24h-payday

Archive

Posts Tagged ‘Childbirth Education’

Happy 100th Birthday, Elisabeth Bing – Lamaze Co-Founder and Visionary Leader

July 8th, 2014 by avatar

By Dr. Mary Jo Podgurski

“If I have seen further it is by standing on the shoulders of giants.”  Sir Isaac Newton, Letter to Robert Hooke, February 5, 1675

The co-founder of Lamaze International (known first as ASPO/Lamaze), Elisabeth Bing, turns 100 years old today.  Elisabeth was a leader and advocate for mothers, babies and families long before this type of advocacy had a name.  Dr. Mary Jo Podgurski, past president of Lamaze International and long time friend and colleague of Elisabeth’s, shares some thoughts on this forward thinking woman who cared enough to take action, become a leader and then create an organization that has helped millions of families over the years achieve a safe and healthy birth.  We salute you Ms. Bing and thank you deeply! – Sharon Muza, Science & Sensibility Community Manager.

Ms. Bing and babyMs. Bing and babyMs. Bing and babyWhen Elisabeth Bing first encountered childbearing women in the London of her twenties, she was a physical therapist with an assignment that sounds alien in 2014. Postpartum women were confined to bed for 10 days, without the ability to even put their feet on the floor! Physical therapists provided exercise and massage. The creativity, drive and passion Elisabeth demonstrated in the 40s and 50s became the foundation for the Lamaze method of childbirth education that is internationally taught and respected today.

Elisabeth’s memoir, My Life In Birth, details her journey from Nazi Germany to America, and provides insight into her many years of service to pregnant women. Giving birth between the 1930s and 1960s meant a woman had few if any choices about the way her baby was born. Mentally disoriented by “twilight sleep” and strapped down for “delivery” lest the sterile field be disrupted, a childbearing woman then was more a vessel for the baby than an active participant. In time women demanded an active role in the birth of their babies. Elisabeth was on the cutting edge of change. With Marjorie Karmel, author of Thank You, Dr. Lamaze, she was a revolutionary with the vision to see a consumer movement poised to create a very real difference in the way women gave birth. Elisabeth was the catalyst for that movement.

1996

1996

When I first spent a weekend with Elisabeth in her New York apartment, she was entering her eighties but was still teaching childbirth education twice a week. Her studio was perfect. Baby pictures were prominently displayed, childbirth posters lined the walls, and the atmosphere was relaxed, comforting and empowering. When asked, Elisabeth explained that pregnant women’s concerns were unchanged. Yes, she told me, the climate in hospitals had changed. Now Lamaze classes were common but medical interventions like epidurals continued to disrupt normal, natural birth. The obstacles were altered but the need for informed choices was ongoing. Women, Elisabeth said, still needed the truth.

Teaching 1978

Teaching 1978

Elisabeth turns 100 today, July 8, 2014. Consider her amazing reach. I am one small piece of her heritage. I’ve been honored to personally learn from this amazing, dynamic mentor for nearly 25 years. Her book, Six Practical Lessons for an Easier Childbirth, was my bible as I approached my first birth in 1976. That baby, my daughter Amy Podgurski Gough, is also a certified Lamaze childbirth educator. Between the joy of my first birthing experience and the births of Amy’s three babies, I’ve been blessed to teach thousands of women and their partners. Like most childbirth educators, I am deeply in Elisabeth’s debt.

Much has been written about Elisabeth’s contribution to childbirth education. A facet of her personality seldom discussed, however, is her insight surrounding collaboration. Her initial work in co-founding ASPO/Lamaze (now Lamaze International) in 1960 created a not-for-profit organization composed of parents, childbirth educators, health care providers and other health professionals. From the start, she discovered the strength of working with a group of people as opposed to standing alone. During the last keynote presentation Elisabeth presented at a Lamaze International national conference, I listened, mesmerized, as she prophetically discussed the need to talk with “insurance companies” as a way to continue her dream of teaching as many women as possible. Her commitment to excellence, to advocacy, and to childbearing women and their partners remains fierce in spite of the passage of time.

1982 ASPO/Lamaze Conference

1982 ASPO/Lamaze Conference

Elisabeth has been called the “mother of childbirth education” and she deserves that title. Her legacy guides all childbirth educators. When I picture her, I envision a physically tiny women with a spirit so powerful one forgets her stature. I look into her clear, bright eyes and see her pure white hair, pulled back into a pony tail with a blue ribbon. I sit in her kitchen sipping tea and drinking in her intelligence. Her cat purrs at our feet. My daughter Lisa is across the table, equally transfixed. I lean in, anxious to remember every moment of this encounter. She smiles, and her eyes light with purpose. I share my personal plans for starting a teen outreach. Elisabeth listens deeply, then offers advice I still adhere to twenty years later.

