education Association (ICEA) just announced their plenary (general session) speaker line up for the joint Lamaze/ICEA 2015 conference at Planet Hollywood, Las Vegas on September 17-20.  Four speakers will address the entire conference in general sessions and I am very much looking forward to listening to their presentations along with the many concurrent sessions that will be offered over the four days of the conference.

ICEA and Lamaze celebrated their 50th anniversaries together in 2010 in Milwaukee, WI with a well attended “mega-conference” that had great energy and educational offerings and I expect that this conference will be just as big and wonderful.  Bringing together two leaders in childbirth education to hold a joint conference means that all attendees will benefit in numerous ways.

The theme of the Las Vegas conference is “Raising the Stakes for Evidence Based Practices & Education in Childbirth” and I know that educators, doctors, midwives, doulas, L&D nurses, IBCLCs and others will come together and take advantage of this joint conference to network, learn, receive contact hours, and socialize with other professionals.  Maybe, even win a little at the blackjack tables or take in a great show.  Las Vegas is a great venue for this conference, offering a wide variety of locales, activities and nightlife to enjoy outside of conference  hours.

This year’s plenary speakers

camman head shot 2015William Camann, MD
Director of Obstetric Anesthesia, Brigham and Women’s Hospital,  Associate Professor of Anesthesia, Harvard Medical School

Presentation: What does the informed childbirth educator need to know about labor pain relief in 2015?

 

 

combellick head shot 2015Joan Combellick, MSN, MPH,CM
PhD Student, NYU College of Nursing
Midwife, Hudson River Healthcare

Presentation: Watchful Waiting Revisited: Birth Experience and the Neonatal Microbiome

 

 

Joseph head shot 2015Jennie Joseph, LM, CPM
Co-Founder and Executive Director
Commonsense Childbirth School of Midwifery

Presentation:The Perinatal Revolution: Reducing Disparities and Saving Lives through Perinatal Education and Support

 

 

mcallister head shot 2015Elan McAllister
Founder, Choices in Childbirth

Presentation: No Day But Today

 

 

 

 

Concurrent sessions

Watch the website for soon to be released information on concurrent speakers and their topics.  Concurrent sessions will fall into one of four categories:

  • Evidence-Based Teaching and Practice
  • Using Technology and Innovation to Reach Childbearing and Breastfeeding Women
  • New and Emerging Research in the Field of Childbearing and Breastfeeding
  • Challenges of the Maternal Child Professional

Preconference workshops

Additionally, there will be two preconference workshops available for a small additional fee.  These 4 hour workshops allow you to really immerse yourself in the topic and leave with concrete skills applicable to your work with childbearing families.

  • Movement in Birth (AM)
  • Social Media Smarts: Strategic Online Marketing for the Busy Childbirth Professional (PM)

Early bird registration is open until August 1, 2015, so registering now allows you to save money on the conference fees and make your travel and hotel plans now.  Look for interviews with the plenary speakers over the next few months on Science & Sensibility.

 From the President’s Desk

Board President Robin Elise Weiss, Ph.D, has recently made a series of short and useful videos for Lamaze International on several topics.  The video series is called “From the President’s Desk”. Released to date are several on cesareans;

Robin’s newest video discusses the recently released ACOG committee opinion “Clinical Guidelines and Standardization of Practice to Improve Outcomes“. This video helps both birth professionals and consumers to understand how pushing for the best evidence based care can result in both pregnant people and their babies having improved outcomes.  ACOG wants to be able to offer best practice to those receiving care from its members, and consumers can help by sharing their desire to receive care in line with recommended guidelines.

Head over to Lamaze International’s YouTube Channel to see all the offerings, share the relevant videos with your students and clients and subscribe to the channel so that you don’t miss any of the releases.

2015 Lamaze & ICEA Joint Conference, ACOG, Cesarean Birth, Childbirth Education, Conference Calendar, Conference Schedule, Continuing Education, Lamaze International, Lamaze News , , , , , , , , , , , ,

You Are Invited to Submit an Abstract for the 2015 Lamaze & ICEA Joint Conference

January 20th, 2015 by avatar

Screen Shot 2015-01-19 at 4.24.40 PM

You are invited to submit an abstract for the 2015 Lamaze International – ICEA Joint Conference: Raising the Stakes for Evidence Based Practices & Education in Childbirth.  This fantastic conference is scheduled for September 17 – 20, 2015 at the Planet Hollywood Resort in Las Vegas, NV.  Share your knowledge and expertise with maternal health care professionals from around the globe.

