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Book Review: Breastfeeding Solutions; Quick Tips for the Most Common Nursing Challenges

May 30th, 2013 by avatar

Breastfeeding Solutions; Quick Tips for the Most Common Nursing Challenges by Nancy Mohrbacher, IBCLC, FILCA is a recently published book, (April 2013) designed  for breastfeeding mothers.  This book is small and lightweight, measuring just 5 x 7 inches, with 202 pages, including appendices, which makes it practically pocket sized and easy to throw in a diaper bag or read while nursing a little one.  There is also an e-book version available as well.

The book is divided in to 7 chapters, and includes a short and concise resource list at the back, along with some brief citations referred to in the book.  The chapters have simple titles such as “Nipple Pain” or “Night Feedings” making it easy to find the information a mother might be looking for.  Each chapter is divided into the typical challenges that mothers might be dealing with under that particular topic.  With a clear, easy to read large font for each section,  the pages are well designed and simple, making it a breeze for a tired and sleep-deprived mother or partner to find exactly what information s/he needs. Occasional, basic, black and white line drawings reinforce the information provided in the text.  The language used throughout the book consists of common terms and is easy to read and understand. I really liked how Nancy reassures the reader with her writing style, that the while the mother or baby may be experiencing some struggles, that things can be fixed and will get better.   In many places throughout, the author lets us know that if things do not improve that the mother should seek out help from an appropriately skilled expert, with her first recommendation being an international board-certified lactation consultant (IBCLC).

Right from the start, Nancy encourages and explains laid back breastfeeding positions for the mother-baby dyad, sharing why these positions makes so much sense for the mother and baby who are just starting to breastfeed.  She even references and provides a link for a short video on this from Suzanne Colson. In several places in the text, Nancy encourages readers to refer to a linked video to reinforce the information provided in the book.

Nancy emphasizes throughout the book that mothers can follow their instincts and will know what to do, but problems can arise and that help is available. She uses some of the same vocabulary that I use when teaching breastfeeding classes, such as “breast sandwich” to help mothers understand getting a deep latch. When discussing weight gain in breastfed babies, Nancy references the WHO exclusively breastfed growth charts as the appropriate guide for how baby is doing.  This is good to know information when a mother will be discussing weight gain with the baby’s provider.

Important information is repeated throughout the book, so a mother who has opened the book to find specific information will not miss key points such as “drained breasts make milk faster, full breasts make milk slower” even if she never turns to the “Milk Supply Issues” chapter.

One of my favorite sections was Nancy’s accurate explanation of breastfeeding norms for the newborn.  Reassurance that cluster feedings, having night and day time mixed up, frequency and length of feedings in the first six weeks really go along way to reassure the new mother that her baby is normal and doing what normal newborns do.  She also shares information about the volume of milk a baby can expect to need as she grows. Every pregnant woman or new mom should read this section, so they don’t wonder if things are normal in their sleep-deprived state.

The old foremilk-hindmilk discussion is squashed as Nancy explains how fat molecules are released from the milk ducts as the feed progresses, but reassures mothers that this is not something to be concerned about.  When a mother feeds on demand and offers both breasts over the course of a day, the baby will be provided with adequate breastmilk that contains everything needed.

There is a great section on going back to work and maintaining supply, along with how to make a pumping session most effective. There are even tips on choosing the right pump for your pumping needs.  I loved the information and drawings included for making sure that your pump has the proper sized phalanges (or nipple tunnels as they are called in the book) for each woman’s nipples, as I frequently see women who have poor fitting phalanges, making pumping so much more uncomfortable.

Nancy shares several different strategies for solving the common problems, so women have many things to try and includes a section for each topic called “If these strategies don’t work” with even *more* information and other things to consider. There are also little sidebars with “Myth and Reality” nuggets scattered throughout the book.  Women are provided with current evidence based information for best breastfeeding practices.

The book closes with a lovely chapter on weaning, sharing ideas on how to decide when the time is right and how to make it easy on both mother and child.  The entire book is non-judgmental, acknowledges that there can be challenges and offers encouragement and information in a non-biased manner and easy to read style that will provide support and answers to the most common concerns facing breastfeeding mothers today.  This book would be a great accompaniment to a breastfeeding class, and lactation consultants,  childbirth educators, doulas, midwives and doctors that work with breastfeeding families will want a few copies to put in their lending libraries for new moms to borrow.