Elisabeth is an icon, a woman of vision and our true mother. To me she is a dear, precious friend. On July 8th, I will travel to New York City and enter her kitchen again, cognizant of the immense gift Elisabeth’s life has been to all who care about women, birth, and the future. One cannot measure her full worth; I know her wisdom echoes in the mission of every childbirth educator who follows in her footsteps. Thank you, Elisabeth!

© ospreyobserver.com

© ospreyobserver.com

Science & Sensibility and Lamaze International would like to let Elisabeth Bing know what a great organization she created, and how it has impacted so many.  Please leave some wishes for a happy birthday in our comments section and if you wish, share what Lamaze means to you (as an educator, a birth professional, a mother, a father, or a health care provider).  Lamaze International will make sure that every wish is printed and sent on to Elisabeth for her to enjoy!  That will certainly touch her heart!  Please, leave your wishes, stories and memories below. – SM

About Dr. Mary Jo Podgurski

MARY JO PODGURSKIDr. Mary Jo Podgurski is the Director of The Washington Health System Teen Outreach and President and Founder of the Academy for Adolescent Health, Inc. Her undergraduate education is in nursing and education, her master’s work was in counseling, and her doctorate is in education. She began volunteering with pregnant teens in the 70s and has created numerous youth development and education programs using reality-based, interactive educational techniques that are evidence-based and empower youth.

Dr. Podgurski became interested in child abuse prevention as a way to lower teen pregnancy and authored the book Inside Out: Your Body is Amazing Inside and Out and Belongs Only to You, and runs a body-positive, child-centered, interactive, child abuse prevention program.

Dr. Podgurski has presented over 500 workshops locally, nationally and internationally.  She is proud to be an adjunct faculty member in the Education Department of Washington and Jefferson College where she created and teaches the course: Teaching and Dealing with Sexuality in Schools in 2010.

Dr. Podgurski’s certifications include LCCE and FACCE (Fellow in the College of Childbirth Educators) from Lamaze International as a certification as both a sexuality educator and a sexuality counselor from AASECT (American Association of Sexuality Educators, Counselors and Therapists), certification through Parents as Teachers, and certification as a trainer in the Olweus Bullying Prevention Program. She is a past president of the Lamaze International Board of Directors.

Dr. Podgurski has received numerous awards, including the UPMC Dignity and Respect Champion Award in 2011, the Three Rivers Community Foundation Social Justice Award and the Washington County Children and Youth Champion for Children Award in 2009. She was the 2008 Washington County NAACP Human Rights Award recipient and the 2004 Washington County recipient of the Athena Women of Wisdom Award. She was awarded the 2004 NOAPPP (National Organization on Adolescent Pregnancy, Prevention and Parenting, now Healthy Teen Network) Outstanding Professional Award. In May of 2014 she was inducted into the Washington County Historical Society’s Washington County Hall of Fame for her contributions to the community through education of family planning and adolescent health.

Mary Jo and her partner Richard are the parents of three adult children and are blessed with three grandchildren.

Babies, Childbirth Education, Guest Posts, Lamaze International, Lamaze Method, Lamaze News , , , ,

5 Business Practices of Successful Childbirth Educators

June 26th, 2014 by avatar

by Robin Elise Weiss, PhDc, MPH, LCCE, FACCE

Robin Weiss, childbirth educator and president-elect of Lamaze International shares some very smart business tips for being a successful childbirth educator, regardless of whether you work for a large hospital system or teach independent classes. Check out her advice below and share your own suggestions in our comments section. – Sharon Muza, Community Manager for Science & Sensibility

Being in childbirth education is an amazing profession. As a childbirth educator, we are privileged to be with families as they learn and prepare for one of the most exciting journeys of their lives, that of giving birth. Many childbirth educators began this path as a calling, and have had to stumble through the business aspects. It can be difficult to separate the calling from the business.

The good news is that there are five things that you can do that will greatly improve your business acumen and help you become successful in all facets of your profession.

1) Get educated

A formal education in childbirth prepares you to teach and for your certification examinations. However, other than quick mentions of finding clients and paperwork, there is often little information given towards having a business and running it well. There are many questions that you might have from settling on a business name, incorporating, taxes, license fees, or office space. These are questions that have widely varying answers, but that are very specific to where you live and how you practice. Finding a local resource for education is an imperative. Many groups that are willing to help small business owners, like SCORE. They offer free classes and counseling to help you get started.