Lamaze International and the International Childbirth Education Association are two of the oldest and most respected childbirth education organizations.  These two childbirth education leaders last came together in 2010 for a groundbreaking mega-conference in Milwaukee, WI. and was attended by many hundreds of educators and other birth professionals.abstract 2015

Here we are five years later, and it is happening again, but will certainly be bigger and better than before.  At this time the joint conference committee is soliciting abstracts to be considered for this year’s conference program. Abstracts are wanted for both concurrent sessions and morning exercise sessions.

This year’s conference objectives are to:

  • Analyze the evidence base for childbearing and breastfeeding practices, education and support.

  • Implement strategies that use technology and innovation to reach and support childbearing and breastfeeding women.

  • Describe new and emerging research that supports normal pregnancy, birth and breastfeeding practices.
  • Address professional challenges in providing support for childbearing families and breastfeeding women.

Abstracts are being solicited that speak to one or more of the following areas:

Evidence-Based Teaching and Practice
Childbearing families face key choices when selecting providers and birth facilities, as well as options during pregnancy, labor, birth, and breastfeeding. By providing evidence-based information, childbearing professionals can empower women to make informed decisions about their care. For this track, we seek presenters who will clarify how to identify the evidence for practices that can improve safety and satisfaction for childbearing.

Using Technology and Innovation to Reach Childbearing and Breastfeeding Women
Pinterest, Instagram, Facebook, Tumblr, FaceTime, Skype, Google Hangouts, Flipped Classrooms, Vine, apps, and blogs. Millennial women are highly connected to social media and widely receive information about childbirth, postpartum, breastfeeding and parenting through social media platforms. How can childbirth professionals connect electronically with new or potential clients and integrate technology into education, support and advocacy? For this track we seek presenters who will present case studies, technology tool demos and best practices, or marketing tips for the independent provider, educator and doula.

New and Emerging Research in the Field of Childbearing and Breastfeeding
For this track we seek presenters who will share new research, practice guidelines and collaborative efforts (published in the last three to five years) that are relevant to childbearing and breastfeeding families and those who serve those families. Topics may range from holistic approaches to perinatal care, nutritional recommendations, effects of stress and toxic environmental exposures on pregnancy, the life course approach to healthy birth, breastfeeding, epigenetics and the intrauterine environment, approaches for women with pregnancy complications, preconception health, VBAC, and other subjects.

Challenges of the Maternal Child Professional
For this track, we seek presentations on professional issues and practice challenges. Topics may range from meeting the needs of a diverse classroom, ethical issues, healthcare reform, insurance reimbursement, meeting cultural needs and more. Presenters will share innovative techniques for supporting and sharing information with pregnant and parenting families and for advocating for the needs of childbearing women in the classroom and in the community.

The deadline for abstract submission is Sunday, February 1, 2015 and I am confident that many of you have expertise, knowledge and skills that will be well received at this gathering of professionals. What a great opportunity for you to present on your passion and for all the birth professionals; childbirth educators, doulas, lactation consultants, midwives, physicians, l&d nurses, counselors, authors and more to learn from YOU! Receive a generous honorarium and conference discount if your abstract is accepted. You will be contacted by March 6th, 2015 about the status of your submission.

In case you are still on the fence about submitting, here are my top ten reasons to speak at the 2015 Lamaze/ICEA conference:

  1. Help fund your way – (honorarium and registration discount)
  2. Build up your resume or CV
  3. Share something interesting or innovative with others
  4. Have fun with a peer by submitting a joint presentation
  5. Provide information about new research that others need to know
  6. Grow your international presence by presenting to a global audience
  7. Contribute to a successful conference
  8. Guarantee your commitment to attend this year’s conference
  9. Meet new people
  10. Have a ton of fun

Please consider sharing your wisdom!  Start working on your conference abstract now.  The Online Abstract Submission Portal is thorough but easy to use. You can find more information on submitting an abstract and access to the the online abstract submission tool here.  See you in Las Vegas, where we all will be “Raising the Stakes for Evidence Based Practices & Education in Childbirth!”  Let us know in the comments section if you are planning to submit!  I look forward to all of your great ideas!

