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Series: Welcoming All Families; Working with Women Pregnant after Infertility

September 9th, 2014 by avatar

Continuing the Science & Sensibility occasional  series: Welcoming All Families, Certified Nurse Midwife Emalee Danforth examines the research on perinatal and postpartum mental health on the family who arrives in your classroom or office with a history of infertility.  As the childbirth educator, you (and the rest of the class) most likely will not be aware of the families with this specific history, unless the family chooses to share privately or in the class group.  The educator needs to understand and recognize the increased risk of perinatal and postpartum mood disorders these families face.  Childbirth educators should evaluate their language and stories to be sure that they are providing sensitive and appropriate language and examples that welcome and apply to those whose path to parenthood might not be the same as other families in your class. – Sharon Muza, Community Manager, Science & Sensibility.

By Emalee Danforth, CNM

© Wikipedia

© Wikipedia

Infertility, defined as the inability to conceive after 12 months of timed intercourse or donor insemination (Practice Committee for the American Society of Reproductive Medicine, 2013), is a common experience. While estimates range, approximately 6-15% of the United States population will experience infertility (Chandra, Copen & Stephen, 2013) with higher rates possible when viewed from the global perspective (Mascarenhas, Flaxman, Boerma, Vanderpoel & Stevens, 2012).

The majority of research on the experience of pregnancy and parenting following infertility examines only those who have conceived using IVF (in vitro fertilization, also referred to as ART, assisted reproductive technology). This group of patients is easy to identify and therefore study, but represents only a portion of those who have experienced infertility. Additionally, study designs have often excluded those with multiple gestations, those with same sex partners, and those who have utilized donor gametes. In everyday life, all of these types of clients will cross the path of a care provider or childbirth educator and each has a unique experience. The available research can outline some of the known characteristics of persons who have conceived via IVF after infertility but caution should be applied to generalizations.

The Psychology of Pregnancy after Infertility

There is a particular psychology of infertility that can transfer to pregnancy, childbirth and postpartum. The emotional hallmark of infertility is anxiety (Bell, 2013). Once pregnant, this worry does tend to persist through the pregnancy and heighten as the due date approaches. The level of general anxiety appears similar to those who have conceived spontaneously, but pregnancy-focused anxieties are heightened in previously infertile women, especially those who experienced prolonged treatment failure and high infertility-related distress (Hammarberg, Fisher & Wynter, 2008). McMahon et al. (2011) points out that “the relatively low correlation between pregnancy-focused anxiety and state anxiety…confirms that pregnancy-focused anxiety needs to be considered as a separate construct from more generalized anxiety” (p. 1394) and that this phenomena may be due to a particular reproductive history rather than individual personality factors.

Infertility is also known to be associated with elevated rates of depression (Cousineau & Domar, 2007). However, evidence is consistent that once pregnant, ART women and men experience lower levels of depressive symptoms than those that have spontaneously conceived (Hammarberg et al., 2008). This may be related to higher rates of psychosocial factors that are protective for perinatal mood disturbance in ART expecting women and men including higher socioeconomic status, higher education, higher quality and longer lasting intimate relationships, being older than average and having a planned conception (Fisher, Hammarberg & Baker, 2008). This same study posits that “it is possible that this low rate of distress is reflecting an almost elated mood, in which the pregnant state and family formation achieved after a long period of anticipation and via intrusive and disruptive interventions are somewhat idealized”(p.1110). Indeed, Hjelmstedt, Widstrom, Wramsby & Collins (2003) found that ART women experienced pregnancy in a less negative way and were also less worried about possible “loss of freedom” in their future lives as parent compared to the spontaneous conception control group.

It is therefore surprising that after birth, ART women experience postpartum depression at similar rates to the rest of the childbearing population (Hammarberg et al., 2008). Fisher et al. (2008) found significantly higher rates of admission for ART women in Australia for postpartum mood disturbances despite their more elevated mental state antepartum. This may be because after a long struggle with infertility and undergoing invasive and costly procedures, ART women feel “a low sense of entitlement to complain or to express any doubts, uncertainty, or mixed feelings about the realities of motherhood (Fisher et al., 2008, p. 1111).” However, once the baby or babies are born, ART women must adjust to motherhood and cope with the demands of a newborn just as any other mother. The combination of idealization of motherhood and lack of preparation for the experience of ambivalence can cause mental distress postpartum. In addition, the higher frequency of birth complications among ART women including preterm birth, cesarean section, low birth weight and multiple gestation (Hammarberg et al., 2008) all can have an additive effect on the stresses of motherhood.

There is evidence that ART women experience the process of emotional attachment to the fetus differently from those with spontaneous conception. Fisher et al. (2008) found that ART women thought about their fetus as much in early pregnancy as the general population of mothers did in advanced pregnancy. In late pregnancy, ART women had significantly more intense and protective emotional attachments to the fetus than women who spontaneously conceived. McMahon et al. (2011) found that with age taken into account, there was a strong association between ART conception and more intense maternal-fetal attachment. This is likely the result of extended anticipation of parenthood, investment in the process of conception and intimate awareness of the biology and timing of conception.

© infertile.com

© infertile.com

There remains a dearth of information on the experiences of ART women during childbirth. There exists one recent prospective multicenter study out of Finland on this topic (Poikkeus et al., 2014) which finds that dissatisfaction with childbirth was similar between ART women and controls with singleton pregnancies. The factors that have been previously found to be related to risk for a negative childbirth experience still remained true for both groups: low educational level, inadequate social support, dissatisfaction with her partner or spouse, untreated fear of childbirth and antenatal depression. Also recalled intolerable pain in birth and giving birth by emergency cesarean section increased dissatisfaction with birth. The authors’ conclusion was that dissatisfaction with childbirth was not related to mode of conception but rather lay with the underlying individual psychosocial and obstetric factors of each patient.

Recommendations for Care

While the body of research on the experience of women pregnant after infertility remains emergent, we can use what we know to help guide the most optimal and sensitive care for this population. Firstly, it is important to remember that this group is often invisible, particularly in the childbirth education classroom. The question “how many months did it take you to conceive?” or the unwitting quote from Ina May Gaskin “What got the baby in is what will get the baby out” will land quite differently on the ears of a woman who has gone through ART. In the clinical setting most if not all patients will share their mode of conception, but in the setting of CBE it may be kept private and language usage should be sensitive to this.

The within-group differences in an ART population can also be significant. A woman who needed help getting pregnant due to a very low sperm count in her male partner and conceived on her first round of IVF will likely have a different experience and outlook than a woman who has gone through multiple rounds of failed IVF for unexplained infertility and a miscarriage before having a term pregnancy with an egg donor. Each woman will be having her own unique experience.

