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Posts Tagged ‘cesareans’

Test Your Knowledge of Just Released 2012 Birth Data – A Fun Pop Quiz

January 28th, 2014 by avatar
Image: blog.camera.org
Image: blog.camera.org

As childbirth educators and birth professionals who work with expectant families, it is critical that we remain up to date on the newest data and research available on a wide variety of topics.  When we have current information, we are then able to share this information with the families that we work with in relevant ways.  Today, I would like to bring to your attention to the most fundamental, yet comprehensive data available about birth in the United States.  2012 date was released last month by the Center for Health Statistics.  The National Vital Statistics Report “Births: Final Data for 2012” is a gold mine of information for those of you who are interested in the state of births in the USA.

I thought it would be fun to try and present some of the data in the form of a quiz, for Science & Sensibility readers to take just for kicks.  Take the quiz and see how many of the ten questions you get right?  Then follow the link above to the complete report to find out more details and other interesting facts about birth in the USA in 2012. I invite you to share your score in our comments section along with any surprises you discovered when quizzing yourself.  If you want to see how you did compared to all the other folks who took the test, you can register on the quiz site, but it is totally not necessary.  Take it more than once if you like!  You might even use this technique with your students for a fun class activity.

References:

Martin, J. A., Hamilton, B. E., Ventura, S. J., Osterman, M. J., & Mathews, T. J. (2013). Births: final data for 2011. National Vital Statistics Report62(1).

Disclaimer:

This quiz may not work on mobile devices.

Tips for using with the Safari Browser:

  1. Click on the settings menu and then Preferences… (or CTRL+,)
  2. Click on the Security tab at the top
  3. Check “Enable Javascript”
  4. For “Accept cookies” – select “Always”
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The ads placed at the end of this free quiz application are at the discretion of the software developers

Image sources

Q1: Bonnie U. Gruenberg

Q2: http://www.flickr.com/photos/_nezemnaya_/3843726606/

Q3: http://www.flickr.com/people/kioko/

Q4: multiple-sclerosis-research.blogspot.com

Q5: Krista Guenin/Krista Photography

Q6: en.wikipedia.org

Q7: eyeliam

Q8: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Map_of_USA_with_state_names.svg

Q9: en.wikipedia.org

Q10: www.dailymail.co.uk 

Babies, Cesarean Birth, Childbirth Education, Home Birth, Maternity Care, New Research, Newborns , , , , , , , , ,

Lamaze International Releases Valuable Cesarean Infographic For You To Share!

October 10th, 2013 by avatar

Lamaze International has long been a leader in providing resources for both parents and birth professionals that promote safe and healthy birth for women and babies.  Evidence based information, appealing handouts, useful webinars for both parents and professionals, continuing education opportunities and more can all be found within the Lamaze International structure.  In May, 2012, Lamaze International released  (and later went on to be a co-winner for the 2013 Nonprofit PR Award for Digital PR and Marketing) the Push For Your Baby campaign, which encouraged families to “push for better” and “spot the best care,” providing resources to help parents wade through the overabundance of often inaccurate information swimming past them, and make choices that support a healthy pregnancy, a healthy birth and a healthy mother and baby.

Today, as I make my way to New Orleans, to join other professionals at the 2013 Annual Lamaze International Conference, “Let the Good Times Roll for Safe and Healthy Birth,” Lamaze International is pleased to announce the release of a useful and appealing infographic titled “What’s the Deal with Cesareans?” In the USA today, 1 in 3 mothers will give birth by cesarean section.  While, many cesareans are necessary, others are often a result of interventions performed at the end of pregnancy or during labor for no medical reason.  For many families, easy to understand, accurate information is hard to find and they feel pressure to follow their health care provider’s suggestions, even if it is not evidence based or following best practice guidelines.

Families taking Lamaze classes are learning about the Six Healthy Birth Practices, which can help them to avoid unnecessary interventions. Now, Lamaze childbirth educators and others can share (and post in their classrooms) this attractive infographic that highlights the situation of too many unneeded cesareans in our country.  Parents and educators alike can easily see what the risks of cesarean surgery to mother and baby are, and learn how to reduce the likelihood of having a cesarean in the absence of medical need.

In this infographic, women are encouraged to take Lamaze childbirth classes, work with a doula, select a provider with a low rate of cesarean births, advocate for vaginal birth after cesarean and follow the Six Healthy Care Practices, to set themselves up for the best birth possible.  This infographic clearly states the problem of unneeded cesareans, the risks to mother and baby, and provides do-able actions steps.

It is time for women to become the best advocate possible for their birth and their baby.  With this appealing, useful and informative infographic poster, families can and will make better choices and know to seek out additional information and resources.

Educators and other birth professionals, you can find a high resolution infographic to download and print here.

Send your families to the Lamaze International site for parents, to find the infographic and other useful information on cesarean surgery.

For Lamaze members, log in to our professional site to access this infographic and a whole slew of other useful classroom activities, handouts and information sheets.