2) Have back up

Back up in this case refers to your certifying organization. Having an international organization behind you will open many doors. While a hospital of doctor’s office may not know you, the name of an organization such as Lamaze International is well known. The people that you are applying to work with know of the high standards that Lamaze International sets forward in their educators.
There are also special benefits to being a member of a professional organization. This can include referrals for clients in your area, continuing education, conferences, and other things of professional interest. In addition to these benefits, there is also the satisfaction of being with like-minded people.

3) Give Referrals

Referrals may seem like something that does not fit in this list. But following the old adage of it being better to give than to receive is only partially true. I would amend it to be that when you give, you also receive. Keep a local resource list handy and feel free to give it away to anyone who would like it. Also be quick with personal referrals for those with complementary business practices. Think about lactation consultants, doulas, midwives, and doctors in your area. Be sure to ask the person to whom you give the referral to say that you sent them. This shows others in the area that you appreciate their services. Consider asking for their cards to pass out when asked for referrals.

4) Be present

Attend all of the local functions that you are invited to attend or that you can apply to attend. This can include baby fairs thrown by hospitals, guest speaking for various groups from nursing education to mothers’ groups. Being seen in public and having lots of people get to know you is beneficial. It has two benefits, 1) to get to know others in the community and to give back, and 2) to let people know about your services.

5) Be prepared

You should always be prepared with at least two things: your business cards and your elevator speech. Multiple business cards is a no brainer. Don’t be so thrilled with your cards that you are afraid to give them out. (I did this when I first started!) Give them out like candy. Need to give another mom your number for a play date? The back of your card works as a great white space!
Your elevator speech is a 1-2 minute long summary of what you do. Be prepared so that the next time someone asks you what you do for a living, you can quickly and confidently tell them. You can practice this after writing it out at home if that helps you. Some childbirth educators say that they’ve even made a video to watch themselves give this mini-speech to help make it more natural.

In the end, do not let the business side of your calling be a barrier. There are ways to build this side of your skill set and to be both a great childbirth educator and a great businessperson, with just a few steps.

About Robin Weiss

robin weiss head shotRobin Elise Weiss is a childbirth educator in Louisville, KY. She is also the President-Elect of Lamaze International. You can find her at pregnancy.about.com and robineliseweiss.com

Childbirth Education, Continuing Education, Guest Posts, Lamaze International , , ,

Series: Welcoming All Families – The Need for LGBTQ- Specific Childbirth Classes

June 24th, 2014 by avatar

By Kristin Kali, LM, CPM

© Kendra Quinn

© Kendra Quinn

Today on Science & Sensibility, as part of the occasional series, Welcoming All Families, midwife and educator Kristin Kali, LM, CPM shares information on holding a childbirth class that is designed specifically for LGBTQ families.  Kristin discusses the benefits of holding an LGBTQ class, provides some resources and offers additional information on content designed to meet the specific needs of LGBTQ families.  - Sharon Muza, Community Manager, Science & Sensibility

Take off your childbirth educator hat for a moment, and consider your own personal experience. If you are a member of a culturally marginalized group, (and if you do not identify as a member of a marginalized group – imagine) you know the difference between being in a space where you are welcomed and respected, versus being in a space with others who share a similar cultural experience, who speak a common language, and who have aspects of everyday life in common. In a space that is welcoming yet mixed, you may only discuss things you hold in common with those around you, unless you are willing to teach others around you in order for them to understand you and your experience. But if you are in a position of vulnerability, such as being pregnant, or in a class to prepare you for giving birth, you are not likely to discuss things that the people around you simply do not understand or do not have a context for.

Imagine being a lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender or queer person who is going through pregnancy, with many of the same physiological concerns as any pregnant person, and with many of the same needs and desires, including the desire for a healthy baby, a positive birth experience, and a childbirth class to help assist in attaining that goal. Yet, although you have much in common, if you are in a class of primarily heterosexual couples, or even a class with many different types of families, some of the primary aspects of your experience of bringing this baby into the world and becoming a parent will not be shared.

© Firestone-Kahn 2013

© Firestone-Kahn 2013

Now put your childbirth educator hat back on again. As a childbirth educator, you might be thinking, “Well, there are many unique circumstances that people have when they come to a childbirth class – people may be coming from having dealt with infertility, military wives whose husbands are away at war, women who are giving birth as single moms. We are together to learn about giving birth, so that’s mostly what we talk about when the group comes together.” I invite childbirth educators to imagine any one of those unique scenarios, and envision if the class was full of people who had that scenario in common. How powerful would that be? What might be discussed in the safety of others who truly understand this experience? How might that affect the empowerment, strength and resolve of someone who is preparing for the prospect of giving birth and becoming a parent?