About Nancy Mohrbacher

Nancy Mohrbacher, IBCLC, FILCA, is author of the books for breastfeeding specialists, Breastfeeding Answers Made Simple (BAMS) and its BAMS Pocket Guide Edition.  She is co-author (with Julie Stock) of all three editions of  The Breastfeeding Answer Book, a research-based counseling guide for lactation professionals, which has sold more than 130,000 copies worldwide. She is also co-author (with Kathleen Kendall-Tackett) of the popular book for parents, Breastfeeding Made Simple: Seven Natural Laws for Nursing Mothers.  Nancy has written for many publications and speaks at breastfeeding conferences around the world. Contact Nancy by email: nancymohrbacher@gmail.com

 

 

 

Babies, Book Reviews, Breastfeeding, Childbirth Education, Healthy Birth Practices, Healthy Care Practices, Infant Attachment, Newborns, Parenting an Infant, Uncategorized , , , , , , , , , ,

Free Lamaze Webinar: Childbirth Education – A Collaborative Role for Nurses and Doctors

February 22nd, 2013 by avatar

 

Join us for a Webinar on Thursday, February 28,  from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. EST.  

Lamaze International and OB Consult are collaborating on a joint education initiative to provide evidence-based and complimentary educational services to OB nursing staff and physicians on their role in supporting patient childbirth education and participation, resulting in enhanced physician-patient relationships, engaged mothers, and healthier babies.  This Webcast officially launches this new collaborative initiative.

Childbirth preparation has been an integral part of the birth experience for centuries, in the beginning as experiential learning when births occurred in the home and then in the 50s and 60s as part of a formal curriculum in physician offices, hospitals and the community.

Travel with us through time to see how the trends in childbirth and childbirth education can impact the care that pregnant women and their families experience in the 21st century.

  • Is childbirth education a passing fancy or an integral part of the childbirth experience?
  • How can physicians, nurse midwives and nurses work together to create a safe and satisfying birth experience for all involved?

Learn about evidence-based strategies that you can put into place now and in the future to educate all stakeholders in the experience of birth.

This presentation is open to all OB department staff, including OB-Gyns, OB department managers, OB nurses, lactation consultants, educators, doulas and the rest of the OB team.  This includes YOU!

This presentation features our own Michele Ondeck, RN, MEd, IBCLC, LCCE, FACCE,  Lamaze International President-Elect and Margaret “Peggy” M. DeZinno, BS, RN, LCCE, an OB-Gyn risk management specialist.

This is a great opportunity to learn more about the Lamaze International and OB Consult cooperative venture, and clarify the importance of your role in supporting families and babies as part of the OB team.

Find more information on the Lamaze International Webinar page. Register now by following this link.

For more info, questions about registration or webinar content, please contact OB Consult at 717.399.6658 or ceb@ob-consult.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Space is limited.
Reserve your Webinar seat now at:
https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/245111544

 

Childbirth preparation has been an integral part of the birth experience for centuries, in the beginning as experiential learning when births occurred in the home and then in the 50s and 60s as part of a formal curriculum in physician offices, hospitals and the community.
Travel with us through time to see how the trends in childbirth and childbirth education can impact the care that pregnant women and their families experience in the 21st century.
•     Is childbirth education a passing fancy or an integral part of the childbirth experience?
•     How can physicians, nurse midwives and nurses work together to create a safe and satisfying birth experience for all involved?
Learn about evidence-based strategies that you can put into place now and in the future to educate all
stakeholders in the experience of birth.

 

Title:

Childbirth Education – A Collaborative Role for Nurses and Doctors

Date:

Thursday, February 28, 2013

Time:

12:00 PM – 1:00 PM EST

Babies, Childbirth Education, Continuing Education, Evidence Based Medicine, Lamaze International, Maternal Quality Improvement, Webinars , , , , , , , , , , ,

Celebrate the Holiday Baby!