I am proud to say that I am a Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, and that my organization, Lamaze International, is leading the way in advocating for healthier births for mothers and babies through sources such as the “What’s the Deal with Cesareans?” infographic and other evidence based information and resources.  Thank you Lamaze!

What do you think of this infographic?  How are you going to use it with the families you work with?  Can you think of how you might incorporate this into your childbirth classes or discuss with clients and patients?  Let us know in the comments section, we would love your feedback!  And, see you at the conference!

 

 

Babies, Cesarean Birth, Evidence Based Medicine, Healthy Birth Practices, Healthy Care Practices, informed Consent, Lamaze International, Lamaze International 2013 Annual Conference, Maternal Quality Improvement, Maternity Care, Medical Interventions, Newborns, Patient Advocacy, Push for Your Baby , , , , , , , , ,

Upcoming Free Lamaze International VBAC Webinar for Parents; Monday, September 23rd

September 20th, 2013 by avatar

If you are a birth professional who works with families exploring their VBAC options, then you will want to let them know about this *free* Lamaze International for Parents webinar on this very topic.

Lamaze’s latest webinar will answer some of these pressing questions expecting parents have as they consider VBAC as a viable option for birth. The “Preparing for Vaginal Birth: Pushing Past a Previous Cesarean” webinar will help parents to:

  1. Learn about the latest research findings regarding safety of VBAC
  2. Understand the benefits and risks that come with VBAC
  3. Learn about existing VBAC access issues, and why women have such a hard time finding supportive care providers
  4. Ensure that women have the support they need if they decide VBAC is right for them.

The presenters are Desirre Andrews, CPM, CCCE, CLD, CLE, LCCE and Debbie Petersburg, LCCE, FACCE. Desirre has expertise in the perinatal field as an educator, doula, advocate, trainer, public speaker, blogger and social media enthusiast. She connects with consumers and birth professionals to be encouraged, confident and equipped to positively impact maternal and fetal health on the individual basis and broad spectrum. Debbie currently serves as the Childbirth Educator Training and Resources Chair within the Education Council of Lamaze International. She has been a Trainer for the Duke AHEC Lamaze Seminar program since 2008 helping to facilitate training throughout the southeast as well as Lamaze Annual Conference pre-seminars. She has also taught childbirth education and labor support classes since 1996 at Rex Hospital in Raleigh, North Carolina and serves as the education representative on the hospital’s Patient Satisfaction Committee.

Please share with your clients, students, patients, friends and family who may find this information useful.  They may register here.

To see previously recorded parent webinars available for viewing, click here.

Cesarean Birth, Childbirth Education, Continuing Education, Webinars , , , , , , , ,

Do Cesareans Cause Endometriosis? The Data Accumulate

July 30th, 2013 by avatar

 Today on Science & Sensibility, regular contributor Henci Goer takes a look at a new retrospective study looking at the potential relationship between cesarean birth and endometriosis development in the mother in the years after her surgery.  Did you know that research indicates an increase in endometriosis for those women who have undergone a cesarean delivery?  Henci shares this new study and asks us to continue to look further. – Sharon Muza, Community Manager, Science & Sensibility.

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© Patti Ramos Photography

My very first post in Science & Sensibility back in 2009 was a round-up of case studies and series reporting on the formation of endometriosis—also called “endometrioma” because the cells formed a solid mass—in the cesarean wound. I commented that case studies could serve to draw attention to possible serious complications worthy of further investigation and ended the post with the hope that researchers would take a closer look at this one. Now I have run across a study that does exactly that.  I wanted to share it with you today.

Swedish investigators, Andolf, Thorsell, and Kallen (2010), used a national in-patient data registry linked to a birth registry to identify all women giving birth to their first child between 1986 and 2004. After excluding women who had a diagnosis of endometriosis before their first birth, 709,090 women remained, of whom 3110 were diagnosed with endometriosis and treated in hospitals after their first birth. Investigators tracked women from the date they gave birth to their first child to either the date of the first diagnosis of endometriosis, the date of their 55th birthday, or December 31, 2004, the date on which investigators retrieved the dataset, whichever came first.

Investigators looked both at cesarean-scar endometrioma and general pelvic endometriosis. They postulated that since endometriosis results from uterine lining cells taking hold and growing outside of the uterus, cesarean surgery could disperse these cells throughout the pelvis, not just seed them into the uterine wound.

After accounting for factors that were associated both with endometriosis and cesarean delivery (maternal age at first delivery; BMI; smoking; and years of involuntary childlessness before first delivery), none of which had any appreciable effect, they found that having at least one cesarean nearly doubled the risk of developing endometriosis (hazard ratio: 1.8). This calculated to 1 additional case of endometriosis within 10 years for every 325 women undergoing cesarean surgery. Having multiple cesareans didn’t appear to further increase the risk. Both women with only vaginal births and women with cesareans had new diagnoses of endometriosis, but a graph of the cumulative incidence rates showed that the line angled upward much more steeply as time passed in women with cesareans compared with women with only vaginal births.

The incidence rate of cesarean-scar endometrioma specifically was 1 per 1000 among women having cesareans. This may be considered a minimum since the data registry would not capture women who had cesarean-scar endometrioma but who either never received the correct diagnosis or were never admitted to a hospital for treatment.

