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Is Your Favorite in the Top Five? – Science & Sensibility’s Five Most Popular Posts

I have been working as Science & Sensibility’s Community Manager for a few weeks shy of two years.  The past two years have been one of great growth for me personally, as I have stretched myself to explore and more clearly understand research related to maternal infant health. I have “labored” to choose topics that are of interest, current and relevant to our readers. I have deeply enjoyed supporting and collaborating with the many gifted writers who have been kind enough to share their wisdom and their words with all of us. I have welcomed and enjoyed the reader comments and shared discussions with many readers, as they made their opinions, thoughts and viewpoints known.  I have learned along with all of you, as readers asked questions of the blog writers and clarified their understanding of topics.  It has, to put it simply, been a fantastic and fun time.

As I reflected on the past two years , I wondered what have been the most popular posts on the blog, since Amy Romano wrote the first post on Science & Sensibility back in Spring of 2009.  I took a look and found some surprises.  I thought it would be interesting to share the top five posts and ask you, the reader – what posts have been your favorites?  The ones you share with students, clients and patients over and over? The ones you most enjoyed reading?

Top Five Posts on Science & Sensibility

#5. Research Review: Facilitating Autonomous Infant Hand Use During Breastfeeding

© Raphael Goetter

© Raphael Goetter

This post reviewed research by Catherine Watson Genna, BS, IBCLC, RLC and Diklah Barak, BOT that demonstrated that babies use their hands at the breast for many purposes, including stabilizing their neck and head for feeding, causing the nipple to become erect and increasing maternal oxytocin which facilitates delivery of milk to the infant.  The research paper included great photographs and links to videos documenting this behavior.  All the more reason to encourage mothers to unswaddle babies prior to feeding to allow them to do what they do best.

 

 

#4. Help New Mothers Breastfeed in Comfort: Nordstrom Converts Any Bra Into A Nursing Bra for a $10 Fee

Creative Commons Photo: Children's Bureau Centennial.  WPA Project 1938

© Children’s Bureau Centennial. WPA Project 1938

This post shared the little known fact that some Nordstrom stores in the USA would convert a woman’s favorite bra into a nursing bra for a small fee.  Many women find it difficult to find a comfortable nursing bra and are sad to need to stop wearing their favorites.  Now they may not have to.  We heard from lots of readers that not all stores offer this service and the price may vary. Updates would be welcome.

 

 

 

 

#3.  Safe Prevention of the Primary Cesarean Delivery: ACOG and SMFM Change the Game

acog wordlThis recent post by Judy Lothian, Phd, RN, LCCE, FACCE, highlighted the newly released ACOG and SMFM Consensus statement discussing 18 points that these organizations stated would help to reduce the number of primary cesareans being performed.  This statement was groundbreaking in its language, suggestions and proposed modifications to current obstetrical practice, backed up by evidence and certainly in line with much of the research behind Lamaze International’s Six Healthy Birth Practices.

 

#2. What Is the Evidence for Induction for Low Amniotic Fluid in a Healthy Pregnancy?

“It is standard of care in the U.S. to induce women with isolated oligohydramnios at term.” Image Source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/drewesque/2608674753/sizes/l/in/set-72157605814668384/

© drewesque

This post by Rebecca Dekker, Phd, RN, APRN of Evidence Based Birth was a comprehensive research review looking at outcomes of expectant management vs active management of low amniotic fluid in a healthy term pregnancy, as well as the reliability of the most common methods for assessing amniotic fluid volume.  Lots of great information to help women understand the risks and benefits and determine how they would like to proceed if they are faced with this decision at the end of their pregnancy.

 

 

#1 .  The Red/Purple Line: An Alternate Method For Assessing Cervical Dilation Using Visual Cues

marked purple lineThis post, written by Mindy Cockeram, LCCE is the most popular post ever published on Science & Sensibility.  Mindy reviewed and discussed the research on the the red/purple line that may be seen between the butt cheeks/natal cleft and the changes to this line as cervical dilation changes during labor.  This topic was simply fascinating to readers – and shared widely.  Professionals and consumers sent in pictures and discussed in the comments section their own observations.

 

Are you surprised by the top five posts on Science & Sensibility?  Do you have different favorites?  What else would you like to see covered in the future on this blog?  We welcome your input, your comments, suggestions and are interested in your favorite all time posts!  Share your thoughts and suggestions in our comments section below.

Childbirth Education, Healthy Birth Practices, Lamaze International, Science & Sensibility , , ,

  1. avatar
    Ruth
    March 13th, 2014 at 15:59 | #1

    Great work Sharon. :-)
    One of the only blogs I read as soon as it comes into my mail box. I always have a satisfying read because I’m in agreement with you and the blog, or learn something new, or see something I knew from a different perspective!
    I give the link about GBS+ most often and the interview with Rebecca Dekker.

  2. March 13th, 2014 at 21:11 | #2

    Thanks Ruth! The ones I share most often are the Low AFI and Dr. Mark Sloan’s delayed cord clamping one. He does a great job answering all the standard responses that OBs tend to have toward why DCC is NOT possible. But I have many favorites, the Now I Lay Me Down To Sleep photography ones touched me and I really liked the one I wrote about being accused of having a bias toward breastfeeding, on my breastfeeding class evaluation.

  3. avatar
    Mindy Cockeram
    March 14th, 2014 at 08:05 | #3

    S&S has been a consistent learning tool for me and I use #2 (low AF)all the time. I also continue to receive great purple, red and brown line photos which I often use in class (with permission!).

    I have a couple ideas up my sleeve which I’ve been researching…including precipitous labor and what makes involuntary smooth muscles (like the uterus) contract…and how could we make the muscle contract with the least amount of pain. I’ll contact you Sharon! And thanks for doing what you do..it continues to be a great resource and always gets read ; ).

  4. March 14th, 2014 at 17:20 | #4

    Mindy- your idea for a post on the purple/red line was brilliant! very appreciative and looking forward to any other ideas you might want to write about!

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