The combination of early and intense attachment to the fetus as well as increased levels of pregnancy specific anxiety for ART women points to the need for frequent reassurance and quite possibly increased frequency of care, particularly in the first trimester and prior to quickening. Sensitive care during pregnancy can help transition a client, if appropriate, from a sense of herself as “high risk” and under specialty care to generalist obstetric or “low risk” midwifery care. Bell (2013) suggests that this reassurance will help women “slowly grow to trust in the process which is pregnancy, and … gain a sense of accomplishment and fulfillment as they continue to gestate” (p.51).

Promoting physiologic birth is the goal for all women including ART women. ART women are more likely to have protective social factors such as greater age, income, education and more stable relationships that can help increase satisfaction with childbirth but concurrently more likely to have characteristics such as older age, multiple gestation and preterm birth that lead to higher rates of obstetric intervention, which leads to a decreased satisfaction with childbirth. Working with each client’s individual strengths and limitations will help best prepare her for birth. For many women, feeling like they are active participants in their childbirth care and decision making is critical to their feeling of satisfaction. Involvement in this process may help a client regain a sense of control that may have been eroded during invasive and intensive infertility treatments.

While baby blues and postpartum depression and anxiety should be discussed with every client, understanding more about the psychology of ART women can help guide a practitioner to have a nuanced and sensitive discussion with these clients. A skilled provider or childbirth educator will be able to recognize and honor the joy and gratefulness that an expecting woman or couple feels after conceiving through ART, but also understand that this is likely layered with pregnancy-specific anxiety, a desire to regain some sense of control over one’s body or birth, and a vulnerability to postpartum mood disturbances. Anticipatory counseling including statements such as “some women who give birth after successful IVF treatments are surprised by the many ups and downs of caring for a newborn and may not have anticipated any negative feelings” or “no matter how glad you are to become a mother, it is normal to experience fatigue and feelings of ambivalence.” can help new parents allow their full range of feelings to surface. When mothers feel safe to share their feelings, more prompt identification and treatment of depression and anxiety is possible.

Understanding the prevalence of infertility and its psychological effects can help the childbirth educator, nurse, clinician or other birth professional provide sensitive and optimal care to the often invisible population of women or couples who are pregnant following infertility treatment.

Have you had families with a history of infertility in your childbirth classes?  As clients? What if anything did you do different to be sure to meet the needs of these families?  Can you share how you have handled this in your classroom environment?  Did your families choose to let you know?  Your thoughts and comments are valued in our discussion section below. – SM

References

Bell, K.M. (2013). Supporting childbearing families through infertility. International Journal of Childbirth Education, 28(3), 48-53.

Cousineau, T.M. & Domar, A.D. (2007). Psychological impact of infertility. Best Practice & Research Clinical Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 21(2), 293-308. doi: 10.1016/j.bpobgyn.2006.12.003

Chandra, A., Copen, E.E. & Stephen, E.H (2013). Infertility and impaired fecundity in the United States, 1982-2010: Data from the National Survey of Family Growth. National Health Statistics Report, 67, 1-18.

Fisher, J., Hammarberg, K. & Baker, G.(2008). Antenatal mood and fetal attachment after assisted conception. Fertility and Sterility, 89(5), 1103-1112. doi: 10.1016/j.fertnstert.2007.05.022

Hammarberg, K., Fisher, J. & Wynter, K. (2008). Psychological and social aspects of pregnancy, childbirth and early parenting after assisted conception: A systematic review. Human Reproduction Update, 14(5), 395-414. doi: 10.1093/humupd/dmn030

Hjelmstedt, A., Widstrom, A-M., Wramsby, H. & Collins, A. (2003). Patterns of emotional responses to pregnancy, experience of pregnancy and attitudes to parenthood among IVF couples: A longitudinal study. J Psychosom Obstet Gynecol, 24, 153-162.

Mascarenhas, M.N., Flaxman, S.R., Boerma, T., Vanderpoel, S. & Stevens, G.A. (2012). National, regional, and global trends in infertility prevalence since 1990: A systematic analysis of 277 health surveys. PLOS Medicine, 9(12), 1-12. doi: 10.1371/journal.pmed.1001356

McMahon, C.A., Boivin, J., Gibson, F.L., Hammarberg, K., Wynter, K., Saunders, D. & Fisher, J. (2011). Age at first birth, mode of conception and psychological wellbeing in pregnancy: Findings from the parental age and transition to parenthood Australia (PAPTA) study. Human Reproduction, 25(6), 1389-1398. doi: 10.1093/humrep/der076

Poikkeus, P., Saisto, T., Punamaki, R., Unkila-Kallio, L., Flykt, M., Vilska, S., Repokari, L. … (2014). Birth experience of women conceiving with assisted reproduction: A prospective multicenter study. Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand 2014; doi: 10.1111/aogs.12440
Practice Committee for the American Society of Reproductive Medicine (2013). Definitions of infertility and recurrent pregnancy loss: A committee opinion. Fertility and Sterility, 99(1), 63. doi: 10.1016/j.fertnstert.2012.09.023

Toscano, S.E. & Montgomery R.M. (2009). The lived experience of women pregnant (including preconception) post in vitro fertilization through the lens of virtual communities. Health Care for Women International, 30:11, 1014-1036. doi:10.1080/07399330903159700

About Emalee Danforth

Danforth Emalee head shotEmalee Danforth is a Certified Nurse-Midwife working in Seattle, WA. She practices at University Reproductive Care, the University of Washington’s infertility and reproductive endocrinology clinic. Previously she spent 5 busy years practicing full-scope midwifery in the hospital setting. She holds a BSN from the University of Michigan and an MSN from the University of Washington. She is also a co-facilitator of Maybe Baby, a resource and support group for LGBT persons on the path to parenthood.

Childbirth Education, Guest Posts, Perinatal Mood Disorders, Postpartum Depression, Series: Welcoming All Families , , , , , , ,

Registration Closes September 15th for October’s Lamaze Certification Exam

September 4th, 2014 by avatar

finger rememberRegistration for the October 2014 Lamaze exam will close September 15th 2014.  The Lamaze exam is being held in locations worldwide October 23-25, 2014.  Passing the Lamaze exam is one component for those individuals on the path to Lamaze certification.  Candidates for the exam will have successfully completed all the requirements in one of the three pathways and all that remains is the final step; sitting for and passing the exam.

You may be interested to know that the Lamaze Certification exam is the only childbirth educator exam that is accredited by the National Commission for Certifying Agencies.  Regular contributor Judith Lothian wrote a wonderful piece for Science & Sensibility this past spring, on the science behind the exam and what makes it the gold standard in the world of childbirth education certification.