2015 Conference, 2015 Lamaze & ICEA Joint Conference, Childbirth Education, Continuing Education , , ,

Ebola, Fearbola, and the Childbirth Educator

November 6th, 2014 by avatar

By Rebecca Dekker, PhD, RN, APRN

ebola infographic cc cdcMany news outlets and social media venues have been disseminating information on the Ebola virus and the impact on populations both in West Africa as well as the potential impact on developed nations, including the USA.  The expectant families that you work with may have shared concerns for themselves, their children and their unborn baby with you?  How have you responded?  Did you feel like you had the information that you needed to provide them with facts to calm their concerns?  Occaisonal contributor Rebecca Dekker of EvidenceBasedBirth.com takes a look at the facts about the Ebola virus and shares resources and information applicable to pregnant and breastfeeding families that you can share. – Sharon Muza, Community Manager, Science & Sensibility

What’s the childbirth educator got to fear about Ebola? How do you address your students and clients’ fears?

Well, if you live in the U.S. or in any other country other than Africa—right now, there’s really not much to actually fear. That is, if you’re only worried about yourself and your own community.

The truth is, here in the U.S., there are so many more things that are more likely to kill you than Ebola—other infectious diseases such as influenza, motor vehicle accidents, smoking, secondhand smoke exposure, cardiovascular disease, cancer, even radon—an odorless, colorless gas that exists in many of our homes in the Southeast and can cause lung cancer—you name it, and it’s probably more likely to harm you than Ebola.

So why all the fear here in the U.S.? 

Ebola is a rare but deadly disease, and it has been ravaging West Africa. In developed countries, we feel fear because cases of the disease have finally reached our own shores, when in fact we should have paid attention much sooner to what is happening to our brothers and sisters in Liberia, Guinea, and Sierra Leone.

Does all this fear of Ebola do any good?

Personally, I believe that the fact that so much attention has been drawn to Ebola in developed countries may be a good thing. Fear here means that our governments have finally begun to put energy and resources into stopping the epidemic in Africa– not necessarily for humanitarian reasons– but to prevent the spread of this disease to us.

The Ebola epidemic that has affected parts of West Africa has been a fast-moving event that is only just now showing signs of slowing down. Researchers have conclusive evidence that this is the largest, most severe and most complex Ebola epidemic that we have witnessed since Ebola was first discovered nearly 40 years ago. The number of cases and deaths in this epidemic is many times larger than all past Ebola outbreaks combined.

Before the current epidemic, the Ebola virus had mostly been contained to small outbreaks in rural communities. This time, all of the capital cities in in Liberia, Guinea, and Sierra Leone have experienced large outbreaks.

For the first time, Ebola has entered communities like West Point, in Monrovia, Liberia. According to the World Health Organization, “West Point is West Africa’s largest and most notorious slum: more than 70,000 people crowded together on a peninsula, with no running water, sanitation or garbage collection. The number of Ebola deaths in that slum will likely never be known, as bodies have simply been thrown into the two nearby rivers.”

Ebola has been especially hard-hitting on health care workers. Health workers on the front lines are often exposed to very infectious bodily fluids—blood, vomit, and diarrhea. The fact that health care workers can be at high risk for catching and dying from Ebola was first discovered during the very first Ebola outbreaks that took place in Zaire and Sudan in 1978. Fortunately, researchers have found that proper use and training with personal protective equipment can drastically lower health care workers’ chances of catching the virus. It’s probable that the cases we saw in the U.S. among nurses were due to improper training, inadequate protection equipment, or both.

Interestingly, Ebola actually isn’t as contagious as many other infectious diseases. Measles is an airborne disease, and it is highly contagious. Someone with measles can walk through a room, and another person can walk through that same room two hours later and catch the same measles infection. For every one person who has measles and lives among an unvaccinated population, they will—on average—infect 18 more people.

© CDC

© CDC

In contrast, one person with Ebola infects two other people on average, usually people who have had close, prolonged contact with that person. And the research we have on humans so far shows that Ebola is not airborne—although there have been a few primate studies that suggested otherwise (but some researchers think that maybe the monkeys were spitting on each other!)

One reason Ebola has spread so widely in West Africa – in spite of the fact that this virus is relatively hard to catch compared to other infectious diseases—is that the countries affected are extremely poor. Many people lack running water and soap in their homes.