I can tell you, after 9 years of teaching specialized childbirth classes for LGBTQ families, that it is very powerful. When people live in a culture where their relationship may not be honored with the right to marry, when a child is born and a parent is not legally recognized as a parent and they have to prove themselves worthy to a social worker just to gain legal parentage (or perhaps legal parentage is not allowed in their state at all), when they didn’t simply have sex with their partner, rather they used all of their savings and maxed their credit cards just to get the funds for sperm so that they could conceive, it is such a relief to be in a group that has the same common denominator. More than that, it allows for camaraderie, and issues that are unique to families like theirs to be discussed.

In my childbirth classes, the families introduce themselves to each other with the “usual” information, such as name, due date and place of birth. However, before we get started with introductions, I briefly talk about the transformation of self that happens when a person becomes a parent, and as a person’s gender is so central to who they are, of course gender is central to that experience. I invite the introductions to include stating the pronoun that they prefer people to use in reference to them, and also what they plan for their baby to call them – maybe Mom or Dad, but perhaps a different word that more closely matches their gender such as Baba or Dadmom or anything else.

The second thing we do is share conception stories – I’ll bet this is not something discussed in heterosexual or mixed groups! But for the LGBTQ families in my class, the pregnancy experience started way before that little one was growing inside, and sharing these stories candidly establishes normalcy when the situation is not viewed as “the usual way” by society. Furthermore, families may be still be carrying emotional aspects of their conception process in a way that can impact the birth itself, or the partnership during the transition to new parenthood. Sharing conception stories brings me, as the instructor, up to date. It lets me know what happened for each family in the process of getting to this class, and anything important that I need to watch out for or hold space for with each parent-to-be.

Throughout the class, after setting the stage for open discussion and creating such a sense of safety, participants are likely to ask the important questions that they may not otherwise have asked. People feel free to be exactly who they are, not a guarded sense of “how much can I share about myself and not have the other parents look at me weird or be a spectacle”. We cover all the aspects of labor and birth that would be covered in any childbirth class. In fact, my class is based on a popular curriculum. I just bring together LGBTQ families and specifically discuss topics that are unique to this group within the context of the curriculum.

What makes an LGBTQ childbirth ed class so special? I will let the parents speak for themselves by sharing some of the feedback and comments I have received after class:

“There is something wonderfully supportive about being surrounded by other queer families. It created a truly safe and inclusive space where our LGBT experience was at the center, and not just touched on as an aside or an exception to the norm.”

“I am so grateful for this class. Going in as a queer family, not having to translate from everyone else’s ‘normal,’ not needing to explain our family was great.”

“As a gender variant pregnant woman, this class provided support and community that is often lacking in society at large.”

“I needed to voice fears and have time to ask questions in a non-judgmental space.”

“It’s not just about using neutral pronouns and terms (like “birth parent” instead of “mom”). It’s  great to be in a room full of queer folks who understand my experience, so I feel like my queer specific questions are adding to the group’s experience rather than distracting or pulling the class off on a tangent.”

As an educator, it is important to be able to inform people about what to expect, and to be able to hold people as they explore their thoughts and feelings in relation to the class material. While LGBTQ families may have a lot in common, each family is unique. There is a broad range of family structures, conception histories, gender issues, co-parenting strategies, and interpersonal dynamics to explore, all in relation to giving birth and caring for a newborn.

For those who are interested in teaching childbirth classes for LGBTQ families, there are a number of considerations. Are there enough families in your community to support an exclusive class? Even if you are an LGBTQ person, do you have experience working with a variety of LGBTQ people in the process of becoming parents? Are you able to name common birth and postpartum dynamics that come up in lesbian partnerships, for transgender parents, and extended co-parent families?

You can educate yourself by reading books about LGBTQ family- building:

The New Essential Guide to Lesbian Conception, Pregnancy and Birth
And Baby Makes More
Confessions of the Other Mother

Attend an LGBTQ cultural sensitivity training that is specific to birth and family-building:

MAIA Midwifery LGBTQ Cultural Sensitivity Trainings

Check out websites and blogs about LGBTQ parenting:

http://www.mombian.com/
http://www.lesbiandad.net/
http://itsconceivablenow.com/
http://www.milkjunkies.net/

I do not recommend that non-LGBTQ allies teach this specialized class. Instead, enthusiastically refer LGBTQ families to a specialized class if there is one in your area, explaining the value that so many families have found in attending a childbirth class with other queer families. (Read about ways to make your mixed class supportive for LGBTQ families here and a lesbian couple’s CBE class experience  here.)  The sense of safety that is created when a marginalized group gathers exclusively allows something to happen that would not happen in a mixed group. Being in “safe space” provides a sense of common understanding that goes way beyond welcome and acceptance. It allows for dialogue regarding a common lived experience and a shared cultural identity. There is a sense of knowing – not needing to explain the things that to an outsider could be explained, but would not truly be understood without direct, lived experience. Kind of like becoming a parent.