My exam experience

I remember very clearly taking the Lamaze exam many years ago, when I first became certified.  My local test site at the time happened to be at a local airfield.  When I checked in for the exam I was handed ear plugs along with scrap paper and a pencil.  There was so much air traffic, planes of all sizes, taking off and landing right outside on the runway, vibrating the windows and sometimes the entire building.  I can laugh at it now, and I think I laughed at it then.  I was the only Lamaze registrant and took my exam amongst many flight students.  The “background noise” must have helped, I did well and passed the exam.  I know that test site is no longer in use, so future exam takers won’t face the same situation.

What I do remember about the exam is that 3 hours given for the exam felt like an ample amount of time.  There are 150 multiple choice questions and  I did not feel rushed. I had time to go through all the questions and return to those I was unsure of and then check over all of them one more time.   I felt like it was a fair exam.  A firm exam but very fair.  I recall the questions definitely

The Lamaze study guide is a very helpful tool for preparing for the exam, even for experienced educators.  If you have not yet acquired your study guide yet, you can order it here.  The study guide is available in both English and Spanish. The Lamaze exam is based on 7 competencies

The exam is based on 7 competencies

Competency 1: Promotes the childbearing experience as a normal, natural, and healthy process which profoundly affects women and their families.

Competency 2: Assists women and their families to discover and to use strategies to facilitate normal, natural, and healthy pregnancy, birth, breastfeeding, and early parenting.

Competency 3: Helps women and their families to understand how complications and interventions influence the normal course of pregnancy, birth, breastfeeding and early postpartum.

Competency 4: Provides information and support that encourages attachment between babies and their families.
Competency 5: Assists women and their families to make informed decisions for childbearing.

Competency 6: Acts as an advocate to promote, support, and protect natural, safe and healthy birth.

Competency 7: Designs, teaches, and evaluates a course in Lamaze preparation that increases a woman’s confidence and ability to give birth.

Some tips for studying and taking the exam.

Definitely consider using the study guide.  It can help you with being up to date with current best practices and covers topics in all the competencies.

Consider setting up study groups – either virtually (post in the comments here if you are looking for a study buddy) or locally in your community.  Having the support of others who are going through the same thing can really help make it a fun and enjoyable process.

Get a good night’s rest the night before the exam

Enjoy a nice healthy breakfast with a good source of protein (personally, I need a very robust cup of coffee as well!)  Maybe even take yourself out to your favorite breakfast place for a great meal.

Do something grounding in the hours before the exam.  A yoga session, a massage or a walk or run outside in the fresh air can be just the thing you need to get the jitters out and feel confident.

Remain calm and confident before the start of the exam.  You have studied, you are prepared and you are ready. Some deep breaths and a few shoulder rolls and stretches before you start will have you alert and ready to begin.

Take your time going through the exam.  The three hours allotted should be adequate.  The exam software makes it easy to move around the exam, answer the ones you know and go back to the ones you wanted to wait on.

Check your work one more time thoroughly before you leave the testing site.

Celebrate your success at completing the process and settle in to receive your results in December. Be proud of the work it took to get to this point.  Know that you are going to be an excellent childbirth educator teaching the principles of safe and healthy birth to families in your community.

Conclusion

If you, too, want to become a Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, but have not yet started on the journey, click here to find out how you can become certified.  There are pathways for new educators, experienced educators and midwives/student midwives.  Then hop over to our workshop page and find a workshop near you.

Remember to get your registration in and good luck on the exam.  Looking for that virtual study group – post in our comments section.  Come back after the exam and tell us how you thought it went.  If you have taken the exam before, share some tips and information to help those sitting this fall.

Photo credit: creative commons licensed (BY) flickr photo by The Secret History GRSG: http://flickr.com/photos/rmdemsick/5065345783

 

Childbirth Education, Lamaze International, Lamaze Method , , ,

The Roadmap of Labor: A Framework for Teaching About Normal Labor

September 2nd, 2014 by avatar

By Penny Simkin, PT

Regular contributor, Penny Simkin developed the roadmap of labor as a teaching tool.  Today, Penny shares how she uses the roadmap of labor to help families in her childbirth classes to understand normal labor from a physiological standpoint. She hopes that her students will take away an understanding of comfort and coping mechanisms along with recognizing the emotions a mother might be experiencing and how a partner can help with both the physical and emotional aspects. Penny is one of the Plenary Speakers at the upcoming Lamaze International/DONA International Confluence scheduled for later this month in Kansas City, MO.  Read how Penny, a master childbirth educator, with this handy tool, helps parents understand what to expect  during labor and birth. – Sharon Muza, Community Manager, Science & Sensibility

Introduction

© Sarah Sweetmans

© Sarah Sweetmans

Childbirth educators strive to provide timely, accurate, woman-centered information. We adapt our content and teaching methods to the time allowed, and the variety of learning styles, educational levels and cultural backgrounds of our students. We hope to build trust in the normal birth process, and instill the confidence and competence necessary for parents to meet the challenges of childbirth, and also to communicate effectively with their maternity caregivers.

In this paper I describe a teaching aid, the roadmap of labor, and some ideas to help guide parents through normal childbirth, from early labor to active labor, transition, and the resting, descent and crowning-to-birth phases of the second stage. The discussion of each stage and phase includes what occurs, women’s and partners’ common emotional reactions, and advice on comfort measures and ways to work together to accomplish a safe and satisfying birth.

I do not describe how I teach about routine or indicated interventions, complications, pain medications, or surgical birth. Aside from space limitations, the real reason lies in my firm belief that when expectant parents appreciate the pure unaltered (and elegant!) physiological process of labor, they have more confidence that birth usually goes well, and they may feel reluctant to bypass it (with induction or cesarean) or alter it unnecessarily. Normal labor becomes the clear standard against which to assess the benefits and risks of specific interventions and the circumstances that increase or decrease their desirability.

If I combined the discussion of straightforward labor with complications and common procedures (along with their risks, benefits, and alternatives), parents would have a fragmented and confused perception of childbirth and an almost impossible burden of separating normal from abnormal, and elective from indicated procedures. All these topics must be covered, however, if parents are to participate in their care, whether labor is straightforward or not. Therefore I teach these topics in subsequent classes, using normal birth as the reference point. I also follow this approach in some other writings.1,2

Initiation of labor, the six ways 
to progress and signs of labor

There are some key concepts that childbirth educators can use to raise parents’ awareness and appreciation of events of late pregnancy and normal birth and how they can help the process flow smoothly. Parents need to understand these concepts well, so they can use the roadmap of labor to best advantage, and play a more confident and active role in labor.

For example, before introducing the roadmap, the teacher should inform parents about the hormonally- orchestrated processes in late pregnancy that prepare for birth, breastfeeding, and mutual mother-infant attachment. This is important because teachers face two common challenges: first, parents’ impatience to end the pregnancy due to discomfort, fatigue and eagerness to hold their baby; and second, the possibility of a long, discouraging pre-labor phase.