This means that in West Africa, if one family member comes down with Ebola, there’s a good chance that others in the home will become infected, especially if patients bleed and vomit profusely. Families without modern toilets and washing machines have trouble cleaning up after patients who lose control of their bowels and produce huge amounts of diarrhea. Even burying the dead can spread Ebola in these countries, because common burial rites involve washing the dead and preparing the bodies. However, news organizations are reporting that communities have begun adhering to recommendations to refrain from traditional burial practices that expose more people to the disease.

So, it makes sense that we would fear for our fellow humans in West Africa. They are experiencing what can only be described as a humanitarian crisis. What’s even more concerning is that the virus has—at least for now—crippled an already weak health care infrastructure. This has created what the World Health Organization calls, “an emergency within an emergency.” A great example of this is that pregnant women and infants cannot receive emergency care while resources are drained by the Ebola virus epidemic.

So why are some people panicking about Ebola in the U.S., where the chances of an infection are completely remote? How do we make sense of this?

Well, when it comes to understanding how people perceive risk, and why some people are panicking about Ebola in the U.S., it may be helpful to understand some basic scientific principles behind how people perceive risk.

First of all, risk is subjective. And emotions and our mood change how we interpret risk. So facts matter less when emotions take over.

Also, many people also have an inherent lack of trust in scientists and the government– both here in the U.S. and in West Africa. People often believe their own senses and own experiences more than what scientists say. Many people don’t really understand the scientific process, and have doubts about what they hear. They confuse the research evidence on Ebola with the legal system, and they think there is lots of room for reasonable doubt about whether or not Ebola is airborne, for example.

Also, it’s really important to understand that people perceive a higher risk from rare events with really severe outcomes than they do for common outcomes with less severe or delayed outcomes.

[Does this sound familiar? Just take that sentence above and think about the concept of VBAC and repeat Cesarean. Obstetricians perceive a higher risk from rare events with really severe outcomes—such as uterine rupture—than they do for common outcomes with less severe or delayed outcomes—such as serious maternal infections after a planned repeat Cesarean, or placental abnormalities in future pregnancies].

People also tend to worry more over things that we can’t control. We can control our driving, and getting a flu vaccine, and our diet, and cigarette smoking. But we can’t control Ebola, so that scares us more.

So when we bring fear and emotion into the mix, people’s risk perceptions can end up looking like they do for some people in the U.S. right now– paranoia about Ebola.

It is unfortunate that we have overblown fears of contracting Ebola in the U.S., but if we could redirect our thoughts and channel our efforts into containing the outbreak in West Africa, this is where we will make the biggest difference.

So, in summary:

  • Ebola is a rare but deadly viral infection
  • We are currently witnessing the largest Ebola outbreak in history.
  • The chances of any one of us contracting the virus in the U.S. are extremely remote
  • Fear of Ebola will hopefully trigger people in developed countries to reach out to our fellow humans in West Africa and help them fight the virus

Items of interest related to childbirth and breastfeeding

How can we help?

If you’re worried about Ebola, don’t panic but do put your concern into action. Many health and relief organizations in West Africa are in need of resources, and you can help. This blog article has a comprehensive list of charities working in West Africa right now.

Have your clients and students asked you about Ebola?  Have they expressed concern for themselves or their baby?  Have families discussed the fear of entering the hospital to birth, due to their perceived risk of the hospital as being a potential source of exposure to the Ebola virus?  Hopefully after reading this blog post by Rebecca, you can help provide the facts.  You can also direct them to the Evidence Based Birth online class “Ebola, Fearbola: Separating Facts from Paranoia” and the About.com article “Five Things Pregnant Women Need to Know about Ebola” written by Robin E. Weiss. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention also provides a wealth of information that you can access and share with the families you work with. – SM

About Rebecca Dekker

Rebecca Dekker

Rebecca Dekker

Rebecca Dekker, PhD, RN, APRN, is the founder of Evidence Based Birth and teaches pathophysiology at a research university. She has taught continuing education classes on HIV and recently developed an in-depth class on the pathophysiology and epidemiology of Ebola (2 nursing contact hours). To learn about how Ebola is transmitted, prevented, diagnosed, and treated, check out Rebecca’s class on “Ebola or Fearbola? Separating Facts from Paranoia,” here.