If you are interested in teaching childbirth classes for LGBTQ families in your community, please don’t hesitate to contact me.

Are there educators in your community who teach LGBTQ childbirth classes?  Maybe you are one of those educators?  Do you see the need for such classes in your community?  Share your experiences and observations with our readers on specialized classes such as this. – SM

About Kristin Kali

© Kristin Kali

© Kristin Kali

Kristin Kali, LM CPM is the owner of MAIA Midwifery and Fertility Services, a fertility-focused midwifery practice that provides holistic, individualized care. MAIA serves all families, with specific expertise in serving LGBTQ families, single parents by choice, transgender parents and those conceiving over 40. Fertility consultations, classes and support groups are available in Seattle, Oakland, and online.

Kristin is a Certified Professional Midwife through the North American Registry of Midwives. She is a Licensed Midwife in California and Washington. Kristin is a graduate of Seattle Midwifery School and a member of the Midwives Association of North America, National Association of Certified Professional Midwives, American Society for Reproductive Medicine, Gay and Lesbian Medical Association, California Association of Midwives, and Midwives Association of Washington State.

Childbirth Education, Guest Posts, Parenting an Infant, Series: Welcoming All Families , , , ,

Childhood Sexual Abuse as a Risk Factor for Postpartum Depression- Part 2: The Educator’s Role

June 5th, 2014 by avatar
© CC Smoochi: http://flickr.com/photos/smadars/4758708634

© CC Smoochi: http://flickr.com/photos/smadars/4758708634

Kathy Morelli, perinatal mental health expert and S&S contributor is sharing information about the impact of childhood sexual abuse on women during the childbearing year.  Tuesday, in Part 1,  Kathy discussed the brain changes that can occur as a result of such abuse and today, Kathy shares the impact during the childbearing year and the role of the childbirth educator.  - Sharon Muza, Community Manager, Science & Sensibility

How do these underlying biological changes affect a woman during the childbearing year?

Childhood sexual abuse (CSA) and a woman’s subsequent reproductive life, including menstruation, pregnancy, birth and ongoing sexuality, occur at different times, maybe even in different decades, in a woman’s life. Yet, in clinical practice and in the research, these issues are intertwined.

In general, the research indicates that women who experienced childhood sexual abuse have more emotional distress in pregnancy, which directly impacts their physical health, which then impacts their pregnancy and leads to more medical interventions (Lev-Weisel, Daphna- Tekoah, and Hallak, 2009).

The somatic, body-based feelings in pregnancy can be re-triggering to a woman who has deep, non-verbal somatic memories of childhood sexual abuse. It’s important that women receive sensitive reproductive care, both physically and emotionally. An unaccepting attitude from her healthcare providers can trigger deeply held feelings of helplessness, fear, low self-worth and shame and actual flashbacks, symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (Lev-Weisel, Daphna- Tekoah, and Hallak, 2009).

The obvious sexual themes resonate on multiple levels: body-based, emotional and psychological. Yet, there hasn’t been lot of research about how a history of childhood sexual abuse impacts a woman’s mental health during pregnancy and postpartum. However, what research exists, finds that women who suffered from childhood sexual abuse have an elevated risk of postpartum depression (Lev-Weisel, Daphna- Tekoah, and Hallak, 2009).

There are a lot of body-based feelings in pregnancy that could be re-triggering to a woman who has deep, non-verbal somatic memories of childhood sexual abuse, even if she is being treated with respect and kindness in the present day.

Pregnancy

Prenatally, simple things such as the position of a woman’s body as she lays on her to be checked vaginally can bring back non-verbal emotional memories of past abuse. The baby moving inside her body might cause intense joy, but might also create an underlying, non-verbal uneasiness.

Birth

Childbirth is an intense experience; a time of hormonal, physical and emotional exertion. Due to the pre-existing priming of early trauma memory networks – an intense distressful emotion, a particular scent, or a body position – can trigger flashbacks to earlier traumatic experiences. Feeling powerless, not heard, or disregarded by healthcare providers during childbirth, can activate the symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder. Her present day feelings of powerlessness and fear are amplified by pre-existing traumatic memories (Beck, Driscoll & Watson, 2013).

Remember the disregard by the medical professionals may just be due to the rush of the medical team as they attend professionally to a medical emergency. The medical protocol doesn’t have a person assigned to talking and listening to the mother during the event, so she feels disregarded (Beck, Driscoll & Watson, 2013).

However, even if she is being treated in a kind way, your client’s body positioning or a scent can recollect something from her past trauma. In an uncanny and timeless way, her body and mind remember the past and take her back to feelings of fear and helplessness. She may wordlessly freeze or panic, for what seems to be no present day reason.