December 25th, 2012 by avatar

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Holidays are a time when many of us gather with with family and friends, when hearts are open, tables are full, spirits light and oxytocin flows just from being with those we care about and sharing meals and good times. For some families, babies arrive on the holiday to make the day even more special and significant then other years. For health care providers, doctors, nurses, midwives, doulas, birth photographers, lactation consultants and those that work with birthing families, holidays are often times spent away from their own friends and families so they can help women become mothers and see the birth of a family.

I have a clear recollection of being pregnant with my second daughter through the holidays of 2000. Grumpy, crabby, “done” with being pregnant, and very mad that everyone else seemed to be so festive and happy. Hard to make plans for holiday gatherings and meals, unwilling to have people over and not wanting to go elsewhere, I complained my way through each day, surprised like any other fully pregnant 40 weeker, that I would wake up each morning in my bed, “still pregnant.” I agreed to join friends for our traditional sushi rolling party that we did every New Year’s Eve, and pregnant or not, I was going to be rolling and eating sushi. Alas, baby felt like joining the party, and I went into labor New Year’s Eve. A slow labor ramp up seems to be the way my babies come, and I mildly contracted through the night, all New Year’s Day and into that night. As was the case, I seem to go from early labor to transition rather quickly and soon was pushing a baby out into the world in the pre-dawn hours on January 2nd. 01/02/01. Missing 01/01/01 by just a few hours. Missing the tax break and a New Year’s Eve baby by a day. Regardless, a memorable New Year nonetheless for myself and my family.

I sit now waiting for the call to join a client as her birth doula, as other women, clients of mine, tick the hours past the holiday celebrations, very pregnant and wondering if they too, will have a holiday baby.

As a doula for over 10 years, I have attended births on every holiday, my birthday, and my children’s birthdays, as those babies come when they want to, regardless of the plans of those of us on the outside!

I thought I would check in with those women who have given birth on a holiday like July 4th, Valentine’s Day, Christmas, New Year’s, Halloween and others to find out what their experience was like. And also ask those who themselves were born on a holiday, how has it been forever having their birthday associated with a holiday well known by many here in the US.

“I birthed on a holiday!”

Most of the women I spoke to who gave birth on a holiday had gone into labor spontaneously. Several of them had a long labor, for several days, with the baby making their appearance on the holiday. I wondered if they felt that their birth team minded not being with their family on the holiday. Everyone reported that, regardless of home birth or hospital birth, the birth team seemed very present, happy to be there and upbeat about welcoming the new baby. A few hospital birth mothers remarked at how empty and quiet the hospitals were during their births. Discharge seemed to take a bit longer and it was sometimes harder to be seen by a lactation consultant or other specialist. Some babies born on Christmas were given a green and white striped hat instead of the “normal” newborn baby hat after birth.

Many women talk about celebrating their child’s birthday on the original holiday date when the child is young, but as they get older, they have moved the celebration to a day that is not the holiday, so that friends and family are more available to join in the celebration. They shared that others seem “dismayed” that they gave birth on a holiday, expressed regrets for the child’s birth date, as if it was a bad thing.

I recall being at a birth on July 4th, and the baby was born about 30 minutes before the fireworks over the city were to happen.  The midwife and nurses turned off all the lights and we swung the mother’s bed completely toward the wall of windows, and the new family, and staff and I all watched the big fireworks show in silence, baby snuggled at mother’s breast.  I whispered in the baby’s ear later on, “Remember, these fireworks will always be to celebrate *your* special day!”

All the women I spoke to, who birthed on a holiday, made sure to comment and share that they felt it was important to have the baby pick its birth date, and be born when it is ready, even if that is a holiday. They all recognized what Lamaze speaks to when we share information in our Healthy Birth Practice, Let Labor Begin On Its Own.

The women all stated that they wanted to be sure that their child, born on a holiday, would always feel special and have celebrated, and not have their child’s birthday get lost in the shuffle of holiday celebrations.

“I was born on a holiday!”

