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You Are Invited to Participate in an Online Learning Opportunity: Patient, Staff, and Family Support Following a Severe Maternal Event

October 10th, 2014 by avatar

council women safety

Past posts on Science & Sensibility – CDC & ACOG Convene Meeting on Maternal Mortality & Maternal Safety in Chicago and U.S. Maternal Mortality Ratio is Dismal, But Changes Underway, and You are Invited to Participate have shared information on the National Partnership for Maternal Safety, a multidisciplinary initiative focused on reducing the rates of maternal morbidity and mortality in the United States.  This partnership falls under the umbrella of The Council on Patient Safety in Women’s Health Care. This unique consortium of organizations across the spectrum of women’s health has come together to promote safe health care for every woman, at every birthing facility in the U.S. through implementation of safety bundles for common obstetric emergencies (hemorrhage, preeclampsia/hypertension and venous thromboembolism) as well as supplemental bundles on Maternal Early Warning Criteria, Facility Review after a Severe Maternal Event, and Patient/Family and Staff Support after a Severe Maternal Event.

The public Safety Action Series has introduced topics including an overview of the Partnership, efforts underway to define and measure Severe Maternal Morbidity, identify and implement Maternal Early Warning Criteria, Quantification of Blood Loss, and the outlines of the OB Hemorrhage Patient Safety Bundle. These slide sets and audio recordings have been archived and are available to the public.

christine morton headshotThe next event will be Tuesday, October 14 at 12:30 pm EST, with presenters Cynthia Chazotte, MD, FACOG, and Christine Morton, PhD, on Patient, Staff, and Family Support Following a Severe Maternal Event, and you can register for the event here. Registering for any event puts you on a list to be informed of upcoming events and future activities of the Partnership. Childbirth educators and other birth professionals may have students and clients who experience a serious medical event during labor and birth.  Having resources for families and for yourself is absolutely critical.  This information will be covered during the online event.

Christine Morton is a board member on the Lamaze international Board of Directors.   We are lucky to have such an active and knowledgeable professional to serve and support the Lamaze mission and values. Please share this information and get involved.

Childbirth Education, Lamaze International, Maternal Mortality, Maternal Quality Improvement, Maternity Care, Pregnancy Complications , , , ,

Updated “Birth By The Numbers” – A Valuable Tool for Childbirth Educators and Others

October 2nd, 2014 by avatar

birth by numbers header

One of the highlights of my attendance at the joint Lamaze International/DONA International Confluence in Kansas City, MO last month was the opportunity to hear Eugene Declercq, PhD, present a plenary session entitled “What Listening to Mothers Can Tell Us about the Future Challenges in US Maternity Care.”  Dr. Declercq is a professor of Maternal and Infant Health at Boston University School of Public Health. It is always a true pleasure to listen to Dr Declercq, not only for his delightful Boston accent, but also for the creative and impactful way that he shares data and facts about the state of maternity care, primarily in the United States.

declercq-headshotThis presentation was no exception and Dr. Declercq helped conference attendees to tease apart the information gleaned from the most recent Listening to Mothers III study, and look at this information  in relationship to data from the two previous Listening to Mothers studies.

Dr. Declercq reminded those of us in the audience that the most recent update of “Birth by the Numbers” was just made available on the Birth by the Numbers website.  I am a huge fan of the previous versions of this short film, that highlighted statistics on how the United States is doing on several key maternal and infant indicators in relation to other nations around the world.  The information continues to be both eye opening and sobering at the same time.  I encourage you to view the most recent edition included here.

I have seen Teri Shilling, the director of Passion for Birth, one of the Lamaze Accredited Childbirth Educator Programs, use the Birth by the Numbers video in a very clever way when training both doulas and childbirth educators.  This learning activity could also be adapted to use in your childbirth class.  Teri provides a worksheet with many of the important statistics that Dr. Declercq shares in his video, listed out.  The learner must watch the video and assign the correct definition to each relevant number listed.  It helps the viewer to really capture the significance of the different numbers, when they are closely listening for each one and then the video can be debriefed as a group.

Dr. Declercq’s website has tons of useful information that you can take into the classroom.  I subscribe to/follow the blog on his website and look forward to new articles when they come out.   Dr. Declercq also generously shares PowerPoint slides on both the “Birth by the Numbers” presentation as well as “Cesarean Birth Trends” that educators can freely use in their own classroom.

Should you be interested in maps and details on the cesarean birth trends for several other countries, including Australia, Brazil and Germany, that information is provided along with a state by state breakdown.

You can also find the updated Birth by the Numbers video on the Lamaze websites for professionals and for parents.