The Swedish analysis has added to our knowledge of the relationship between cesarean surgery and endometriosis. It gave us an incidence rate for cesarean-scar endometrioma and showed that cesarean surgery also is associated with increased likelihood of developing generalized pelvic endometriosis of sufficient severity to require in-hospital treatment.  Preventing that primary cesarean can play a critical role in reducing the number of women who will deal with the pain, complications and need for treatment of endometriosis that resulted from their cesarean surgery.  When considering cesarean surgery, women should be told of the excess risk of developing generalized pelvic endometriosis and cesarean-scar endometrioma and their consequent complications (pain, irregular bleeding, infertility) as part of the informed decision-making process.

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Did you know that an increase in endometriosis rates is a possible consequence of cesarean section? Are the women you are teaching and  working with aware of this potential development and what it might mean?  Do you consider this something that you would share in your role as Doula? Childbirth Educator? Midwife? OB?  Let us know in the comments. – SM

References

Andolf, E., Thorsell, M., & Kallen, K. (2010). Cesarean delivery and risk for postoperative adhesions and intestinal obstruction: a nested case-control study of the Swedish Medical Birth Registry. American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology, 203(4), 406 e401-406.

 

Cesarean Birth, Childbirth Education, Guest Posts, informed Consent, Maternity Care, Medical Interventions, New Research, Research, Uncategorized , , , , , , ,

April is Cesarean Awareness Month! Resources for You and Your Classes

April 4th, 2013 by avatar

April is Cesarean Awareness Month (CAM) and that presents a wonderful opportunity to share resources for cesarean prevention and recovery as well as Vaginal Birth after Cesarean (VBAC) support.

I am a co-leader of the Seattle chapter of the International Cesarean Awareness Network (ICAN) and teach classes in Seattle on both VBAC and Cesarean birth. (I call them VBAC YOUR Way and Cesarean YOUR Way)  I thought I might share my favorite resources on this topic and ask you to share with readers what you prefer to share with your students, patients and clients on this topic.

ACOG Committee Opinion on Cesarean Delivery on Maternal Request

ACOG Practice Bulletin on Vaginal Birth after Cesarean Delivery

Birthing Beautiful Ideas; VBAC Scare Tactics – Kristen Oganowski has a great series on scare tactics that women hoping to VBAC might face.  Good balance of heart and science.

Birthing Normally after A Cesarean or Two – Science & Sensibility three part interview with author and childbirth researcher Hélène Vadeboncoeur, done by Kimmelin Hull, former Science & Sensibility Community Manager

Cesareanrates.com - organized by Jill Arnold (of The Unnecessarean), provides a comprehensive breakdown of cesarean rates by state and hospital for the USA.

Childbirth Connection – Vaginal Birth or Repeat C Section: What You Need to Know

Evidence Based Birth – Rebecca Dekker is a Science & Sensibility contributor and writes a great fact based blog.  She frequently writes on the topic of cesareans.

Giving Birth With Confidence’s A Woman’s Guide to VBAC: Navigating the NIH VBAC Recommendations - Lamaze International’s parent blog hosts this wonderful resource written by Amy Romano and Kristen Oganowski

International Cesarean Awareness Network – international organization that works to prevent unneeded cesareans, promote cesarean recover and help women striving for a VBAC. Offers both online support as well as local chapter meetings.

A Natural Cesarean – A Woman Centered Technique. This video demonstrates and discusses ways that health care providers can make the cesarean more mother-baby centric, offering techniques that provide a great degree of satisfaction to the birthing woman.

NIH VBAC Consensus Statement – In 2010,  the National Institute of Health, a US government agency convened experts on VBAC and Cesareans and took testimony and heard discussions about best practice.  They summarized the results of this groundbreaking forum in this document.

The Truth about Cesareans – by Eugene Declercq.  Short 6 minute video on why the cesarean rate might be so high.

 

VBACFacts.com – A blog run by Jen Kamel, this website is a wealth of information and analysis on current studies and data as it relates to cesareans and VBAC birth.  Jen also runs a fabulous VBAC webinar that is available online.

The Well-Rounded Mama – blog run by occasional Science & Sensibility contributor Pamela Vireday, provides frequent information on VBACs, cesareans and large sized women, but the insight is valuable for all.

I am also aware of a free webinar, for birth professionals and providers as well as parents, “Family Centered Cesarean Birth” that you may want to consider signing up for.  Click here for more information. The webinar is presented live on Thursday, April 11th and then available after the presentation to watch as a recording.

What are your favorite go to resources to share with expectant parents?  Do you have a particular film clip that you like to show?  A book recommendation?  Do you have an effective method of presenting information on Cesareans and VBACs in your classes and with your clients and patients.  Let’s have a discussion in the comments section.  I welcome your thoughts.

 

 

ACOG, Cesarean Birth, Childbirth Education, Evidence Based Medicine, Maternal Quality Improvement, Maternity Care, Vaginal Birth After Cesarean (VBAC) , , , , , , ,