These challenges make parents more accepting of induction or vulnerable to the belief that there is something wrong. Parents need to understand that labor normally begins only when all of the following occur:

• The fetus is ready to thrive outside the uterus (breathing, suckling, maintaining body temperature, and more).
• The placenta has reached the point where it can no longer sustain the pregnancy.
• The uterus is ready to contract, open and expel the baby.
• The mother is ready to nourish and nurture her baby.

If parents understand that fetal maturity is essential in initiating the chain of events leading to labor, they may be more patient with the discomforts of late pregnancy, and less willing or anxious to induce labor without a medical reason.

The six ways to progress to a 
vaginal birth

Progress before and during labor and birth occurs in many ways, not simply cervical dilation and descent, which is what most people focus on. Labor unfolds gradually and includes six steps, four of which begin weeks before labor and involve the 
cervix. The cervix moves forward, ripens, effaces and then dilates. When parents understand that a long pre- or early labor is accomplishing necessary progress – preparing the cervix to dilate – they are less likely to become anxious or discouraged that nothing seems to be happening. The two other steps involve the fetus: the fetal head repositions during labor by flexing, rotating, and moulding to fit into the pelvis; and lastly, the fetus descends and is born.

Three categories of signs of labor

By placing these in the context of the six ways to progress, parents may be better able to recognize the differences between pre-labor (often called ‘false labor’) and labor.

Possible signs of labor

These include: nesting urge; soft bowel movements; abdominal cramping; and backache that causes restlessness. These may or may not continue to the clearer signs of labor and may be associated with early cervical changes.

Pre-labor signs

The most important of these is the first one:

  • Continuing ‘nonprogressing’ contractions (that is, over time,
the pattern remains the same; they do not become longer, stronger or
closer together)
  • Possible leaking of fluid from the vagina
  • Possible ‘show’ – bloody mucus discharge from the vagina

With these signs, the cervix is probably not dilating significantly, but is likely to be ripening and effacing (steps two and three of the six ways to progress).

Positive signs of labor

The most important of these is the first one:

  • Continuing, progressing contractions, i.e. contractions that become longer, stronger, and closer together (or at least two of those signs). These progressing contractions cause cervical dilation (steps four and five of the six ways to progress), which is the clinical definition of labor.
  • Spontaneous rupture of the membranes (SRM), especially with a gush of fluid. This happens before or at the onset of labor in about 8% of women at term.3 It most often happens late in labor. SRM is only a positive sign of labor 
in conjunction with continuing progressing contractions.

The roadmap of labor

I have created a visual guide to labor progress using the metaphor of a road map. It shows key labor landmarks, and appropriate activities and measures for comfort as labor progresses (see Figure 1).4 Parents can use it during labor as a reminder of where they are in the process and what to do. Teachers can use it as a tool for organized discussion of normal labor progress, and as a backdrop for discussing laboring women’s emotional reactions, and how partners or doulas may assist. Health professionals can use it to help parents identify where they are in labor, adjust their expectations and try appropriate comfort measures.

© Penny Simkin

© Penny Simkin

Normal labor pathway

The roadmap portrays three pathways. The main brick road represents normal labor and shows helpful actions, positions, and comforting techniques to use as labor progresses. The twists and turns in the brick road indicate that normal labor does not progress in a straight line; the large turns between three and five-to-six centimeters and between eight and ten centimeters indicate large emotional adjustments for the laboring woman, and present an opportunity to discuss emotional support and comfort measures for the partner or doula to use. After ten centimeters, the woman’s renewed energy and confidence are represented by the second wind sign. Along with discussion of emotional support and comfort measures, the teacher can offer perspective and practical advice for partners and doulas, to use both when the woman is coping well and when she feels challenged or distressed.

The roadmap provides a clear and effective way to teach about normal labor. It keeps the discussion focused purely on the physiological and psychological processes, without inserting discussions of pros and cons of interventions, complications, or usual policies and hospital practices that alter labor.

Image Source: © Sharon Muza

Image Source: © Sharon Muza

Once parents have a solid understanding of normal labor, the teacher can explain usual care practices and possible options for monitoring maternal and fetal well being during labor. She can also discuss labor variations or complications and treatments with medical (including pain medications), surgical or technological procedures. With this approach, parents are better equipped to discuss risks, benefits and alternatives, because they can distinguish situations and conditions that are more likely to benefit from the intervention from those in which the intervention is optional, unnecessary, or harmful.

Planned and spontaneous rituals

The normal labor road suggests measures to use for distraction, comfort, and progress. Distraction is desirable for as long as it helps. The Relax, Breathe, Focus sign reminds parents to use this pre-planned ritual for dealing with intensifying contractions when distraction is no longer possible. Parents need to rehearse these rituals in childbirth class (i.e. slow breathing, tension release, and constructive mental focus) and use them in early labor. They set the stage for the spontaneous rituals that emerge later in labor (as women enter active labor), when they realise they cannot control the contractions or continue their planned ritual, and give up their attempts to do so, though sometimes after a stressful struggle. Spontaneous rituals replace the planned ones. They are not planned in advance – they are almost instinctual – and almost always involve rhythmic activity through the contractions – breathing, moaning, swaying, stroking, rocking, or even letting rhythmic thoughts or phrases repeat like a mantra.

The three Rs

The spontaneous rituals usually involve the three Rs: relaxation (at least between contractions), rhythm, which is the most important, and ritual, the repetition of the same rhythmic activity for many contractions. In order to give herself over to spontaneous instinctual behavior, the woman needs to feel emotionally safe, uninhibited, accepted unconditionally by partner and staff, and to be mobile in order to find comfort.

The motto ‘Rhythm is everything’ means that if a woman has rhythm during contractions, she is coping, even though she may vocalize and find it difficult. The rhythmic ritual keeps her from feeling totally overwhelmed. The goal is to keep her rhythm during contractions in the first stage. Once in second stage, however, rhythm is no longer the key. The woman becomes alert and her spirits are lifted. An involuntary urge to push usually takes over and guides her behavior.

The role of the partner in labor

The partner helps throughout labor, comforting the mother with food and drink, distraction, massage and pressure, assistance with positioning, and constant companionship. Sometimes a doula also accompanies them, providing continuing guidance, perspective, encouragement, and expertise with hands-on comfort measures, positions, and other techniques gained from her training and experience.2

The role of an effective birth partner includes being in the woman’s rhythm
– focusing on her and matching the rhythm of her vocalizations, breathing or movements – by swaying, stroking, moving hand or head, murmuring softly in her same rhythm. Then, if she has difficulty keeping her rhythm, and tenses, cries out or struggles – as frequently occurs in active labor or transition – her partner helps her get her rhythm back, by asking her to focus her eyes on their face or hand and follow their rhythmic movements. This is the take-charge routine, and is only used if the woman has lost her rhythm, is fearful, or feels she cannot go on. Partners who know about this are less likely to feel helpless, useless or frightened. Simple directions, given firmly, confidently, and kindly (‘look at me,’ or ‘look at my hand’), rhythmic hand or head movements, and ‘rhythm talk’ with each breath (murmuring, ‘Keep your rhythm, stay with me, that’s the way…‘) are immensely effective in helping the woman carry on through demanding contractions. During the second stage, rhythm is no longer important; now the partner encourages her bearing-down efforts and release of her pelvic floor, and also assists her with positions.