Postpartum

Postpartum, there are physical, emotional and psychological factors feeding emotional health. As has been noted over and over again, a pre-existing personal depressive or anxiety disorder (PTSD is in the spectrum of anxiety disorders) will set up the body up for another episode postpartum. Drs. Deborah Sichel and Jeanne Driscoll (2000) say the brain chemistry “remembers” its previous old depressive pathway and finds its way back there. Plus, there’s a major swing in hormonal activity in your body as you adjust from high levels of pregnancy and birth hormones to pre-pregnancy levels. This adjustment is different for all women, depending on whether or not they are breastfeeding and on their individual differences in metabolism and individual sensitivity level to their own hormonal shifts (Sichel and Driscoll, 2000).

For new parents who grew up in an abusive home, there’s the added challenge of the emotional and psychological work required to examine and modify negative repetitive childhood patterns. It’s not an easy task for your client as she evaluates her past behavioral, emotional and psychological patterns and replaces them with new and more positive patterns about family life and parenting. This adds another level of complexity to parenting a newborn, itself a major lifestyle adjustment.

Adjusting to a new lifestyle with an infant and baby care is physically and emotionally challenging. Feelings of frustration emerge as your client adjusts her schedule yet again to accommodate her baby plus the endless touching and carrying may leave her feeling like her body isn’t her own anymore. Breastfeeding may feel triggering to some women if it invokes past experiences.

A Childbirth Educator Can Help

Childbirth educators can play a key role in helping a woman who has survived childhood sexual abuse to proactively manager her experience of pregnancy, birth and postpartum.The good news is that, even with all these challenges, it’s important to realize that your client’s childhood sexual abusive does NOT define her. There are many aspects of the self that compose her constellation of self-definition.

The human mind and body are plastic, so the past isn’t destiny. Remember to factor in the resiliency of human nature. With patience and perseverance, human beings can move beyond survivorship, learn to bloom and move into the “thriving” phase.

However, learning to thrive is not an easy task. There are no “five steps” here! Managing the effects of an abusive childhood is an ongoing, deeply personal experience. It’s honorable life work, and highly individualized. As your client moves along her healing path, she’ll choose what feels right for her.

She can work positively on herself and experience post-traumatic growth. Post-traumatic growth is inner growth through personal development. It’s possible for her to experience this growth arising from her painful experience, with her own inner work.

Below are some positive ideas you may want to keep in mind as you teach your childbirth education curriculum to a diverse set of families. Your raised consciousness will help create an inclusive space for women survivors CSA to enhance her experience of pregnancy, birth and postpartum.

Be sensitive to the emotional aspects of working with someone recovering from CSA.

Help her honor the importance of pregnancy, childbirth and motherhood

  • Encourage women to honor their experience of childbirth as the important developmental life passage it is. CSA survivors may tend to dissociate and dismiss their experiences
  • Encourage women to interview some providers. Have a list of referrals of gynecologists/obstetricians/midwives that you know are open to and sensitive to working with women recovering from CSA
  • Encourage women to give themselves the respect of investigating the hospital or birth center where her provider practices
  • Allow women to have the freedom to have a personally honorable birth experience, in any manner that birth happens
  • Allow women to feel that they are not less of a woman or a mother, however the birth experience happens. Each woman gets to choose her path in childbirth. Not other people or the unseen, but felt, social pressures.
  • People heal individually at their own pace.
  • Don’t pressure women to use her childbirth experience as a healing ritual. Childbirth is a life-changing experience, and each woman gets to choose how to experience this. If she wants to explore the idea of birth as healing, encourage her to be open to many options. But birth is unpredictable, don’t put this out there as the only way to define healing. There are many paths to healing.
  • Help her by doing what you’re best at: demystify childbirth while accepting her choices. Don’t impose your personal agenda about what is right and wrong for her birth experience
  • If she has alot of anxiety about childbirth, honor her by encouraging her to put in the emotional work with a mental health professional. Childbirth education, while important, may not be enough to manage anxiety, depression and post-traumatic stress symptoms. Prenatal fear of childbirth increases the likelihood of postpartum depression.
  • Encourage her to develop a daily, holistic relaxation practice to counteract the effects of stress imbalance