I spoke with women who themselves were born on a holiday and they shared what it was like to have to share their birthday with a holiday that everyone was celebrating.  The folks who were born on Christmas or New Year’s shared that they frequently felt like their birthday got “overlooked” or “short shrift” in the celebrations of the season.  As a child, they often had to express their frustrations and share that they  needed their families to make their birthdays special, “If I was born in August, would you wrap my birthday gifts in Christmas wrapping?” said one woman.  Gifts often said “Merry Christmas and Happy Birthday.” One woman, born on New Year’s Day remarked; “At least I wasn’t born on Christmas!”

Many women who are born on other holidays, like Halloween or 4th of July, share that it was great fun growing up with that birthday date, and continues to be fun into adulthood.  One woman shared that being born on April Fool’s Day was not fun, and she got pranked a lot with empty boxes wrapped as presents and other jokes.  Not something she has enjoyed, and she shared; “I felt like my birthday was always a joke!”

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“I worked with birthing women on a holiday!”

I also spoke with health care providers, who shared that they enjoyed working on holidays, that facilities were often quiet, and low key, and the birthing families that they work with seemed extra appreciative of their support on the holiday.  They often wear a little something special to make things more festive, a Santa hat, or Halloween headband or an American flag on July 4th.  Sometimes, hospitals put something special on the meal tray, a flower or decorated cookie.  They are glad to be helping in any way they can.

Conclusion

I think that family and friends, and even the public makes a lot of comments to pregnant women who may find themselves likely birthing on a holiday, adding an extra layer of stress for these women, to what can already be a time period raw with emotion at the end of pregnancy. I am glad that these women are treated well by care providers.  None of the women who responded to my small, unscientific survey said that they felt pressure to induce to avoid a holiday birth date.

I think that as educators, we can stress that babies come when they come, and recognize the additional pressures that women may feel to birth or avoid birthing on a holiday date. We can provide tips on coping with holiday celebrations and plans when “very pregnant” and honor the emotions that some of the women may be experiencing.  Reassuring women that their babies know when to be born and helping them to prepare for however things unfold is a gift we can give to our students and clients.

Have you birthed on a holiday?  Were you born on a holiday?  Do you support birthing women and frequently work on a holiday.  Please share your experiences with all the readers in the comments and let us know what your experience was.  Is anyone waiting on a baby now? Do you expect to get called to a birth? Are you working in a hospital?  On call? Finally, a huge thank you to all the professionals who give up their holidays to support the new babies coming into the world.

 

Babies, Childbirth Education, Healthy Birth Practices, Newborns, Science & Sensibility , , , , , , , , ,

Register Now For Free Lamaze Webinar: “Moms, Babies, Milk & the Law: Legal & Ethical Issues When Teaching Breastfeeding”

August 1st, 2012 by avatar

Lamaze International is delighted to be offering a convenient and complimentary breastfeeding webinar for birth professionals on Wednesday, August 15, 2012.  This webinar is being presented by Elizabeth C. Brooks, JD, IBCLC, FILCA.  Ms. Brooks brings the unique perspective of being both a certified lactation consultant and an attorney.

Moms, Babies, Milk and the Law: Legal and Ethical Issues When Teaching Breastfeeding
Date: Wednesday, August 15, 2012
Time:1:00 PM – 2:00 PM EDT

Presented by Elizabeth C. Brooks, JD, IBCLC, FILCA

Liz Brooks, JD, IBCLC, FILCA, is a lawyer (since 1983), private practice lactation consultant (since 1997), and leader in her professional association (since 2005).  She brings to life the connection between lactation consultation and the law.  IBCLCs face a maze of ethical, moral and legal requirements in their day-to-day practice, no matter what the work setting. With plain language and humor, Liz explains how lactation helpers can work ethically and legally. She offers pragmatic tips that can immediately be used in daily practice — to successfully navigate that maze!  To read more about Liz, please check out her website.

This presentation will describe the difference between a legal and an ethical responsibility as a health care provider as well as common ethical considerations when teaching breastfeeding in prenatal and postpartum settings.

This activity has been planned for 1 Lamaze Contact Hour, and one Nursing Contact Hour. Attendees may earn contact hours upon purchase and completion of a quiz.

Don’t hesitate! Reserve your Webinar seat now at:
https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/926390753

Babies, Breastfeeding, Childbirth Education, Continuing Education, Legal Issues, Webinars , , , , , , , , ,