The motto “Rhythm is everything” means that if
 a woman has rhythm during contractions, she is coping, even though she may vocalize and find it difficult.

The detour for back pain

A second pathway, a rocky, rough road, represents the more difficult ‘back labor’, which may be more painful, longer, or
more complicated than the normal labor pathway. Fetal malposition is one possible cause. The measures shown for back labor are twofold: reduce the back pain and alter the effects of gravity and pelvic shape to encourage the fetus’s movement into and through the pelvis. It helps a woman endure a prolonged or painful back labor if she and her partner use appropriate comfort measures, and if they know that dilation may be delayed while the baby’s head molds or rotates to fit through, or that changing gravity and pelvic shape may give the extra room that the baby needs to move into an optimal position.

The epidural highway

© J. Wasikowski, provided by Birthtastic

© J. Wasikowski, provided by Birthtastic

This third pathway represents a dramatically different road – smooth, angular, man- made, more comfortable – but it comes with extensive precautions and numerous procedures, monitors, and medications, which are necessary to keep the epidural safe. The woman adopts a passive role while the staff manage labor progress, and monitors the mother’s and fetus’s well being closely. The excellent pain relief and chance to sleep are the usual rewards. Discussion of how to work with an epidural in order to optimize the outcome is beyond the scope of the paper, but the basic principle is: treat the woman with an epidural as much as possible like a woman who does not have one! This essentially means,‘Keep her cool. Keep her moving. Keep her involved in the work of pushing her baby out. And don’t assume that if she has no pain, she has no distress! Do not leave her alone.’

Conclusion

The roadmap of labor provides a useful framework for teachers to explain the psychological and physiological processes of labor, and a variety of activities for comfort and labor progress for women and their partners to use. By focusing on the normal unaltered process, parents learn to separate the norm from the numerous interventions that alter the process, sometimes for the better, sometimes for the worse. The intention is to give them confidence that they can handle normal labor and to participate meaningfully in decision-making when interventions are suggested.

Do you use the roadmap of labor as a teaching tool in your childbirth classes or with your clients?  How do you use it?  I would love to hear the innovative ways that you have found to incorporate this valuable tool in your classes.  Please share with Penny and all of us in the comments section. – SM

References

1. Simkin P. Moving beyond the debate: a holistic approach to understanding and treating effects of neuraxial analgesia. Birth 2012;39(4):327-32.

2. Simkin P. The birth partner: a complete guide
to childbirth for dads, doulas, and all other labor companions. 4th edition Harvard Common Press; 2013.

3. Marowitz A, Jordan R. Midwifery management of prelabor rupture of membranes at term. J Midwifery Womens Health 2007;52(3):199-206.

4. Simkin P. Road map of labor. Childbirth Graphics; 2003. Available from: www.childbirthgraphics. com/index.php/penny-simkin-s-road-map-of- labor-interactive-display.html

About Penny Simkin

penny_simkinPenny Simkin is a physical therapist who has specialized in childbirth education and labor support since 1968. She estimates she has prepared over 11,000 women, couples and siblings for childbirth, and has assisted hundreds of women or couples through childbirth as a doula. She has produced several birth-related films and is the author of many books and articles on birth for both parents and professionals. Her books include The Labor Progress Handbook (2011), with Ruth Ancheta, The Birth Partner (2008), and When Survivors Give Birth: Understanding and Healing the Effects of Early Sexual Abuse of Childbearing Women (2004), with Phyllis Klaus. Penny and her husband have four adult children and eight grandchildren. Penny can be reached through her website.

Copyright © NCT 2014. This article first appeared in NCT’s Perspective journal, edition March 2014.   http://www.nct.org.uk/professional/research

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Breastfeeding & Racial Disparities in Infant Mortality: Celebrating Successes & Overcoming Barriers

August 28th, 2014 by avatar
© mochamanual.com

© mochamanual.com

August has been designated as World Breastfeeding Month, and Science & Sensibility was happy to recognize this with a post earlier this month that included a fun quiz to test your knowledge of current breastfeeding information.  Today, we continue on this topic and celebrate Black Breastfeeding Week 2014 with a post from regular contributor, Kathleen Kendall-Tackett, Ph.D., IBCLC, FAPA sharing information about the increased breastfeeding rates rates among African American women.  Kathleen also discusses some of the areas where improvements can help this rate to continue to increase. 

Celebrating Successes

Many exciting changes occurred in 2013 in the breastfeeding world. One of the best trends was the increase in breastfeeding rates in the African American community. The CDC indicated that increased breastfeeding rate in African American women narrowed the gap in infant mortality rates.  As the CDC noted:

From 2000 to 2008, breastfeeding initiation increased…from 47.4% to 58.9% among blacks. Breastfeeding duration at 6 months increased from…16.9% to 30.1% among blacks. Breastfeeding duration at 12 months increased from… 6.3% to 12.5% among blacks.

Much of this wonderful increase in breastfeeding rates among African Americans has come from efforts within that community. In 2013, we saw the first Black Breastfeeding Week become part of World Breastfeeding Week in the U.S. Programs, such as A More Excellent Way, Reaching Our Sisters Everywhere (ROSE), and Free to Breastfeed, offer peer-counselor programs for African American women.


We can celebrate these successes. But there is still more to do. Although the rates of infant mortality have dropped, African Americans babies are still twice as likely to die. In addition, although rates of breastfeeding have increased among African Americans, they are still lower than they are other ethnic groups.

For each of the 2000–2008 birth years, breastfeeding initiation and duration prevalences were significantly lower among black infants compared with white and Hispanic infants. However, the gap between black and white breastfeeding initiation narrowed from 24.4 percentage points in 2000 to 16.3 percentage points in 2008.

Barriers to Overcome

In order to continue this wonderful upward trend in breastfeeding rates, we need to acknowledge possible barriers to breastfeeding among African American women. Here are a couple I’ve observed. They are not the only ones, surely. But they are ones I’ve consistently encountered. They will not be quick fixes, but they can be overcome if we recognize them and take appropriate action.