Discuss postpartum planning in your curriculum

  • Have a babymoon/postpartum plan in place
  • Encourage women to practice self-love by allowing time to rest
  • Encourage women to gentle with themselves – pregnancy and childbirth puts body and mind through a lot of hormonal changes!
  • Educate her about hormonal changes. Hormonal balance takes at least three months to come back to pre-pregnancy levels. The hormonal adjustments are individualized; it also depends on if the mother is breastfeeding or not.
  • Educate women to protect her fourth trimester, and help her body shift to-wards balance:
    • Rest; develop the mindset of being, not doing
    • Practice good nutrition with whole foods and good supplements
    • Get help: If she can afford it, time with a postpartum doula or a baby nurse will help her achieve balance and rest
    • Don’t underestimate the power of sleep; discuss sleep planning
    • Practice mindfulness and relaxation to counteract the inevitable chal-lenges of caring for a new born and the emotional change of identity in motherhood
  • Complementary care is nurturing, safe touch helps rebalance the body and mind
  • Social support is important. Have resources available. Women who “Tend and Befriend” in real life and online help mothers feel supported, Women and birth circles are important resources.
  • Expect emotional ups and downs
  • De-stigmatize professional help; there’s a lot of professional help available. If she feels very sad or anxious, it’s ok to seek help.

As a childbirth professional, you can positively affect your clients and their families. Know that childhood sexual abuse,  though prevalent, doesn’t define people, they can work through it to experience positive personal growth, through resilience and post-traumatic growth.

References

Beck, C. Driscoll, J., and S. Watson (2013). Traumatic childbirth. New York: Routledge Press.

Lev-Weisel, R., Daphna- Tekoah, S., Hallak, M. (2009). Childhood sexual abuse as a predictor of birth-related posttraumatic stress and postpartum posttraumatic stress. Child Abuse and Neglect, 33, 877-887.
Perez-Fuentes, G., Olfson, M., Villegas, L., Morcillo, C., Wang, S. & Blanco, C., (2013). Prevalence and correlates of child sexual abuse: a national study. Comprehensive Psychiatry, 5(1), 16-27. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22854279

Plaza, A., Garcia-Estave, L., Ascaso, C., Navarro, P, et al. (2010). Childhood sex-ual abuse and hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis in postpartum major depression. Journal of Affective Disorders, 122, 159-163.

Sichel, D. & Driscoll, J. (2000).Women’s Moods. New York: Harper Paperbacka.

Yampolsky, L., Lev-Wiesel, R., & Ben-Zion, I. Z. (2010). Child sexual abuse: is it a risk factor for pregnancy?. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 66(9), 2025-2037. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2648.2010.05387.x

Childbirth Education, Depression, Guest Posts, Maternal Mental Health, Perinatal Mood Disorders, Postpartum Depression , , , , , , , ,

Childhood Sexual Abuse as a Risk Factor for Postpartum Depression – Part 1

June 3rd, 2014 by avatar

Childhood sexual abuse can play a key role as a risk factor for postpartum depression.  Kathy Morelli takes a look at the impact of this horrible childhood event on a woman during her childbearing year.  Today, in Part 1 – we learn how the brain actually undergoes changes as a result of the trauma experienced.  On Thursday, Kathy Morelli will discuss how the woman who has experienced childhood sexual abuse (CSA) and what affect that has on her during the childbearing year,(pregnancy, birth and postpartum)  along with information and tips  for what childbirth educators can do.  Join us on Thursday for Childhood Sexual Abuse as a Risk Factor for Postpartum Depression – Part 2. – Sharon Muza, Community Manager, Science & Sensibility.

© CC Michelle Brea: http://flickr.com/photos/itsallaboutmich/451493421

© CC Michelle Brea: http://flickr.com/photos/itsallaboutmich/451493421

Woman to Woman Support

As I’ve said in my previous articles about Perinatal Mental Health, Lamaze childbirth professionals are very often the first point of contact for pregnant and new mothers. You’re an important resource in your community about pregnancy and childbirth, so becoming educated about the signs of perinatal mood/anxiety disorders and having an awareness about the prevalence of childhood sexual abuse (12% -20% of women) is an important aspect of your knowledge base. This article is meant to:

  • Increase awareness about the emotional aspects of surviving childhood sexual abuse (CSA)
  • Present a broad overview about the research regarding CSA
  • Present how CSA impacts a woman holistically, over her lifespan
  • Present how CSA impacts a woman specifically during childbearing
  • Discuss the complex recovery process from CSA
  • Generate ideas about whom to add to your community resource and referral list
  • Encourage being effective and supportive while preserving your own personal, certification and/or licensure boundaries

Remember, you may be the first person with whom she feels safe enough to discuss her personal history, even before her healthcare provider and sometimes even before her family. You can help out by being positively aware, being appropriately supportive and providing a list of contacts in the community and online.

Holistic View of a Woman’s Emotional History

Whenever a woman comes into my office for help for feelings of emotional and somatic distress during her pregnancy, childbirth experience and postpartum, I look at her life holistically, across her lifespan. I don’t assume, but I wonder, if she might be in that estimated 12% – 20% of women who have been sexually abused in their lifetime.