Childbirth Education, Continuing Education, Evidence Based Medicine, Guest Posts, Maternal Mortality, Maternity Care, Newborns, Research , , , ,

Tweet with Us! – Share & Experience the 2014 #LamazeDONA Confluence on Twitter

September 11th, 2014 by avatar

 By Robin Elise Weiss, PhDc, MPH, CPH, ICCE-CPE, ICPFE, CLC, CD(DONA), BDT(DONA), LCCE, FACCE

lamaze twitter 2014The 2014 Lamaze International/DONA International Joint Confluence in Kansas City is scheduled to convene in just one week and the excitement is palpable!  Bags are getting packed, presentations finalized and birth professionals of all backgrounds are getting ready to meet old friends and make new ones.  The content and information that will be covered in the plenary  and concurrent sessions will be new and exciting.  Today on Science & Sensibility, Lamaze International’s incoming president, Robin Weiss, a leader on our social media team, shares all the “need to knows” for getting the most out of the conference via Twitter. – Sharon Muza, Science & Sensibility Community Manager

The past few years the idea of using social media in conjunction with the conference has grown. And the 2014 Confluence with Lamaze International and DONA International is no different. Using the hashtag #LamazeDONA, you will be able to find a treasure trove of information about the conference, and even learn from the sessions – even if you aren’t in Kansas City.

If you are new to Twitter, you will simply need to sign up for a free account. This handy guide will help you to get started in five easy steps.  You can search for the #LamazeDONA hashtag.  Using this hashtag helps twitter users sort a specific conversation that is focused on the confluence and just our users.  Simply read and interact with the people who will talk on this search.

You will want to join in the discussion, tweet and retweet your favorite snippets of wisdom from the fabulous speakers.  If you are not attending, you will want to follow the #LamazeDONA hashtag as attendees tweet live from the sessions they are participating in.

Back this year is the fabulous Tweet Up! We are going to try to do two this year. The first is scheduled for Thursday at 4p.m. Meet by the registration desk. @RobinPregnancy and @KKonradLCCE will be there to walk you through a few things if you have questions or just say hello! @KKonradLCCE will also host a simple social Tweet Up, watch #LamazeDONA for specific information to join – all are invited, no personal invitations needed.

We will also have prizes for your participation when you watch the hashtag, including some for those joining in at home, so be sure to watch #LamazeDONA for directions.

A great article on Twitter etiquette for you to review prior to the confluence

You might also want to consider reading Birthswell’s helpful three part series: Twitter 101 for Birth and Breastfeeding Professionals if you are new to this fast moving and captivating social media platform.

Check out Facebook, where it is possible to follow the same hashtag, #LamazeDONA for updates as well.  Many Facebook users use the same hashtag system to share information on that platform.

 People to Follow

@LamazeOnline (Lamaze for parents)

@LamazeAdvocates (Lamaze for educators)

@donaaintl

@RobinPregnancy (Robin Elise Weiss, social media team for Lamaze International and incoming President)

@KKonradLCCE  Kathryn Konrad (preconference and concurrent presenter)

@ShiningLghtPE Deena Blumenfeld (concurrent presenter)

@Gozi18  Ngozi Tibbs  (plenary speaker)

@Christinemorton  (concurrent presenter)

@mariajbrooks Maria Brooks (Lamaze Board Member)

@jeanetteIBCLC Jeanette McCulloch (concurrent presenter)

@doulamatch Kim James (concurrent presenter)

@douladebbie Debbie Young

@mldeck  Michele Deck (plenary speaker)

@pattymbrennan Patty Brennan

@doulasrq Patti Treubert ‏

@babylovemn Veronica Jacobson

@tamarafnp_ibclc &  @storkandcradle Tamara Hawkins (S&S contributor)

@thefamilyway Jeanne Green & Debbie Amis

@gilliland_amy  Amy Gilliland (concurrent presenter)

@yourdoulabag Alice Turner (concurrent presenter)

Are you going to be live tweeting from the confluence?  Share your Twitter handle in the comments section and we can add you to our list.- SM 

About Robin Weiss

robin weiss head shotRobin Elise Weiss,  PhDc, MPH, CPH, ICCE-CPE, ICPFE, CLC, CD(DONA), BDT(DONA), LCCE, FACCE, is a childbirth educator in Louisville, KY. She is also the President-Elect of Lamaze International. You can find her at pregnancy.about.com and robineliseweiss.com

2014 Confluence, 2014 Confluence, Childbirth Education, Confluence 2014, Continuing Education, Guest Posts , , , , , ,

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