1) Pathways for IBCLCs of Color

In their book, Birth Ambassadors: Doulas and the Re-Emergence of Women-Supported Birth in America, Christine Morton and Elayne Clift highlight a problem in the doula world that also has relevance for the lactation world: most doulas (and IBCLCs) are white, middle-class women. And there is a very practical reason for this. This is the only demographic of women that can afford to become doulas (or IBCLCs). The low pay, or lack of job opportunities for IBCLCs who are not also nurses, means that there are limited opportunities for women without other sources of income to be in this profession. Also, as we limit tracks for peer-counselors to become IBCLCs, we also limit the opportunities for women of color to join our field. I recently met a young African American woman who told me that she would love to become an IBCLC, but couldn’t get the contact hours needed to sit for the exam. That’s a shame. (I did refer her to someone I knew could help.)

2) We need to have some dialogue about how we can bring along the next generation of IBCLCs. We need to recognize the structural barriers that make it difficult for young women of color to enter our field. ILCA has started this dialogue and held its first Lactation Summit in July to begin addressing these issues.

These discussions can start with you. Sherry Payne, in her recent webinar, Welcoming African American Women into Your Practice, recommends that professionals who work in communities of color find their replacement from the communities they serve.  Even if you only mentor one woman to become an IBCLC, you can have a tremendous impact in your community. If we all do the same, we can change the face of our field. (Note, here is a wonderful interview with Sherry as she discusses “Fighting Breastfeeding Disparities with Support.”)

3) Bedsharing and Breastfeeding

 This is an issue that I expect will become more heated over the next couple of years. But it is a reality. As we encourage more women to breastfeed, a higher percentage of women will bedshare. As recent studies have repeatedly found, bedsharing increases breastfeeding duration. This is particularly true for exclusive breastfeeding.

Bedsharing is a particular concern when we are talking about breastfeeding in the African American community. Of all ethnic groups studied, bedsharing is most common in African Americans. It is unrealistic to think that we are going to simultaneously increase breastfeeding rates while decreasing bedsharing rates in this community. The likely scenario is that breastfeeding would falter. It’s interesting that another recent CDC report, Public Health Approaches to Reducing U.S. Infant Mortality, talks quite a bit about safe-sleep messaging, with barely a mention of breastfeeding in decreasing infant mortality.  A more constructive approach might be to talk about being safe while bedsharing. But as long as the message is simply “never bedshare,” there is likely to be little progress, and it could potentially become a barrier to breastfeeding.


Reason to Hope

BBW-Logo-AugustDates3Even with these barriers, and others I haven’t listed, Baby-Friendly Hospitals are having a positive effect. When hospitals have Baby-Friendly policies in place, racial disparities in breastfeeding rates seem to disappear. For example, a study of 32 U.S. Baby-Friendly hospitals revealed breastfeeding initiation rates of 83.8% compared to the national average of 69.5%. In-hospital exclusive breastfeeding rates were 78.4% compared with a national rate of 46.3%. Rates were similar even for hospitals with high proportions of black or low-income patients (Merewood, Mehta, Chamberlain, Phillipp, & Bauchner, 2005). This is a very hopeful sign, especially as more hospitals in the U.S. go Baby-Friendly.

http://kcur.org/post/kc-group-fights-breast-feeding-disparities-education-support

In summary, we have made significant strides in reducing the high rates of infant mortality, particularly among African Americans. I am encouraged by the large interest in this topic and the number of different groups working towards this goal. Keep up the good work. I think we are reaching critical mass.

Additional resource: Office of Women’s Health, U.S. Department of Health & Human Services Breastfeeding Campaign for African American families.

References

Merewood, A., Mehta, S. D., Chamberlain, L. B., Phillipp, B. L., & Bauchner, H. (2005). Breastfeeding rates in U.S. Baby-Friendly hospitals: Results of a national survey. Pediatrics, 116(3), 628-634.

Reprinted with permission from Clinical Lactation, Vol. 5-1. http://dx.doi.org/10.1891/2158-0782.5.1.7

About Kathleen Kendall-Tackett

kendall-tackett 2014-smallKathleen Kendall-Tackett, Ph.D., IBCLC, FAPA is a health psychologist, International Board Certified Lactation Consultant and Fellow of the American Psychologial Association in both the divisions of Health and Trauma Psychology. Dr. Kendall-Tackett is President-Elect of the Division of Trauma Psychology, Editor-in-Chief of Clinical Lactation, clinical associate professor of pediatrics at Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, and Owner/Editor-in-Chief of Praeclarus Press, a small press specializing in women’s health. Dr. Kendall-Tackett has authored more than 310 articles or chapters and is the author or editor of 22 books on women’s health, maternal depression, family violence and breastfeeding. Dr. Kendall-Tackett and Dr. Tom Hale received the 2011 John Kennell and Marshall Klaus Award for Research Excellence from DONA International. You can find more from her at Uppity Science Chick

 

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Sleeping Like a Mammal: Nighttime Realities for Childbirth Educators to Share With Parents

August 21st, 2014 by avatar

By, Linda J. Smith, MPH, IBCLC, LCCE, FACCE

In recent days, there has been much press and discussion about a new book written by pediatricians that professes to help parents “train” their new baby to sleep through the night. The scathing criticism of the book by both parents and professionals alike are consistent with what we know about the needs of a newborn baby and their sleep and feeding patterns. Today on Science & Sensibility, Linda Smith, MPH, IBCLC, LCCE, FACCE shares accurate, evidence based information that childbirth educators and other professionals can use to talk to new families about newborns and their sleep and feeding patterns. Linda is one of the authors of La Leche League International‘s newest book; Sweet Sleep: Nighttime and Naptime Strategies for the Breastfeeding Family.

This book written by Smith along with co-authors Diane Wiessinger,  Teresa Pitman and Diana West provides families with information to help the entire family get more sleep and do so safely, while meeting the nutritional and developmental needs of newborns. Preparing families for life with a newborn is one of the challenges we face as educators. The information Linda provides here along with the resources included in this post can help you to be sure that your information is backed by research and appropriate for your new families. – Sharon Muza, Community Manager, Science & Sensibility

How do I address sleep with my childbirth class participants?

261653 ML Algebra1 2007New parents are instantly thrust into the reality of life with a baby. As Dr. Helen Ball writes, “Sleep (or the lack of it) looms large for parents-in-waiting—and it is pointless to pretend that your sleep will not be disrupted by your new bundle of joy. His body clock, which until recently was controlled by your own, is now free-running, and a day-night pattern does not start to emerge until he is around three months old. His stomach is tiny, and he will need frequent feeds all around the clock—he cannot wait eight hours through the night to be fed just because you need to sleep. If you don’t feed him, he will cry. If he’s cold, he will cry. If he hurts, he will cry. If he misses being in close contact with you, he will cry. He doesn’t know that you will come back once you leave his sight. If he feels abandoned, he will cry frantically—it’s his only method to attract attention and bring himself to safety. If he cries frantically, it will take a long time for him to calm down and you will have to help him.”