Is there a likelihood that past abuse affects how a woman feels about herself during pregnancy and childbirth and can be an underlying causative factor for antenatal depression or anxiety?

The research literature about the link between a woman’s past childhood sexual abuse and distress during pregnancy is scarce, but emergent research does show a connection.

How does a history of childhood sexual abuse (CSA) intersect with postpartum depression? This is a complicated question, but I’ll try to list some influential factors.

The HPA Axis is Modified: Fear and panic of CSA alters internal stress response

In general, research shows us that people who suffered from childhood sexual abuse (CSA) have a higher incidence of emotional, psychological and social distress, in addition to post-traumatic and physical, or somatic, symptoms. Specifically, research shows us that adult survivors of CSA suffer from higher rates of diabetes and cardiovascular symptoms (Plaza et al, 2010).

Women who have suffered past childhood sexual abuse suffer more unexplained gynecological symptoms, such as recurrent pelvic pain and more painful periods and sexual dysfunction than women who don’t have a traumatic sexual history (Lev-Weisel, Daphna- Tekoah, and Hallak, 2009). The stress and fear from childhood abuse manifests later on in adult life on all levels: body, mind and spirit.

What are some of the physical processes underlying this distress on the body and mind levels?

Researchers believe that long-term negative emotions, such as fear, panic and pain, cause an over-activation of the neural pathways in the brain associated with these strong emotions. The internal production of neurotransmitters, which affect mood, is affected. So chronic emotional stress impacts brain health.

The brain communicates with the pituitary and adrenal glands via the feedback loop called the Hypothalamus-Pituitary-Adrenal Cortex Axis (HPA Axis). The pituitary and adrenal glands are responsible for hormone production, which, in turn, affects the brain and our emotional state (Plaza et al, 2010).

During long-term childhood sexual abuse, the HPA Axis is continually activated and, with overactivation, the stress response becomes chronic, persisting throughout a lifetime. Thus, the chronic over-activation of the fear and pain response underlies anxiety disorders and chronic pain syndromes across the lifespan (Plaza et al, 2010).

During pregnancy and postpartum, hormonal changes are very dramatic, so there’s an additional adjustment for the mind and body to cope with. Thus, the hormonal changes during pregnancy also impact brain health via the pituitary and adrenal glands feedback loop.

Brain Development is Modified: Fear and panic of CSA can inhibit encoding of memories

Research shows that chronic fear and stress in childhood can actually inhibit the growth of some brain structures. In fact, some parts of the brain, such as the hippocampus, which is in charge of memory, are smaller in CSA survivors than people who were not abused in childhood. So, recollection of childhood memories is impaired.

In addition, brain imaging shows brain development is hindered in that there are less robust connections between the emotional part of the brain and the upper part of the brain (Plaza et al, 2010).

How do these underlying biological changes affect a person’s emotional health?

Survivors of childhood sexual abuse survivors are known to suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder, which has a constellation of symptoms on many levels: depression, anxiety, panic attacks, somatic pain, flashbacks and dissociative episodes.

Events that occured long ago in a woman’s life can still play a large role in her mental and physical health when she is pregnant, birthing and in the postpartum period. Join us on Thursday for Childhood Sexual Abuse as a Risk Factor for Postpartum Depression- Part 2: The Childbirth Educator’s Role.- SM

References

Beck, C. Driscoll, J., and S. Watson (2013). Traumatic childbirth. New York: Routledge Press.

Lev-Weisel, R., Daphna- Tekoah, S., Hallak, M. (2009). Childhood sexual abuse as a predictor of birth-related posttraumatic stress and postpartum posttraumatic stress. Child Abuse and Neglect, 33, 877-887.
Perez-Fuentes, G., Olfson, M., Villegas, L., Morcillo, C., Wang, S. & Blanco, C., (2013). Prevalence and correlates of child sexual abuse: a national study. Comprehensive Psychiatry, 5(1), 16-27. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22854279

Plaza, A., Garcia-Estave, L., Ascaso, C., Navarro, P, et al. (2010). Childhood sex-ual abuse and hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis in postpartum major depression. Journal of Affective Disorders, 122, 159-163.

Sichel, D. & Driscoll, J. (2000).Women’s Moods. New York: Harper Paperbacka.

Yampolsky, L., Lev-Wiesel, R., & Ben-Zion, I. Z. (2010). Child sexual abuse: is it a risk factor for pregnancy?. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 66(9), 2025-2037. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2648.2010.05387.x

Childbirth Education, Depression, Guest Posts, Maternal Mental Health, Perinatal Mood Disorders, Postpartum Depression, Uncategorized , , , , , , ,