“The experience of sleep, and of being left alone for sleep, is very different for babies than it is for adults. The more quickly you can understand your baby’s needs—for comfort, food, reassurance, contact, love—the less disruptive nighttime baby care will become, and the less anxious you will feel. Some of the decisions you make early on about nighttime baby care will affect how you manage sleep disruption and cope with your new baby.” Dr. Helen Ball

What is normal sleep?

  • Pregnant women do not sleep in long unbroken stretches, i.e., “all night.” Neither do postpartum mothers – not for many months, regardless of how they feed their babies.1 Breastfeeding mothers get more sleep than formula-feeding mothers; breastfeeding mothers who bedshare get the most sleep of all new mothers.2,3
  • Before birth, babies sleep rather randomly, not necessarily closely synchronized to their mothers’ body clock. After birth, babies sleep in short (1 to 1½ hour) cycles and need to be fed approximately hourly because of their very small stomachs.4 They do not even begin to develop day-night sleep patterns for several months, regardless of how they are fed.5
  • Frequent feeding day and night is normal, essential for the baby, yet is often called ‘inconvenient’ for parents. Let’s face it – all babies are “inconvenient.” Most of us didn’t get pregnant just to make our lives less complicated. Babies need to be touched – a LOT, day and night, and skin-to-skin.6 Touch is nearly as important to babies’ overall development as food.7 Breastfeeding is an easy way to assure plenty of touch; so is safe bedsharing.8 Most breastfeeding mothers nurse their babies to sleep and sleep with their babies at least part of the night.9

LLLI | Safe Sleep 7 Infographic

Safety issues

  • SIDS (Sudden Infant Death Syndrome) and suffocation are two distinct and rare risks to infants in the early months. SIDS is a diagnosis of exclusion: there’s no obvious reason for a baby’s death. Risk factors for SIDS are well- documented, so avoiding these can help parents reduce the already-small risk: (1) smoking;10 baby sleeping prone;11 formula feeding;12 and baby sleeping unattended.13 (details below)
  • Suffocation is a more easily-preventable risk to babies than SIDS. The main risks for suffocation (entrapment) are putting the baby to sleep on a sofa with or without an adult,14 and/or a drunk/drugged adult sleeping with a baby on any surface.15 “Never bedshare” warnings don’t tell tired parents/mothers where they CAN safely feed their babies at night. A new infographic by La Leche League, “Safe Sleep Seven: Smart Steps to Safer Bedsharing,” lists seven steps that vastly reduce the major SIDS and smothering risks.
  • Prenatal smoking is very bad for babies and increases risk of SIDS at least five-fold. Smoking is a significant hazard to babies if the mother smokes during pregnancy, and smoking in the household (and everywhere) continues to be a risk to the baby after the baby is born. Smokers exhale carbon monoxide for many hours after each cigarette,16 and secondhand smoke is harmful to babies.17 Smoking is a well-known risk to adults, too.
  • Every health authority in the world recommends exclusive breastfeeding for the first six months starting in the first hours after giving birth, then continued breastfeeding while adding family foods till the child is at least two years old.18 Formula-fed babies are less arousable from sleep than breastfed babies;19 have more than double the risk of (SIDS);12 and have many other health problems.20 If families need help with breastfeeding, contact WomensHealth.gov or La Leche League International or the federal government Women, Infants and Children program (WIC).
  • Unattended babies (sleeping out of sight and sound of a competent adult) are at higher risk of SIDS and entrapment/smothering accidents. People are better monitors than electronic devices. Babies should always sleep face-up, in a safe container, and within sight and sound of a competent adult for all sleeps, naps and nights – unless they are safely tied on someone’s body or safely in someone’s arms or sleeping next to their sober, nonsmoking, breastfeeding mother on a safe surface. Baby should be lightly clothed (not overheated. One study reported swaddling as an independent risk factor for SIDS. 21).
  • Recommend that parents baby-proof the family bed, even if they think they won’t ever bedshare. Sleep happens, and exhaustion overrules common sense. No thick covers, no toys, no pets, firm clean flat mattress. Most breastfeeding mothers sleep with their babies at least part of the night, and breastfeeding mothers have the lowest rates of SIDS and other sleep-related accidents.12 Accidental bedsharing is riskier than planned bedsharing.22 A side-car attached to the bed can be a good option – baby is close enough for touching and feeding, yet separate enough to avoid rollovers and exhaled breath of smokers. A safe crib for the baby in the bedroom is safer than baby sleeping unattended in another room.
  • Adults should never lie down with a baby on a sofa or in a recliner, even “just for a minute” – the threat of suffocation, entrapment or dropping the baby is high especially when (not if) the adults falls asleep.23 If a sofa or recliner is the only option for sleep, the adult can lean back and tie the baby securely onto their chest with a scarf, shawl or soft carrier so their arms aren’t holding the baby when the adult dozes off.
  • Wearing a baby many hours a day in a soft-tie-on carrier or sling is a great way for everyone to nap, and helps baby’s motor development besides. Baby’s face should be fully visible and her head should be close enough to kiss. This babywearing guide has information on how to safely wear an infant.

The 4 big questions

1. When will the baby sleep through (longer) the night?

Probably not for many months. Welcome to parenthood! (Sorry, biology rules!)

Babies are growing faster in the early months than they ever will, and need food and comfort very often for normal physical, emotional, and psychological development. A famous scientist described the first 9 months of a baby’s “outside” life as the period of “external gestation.24” The best way to get enough sleep is for parents to plan to safely bedshare with their breastfed baby, and take naps with the baby. (see the Safe Sleep Seven and “Sweet Sleep25 for more information.)

Beware of “sleep training” programs, books and advice, which have a long sad history.26 New strong evidence of baby’s biological and emotional needs suggests that babies remain highly stressed even when the parents think sleep training “worked,” with serious long-term negative consequences for the baby. Babies cry because they need to be touched held, fed, rocked, and nurtured, and simply cannot meet their own needs for any of those comforts.

2. When will the mom sleep like she did before she got pregnant?

The research definition of “sleeping through the night” range is inconsistent and arbitrary.27 Parents can make up any definition they want when quizzed about the baby “sleeping through.” A useful (and vague) response: “Of course the baby is a good sleeper.”

3. Will parents ever have sex again?

Beds aren’t the only places where sex can happen.

4. Will parents ever get the baby out of their bed?

Babies who bedshare get their emotional needs met sooner and more fully than those who sleep separately.28 All babies are inconvenient for a while.

Where can parents get more information?

What do you talk about with families in order to prepare them for parenting a newborn? How do you find the balance between providing accurate information and not “frightening” them with the realities of newborn sleep patterns. Have you read this new book? Would you recommend this book to families who are desiring more information about how to provide a safe sleep environment for their breastfeeding newborn? – SM

References

1. Montgomery-Downs HE, Stremler R, Insan SP. Postpartum Sleep in New Mothers and Fathers. Open Sleep Journal. 2013;6(Suppl 1: M11):87-97.
2. Doan T, Gay CL, Kennedy HP, Newman J, Lee KA. Nighttime Breastfeeding Behavior Is Associated with More Nocturnal Sleep among First-Time Mothers at One Month Postpartum. J Clin Sleep Med. 2014;10(3):313-319.
3. Doan T, Gardiner A, Gay CL, Lee KA. Breast-feeding Increases Sleep Duration of New Parents. J Perinat Neonatal Nurs. Jul-Sep 2007;21(3):200-206.
4. Bergman NJ. Neonatal stomach volume and physiology suggest feeding at 1-h intervals. Acta Paediatr. May 10 2013.
5. Rivkees SA. Emergence and influences of circadian rhythmicity in infants. Clin Perinatol. Jun 2004;31(2):217-228, v-vi.
6. Feldman R, Rosenthal Z, Eidelman AI. Maternal-Preterm Skin-to-Skin Contact Enhances Child Physiologic Organization and Cognitive Control Across the First 10 Years of Life. Biol Psychiatry. Jan 1 2014;75(1):56-64.
7. Feldman R, Singer M, Zagoory O. Touch attenuates infants’ physiological reactivity to stress. Dev Sci. Mar 2010;13(2):271-278.
8. Hofer MA. Psychobiological Roots of Early Attachment. Current Directions in Psychological Science. April 1, 2006 2006;15(2):84-88.
9. Ward TC. Reasons for Mother-Infant Bed-Sharing: A Systematic Narrative Synthesis of the Literature and Implications for Future Research. Matern Child Health J. Jul 2 2014.
10. Zhang K, Wang X. Maternal smoking and increased risk of sudden infant death syndrome: a meta-analysis. Leg Med (Tokyo). May 2013;15(3):115-121.
11. Dwyer T, Ponsonby AL. Sudden infant death syndrome and prone sleeping position. Ann Epidemiol. Apr 2009;19(4):245-249.
12. Hauck FR, Thompson JMD, Tanabe KO, Moon RY, Vennemann MM. Breastfeeding and Reduced Risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome: A Meta-analysis. Pediatrics. June 13, 2011 2011.
13. Moon RY, Fu L. Sudden infant death syndrome: an update. Pediatr Rev. Jul 2012;33(7):314-320.
14. Blair PS, Sidebotham P, Evason-Coombe C, Edmonds M, Heckstall-Smith EM, Fleming P. Hazardous cosleeping environments and risk factors amenable to change: case-control study of SIDS in south west England. Bmj. 2009;339:b3666.
15. Ball HL, Moya E, Fairley L, Westman J, Oddie S, Wright J. Bed- and sofa-sharing practices in a UK biethnic population. Pediatrics. Mar 2012;129(3):e673-681.
16. van der Vaart H, Postma DS, Timens W, et al. Acute effects of cigarette smoking on inflammation in healthy intermittent smokers. Respir Res. 2005;6:22.
17. Tong EK, England L, Glantz SA. Changing Conclusions on Secondhand Smoke in a Sudden Infant Death Syndrome Review Funded by the Tobacco Industry. Pediatrics. March 1, 2005 2005;115(3):e356-366.
18. American Academy of Pediatrics. Breastfeeding and the Use of Human Milk. Pediatrics. March 1, 2012 2012;129(3):e827-e841.
19. Mosko S, Richard C, McKenna J. Infant arousals during mother-infant bed sharing: implications for infant sleep and sudden infant death syndrome research. Pediatrics. Nov 1997;100(5):841-849.
20. US Department of Health and Human Services. The Surgeon General’s Call to Action to Support Breastfeeding. Washington, DC: US Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Surgeon General,; 2011.
21. Richardson HL, Walker AM, R SCH. Influence of Swaddling Experience on Spontaneous Arousal Patterns and Autonomic Control in Sleeping Infants. J Pediatr. Mar 12 2010.
22. Volpe LE, Ball HL, McKenna JJ. Nighttime parenting strategies and Sleep-related risks to infants. Social Science & Medicine. 2012(0).
23. Kendall-Tackett K, Cong Z, Hale T. Mother–Infant Sleep Locations and Nighttime Feeding Behavior: U.S. Data from the Survey of Mothers’ Sleep and Fatigue. Clinical Lactation. 2010;1(Fall 2010):27-31.
24. Montagu A. Touching: the Human Significance of the Skin. Third ed. New York: Harper & Row; 1986.
25. La Leche League International, Wiessinger D, West D, Smith LJ, Pittman T. Sweet Sleep: Nighttime and Naptime Strategies for the Breastfeeding Family. New York: Random House – Ballantine Books; 2014.
26. Middlemiss W, Granger DA, Goldberg WA, Nathans L. Asynchrony of mother–infant hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis activity following extinction of infant crying responses induced during the transition to sleep. Early human development. 2012;88(4):227-232.
27. Adams SM, Jones DR, Esmail A, Mitchell EA. What affects the age of first sleeping through the night? J Paediatr Child Health. Mar 2004;40(3):96-101.
28. McKenna JJ, Mosko SS. Sleep and arousal, synchrony and independence, among mothers and infants sleeping apart and together (same bed): an experiment in evolutionary medicine. Acta Paediatr Suppl. Jun 1994;397:94-102.

About Linda J. Smith, MPH, IBCLC, LCCE, FACCE

© Linda J. Smith

© Linda J. Smith

Linda J. Smith, MPH, IBCLC, LCCE, FACCE, is a lactation consultant, childbirth educator, author, and internationally-known consultant on breastfeeding and birthing issues. Linda is ILCA‘s liaison to the World Health Organization’s Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative and consultant to INFACT Canada/IBFAN North America. As a La Leche League Leader and Lamaze-certified Childbirth Educator, she provided education and clinical support to diverse families over 40 years in 9 cities in the USA and Canada. Linda has worked in a 3-hospital system in Texas, a public health agency in Virginia, and served as Breastfeeding coordinator for the Ohio Department of Health. Linda was a founder of IBLCE, founder and past board member of ILCA, and is a delegate to the United States Breastfeeding Committee from the American Breastfeeding Institute. Linda holds a Masters Degree in Public Health and is currently an Adjunct Instructor at the Boonshoft School of Medicine at Wright State University in Dayton, Ohio. She owns the Bright Future Lactation Resource Centre, on the Internet at www.BFLRC.com.

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