If you have not seen them, I also really enjoy Dr. Declercq’s  videos “The Truth about C-Sections” and “Debunking the Myth: Home Births are Dangerous” published in cooperation with Mothers Naturally

One last fun fact – did you know that Dr. Gene Declercq is a Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator!   Thanks Dr. Declercq for all you do to get solid data to all of us in fun and informative ways.  I appreciate it.

A challenge for you! How might you use the information in the updated video and on the Birth by the Numbers website in your childbirth class, with doula clients or with the patients you care for?  Do you have any teaching ideas that you would like to share with Science & Sensibility readers?  I would love to hear your creative ideas and I know others would too.  Sharing teaching tips helps all of us become better educators.

 

 

2014 Confluence, Cesarean Birth, Childbirth Education, Films about Childbirth, Lamaze International, Maternal Mortality, Maternal Mortality Rate, Maternal Quality Improvement, New Research, Research , , , ,

CDC & ACOG Convene Meeting on Maternal Mortality & Maternal Safety in Chicago

May 23rd, 2014 by avatar
creative commons licensed (BY-NC-SA) flickr photo by Insight Imaging: John A Ryan Photography: http://flickr.com/photos/insightimaging/3709268648

creative commons licensed (BY-NC-SA) flickr photo by Insight Imaging: John A Ryan Photography: http://flickr.com/photos/insightimaging/3709268648

Earlier this week, I shared information on the Safety Action Series kickoff that all were invited to participate in, by the National Partnership for Maternal Safety – focused on reducing the maternal mortality ratio and morbidity ratio for mothers birthing in the U.S.  This partnership is part of the Council on Patient Safety in Women’s Health Care.  Last month Christine Morton, PhD and Robin Weiss, MPH attended a meeting as board members of Lamaze International.  Christine shares meeting notes and topics that were discussed and what maternity professionals, including childbirth educators,  can do to help. – Sharon Muza, Science & Sensibility Community Manager.

Disclosure:  Christine is a member of the Patient/Family Support Workgroup of the National Partnership for Maternal Safety, and a current board member of Lamaze International. 

Since 1986, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) convened interested persons in public health, obstetrics and maternity care to discuss and share information about maternal mortality, including methodologies for pregnancy mortality surveillance at state and national levels, and opportunities to reduce preventable maternal deaths.   Recently, under leadership of Dr. Elliott Main, medical director of California Maternal Quality Care Collaborative (CMQCC), and drawing from the recent experience of California in maternal quality improvement and work by other organizations and collaboratives, the focus of the interest group has shifted from surveillance to quality improvement.  The meeting has evolved from the early years when 12-20 persons sat around tables to discuss the issue, to this year’s meeting which had over 180 persons registered.  Clearly the time has come for a coalition around improving maternity outcomes in the U.S.

The National Partnership for Maternal Safety was proposed in 2013 in New Orleans, and the goal of the April 27, 2014 meeting in Chicago was to formally launch the initiative and report on the progress of each work group. The goal of the National Partnership for Maternal Safety is for every birthing facility in the United States to have the three designated core Patient Safety Bundles (Hemorrhage; Venous Thromboembolus Prevention; and Preeclampsia) implemented within their facility within three years. The bundles will be rolled out consecutively, beginning with obstetric hemorrhage and advancing to the other areas. To support this national effort, publications are underway in peer-reviewed journals. The first article, as an editorial call to action, appears in the October 2013 issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology, the official publication of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.

Highlights from this year’s meeting included two presentations from CDC researchers William Callaghan, MD, MPH and Andreea Creanga, MD, PhD, on work being done to better identify cases of severe maternal morbidity (SMM) and drivers of racial/ethnic disparities.  One of the goals of creating a working definition of SMM is to help facilities track and review cases in order to identify systems issues and address them through quality improvement efforts.

Next, representatives from selected work groups (Hemorrhage; Venous Thromboembolus Prevention; Patient/Family Support) shared their updates.    It has become very clear from ongoing work within large hospital systems, state-based quality collaboratives and other countries such as the UK, that standardized protocols for recognition and response to preventable causes of mortality and morbidity are effective.  Unfortunately, there is no national requirement for all birthing facilities (hospitals and birth centers) to have updated policies and protocols on these preventable causes of maternal complications.

The good news is that there is a groundswell of support for a coordinated effort to realize the goals of the Initiative.  From state quality collaboratives in California, New York, Ohio and Florida to Hospital Engagement Networks, there are many hospitals already implementing some maternal quality improvement toolkits.  The Joint Commission plays a key role in helping hospitals work on patient safety issues and identified maternal mortality as a sentinel event in 2010 and is now proposing that any intrapartum (related to the birth process) maternal death or severe maternal morbidity should be reviewed.  As the nation’s largest accreditation body for hospitals, the Joint Commission is in a position to provide oversight as well as guidance to hospitals as they develop system-level reviews of these outcomes.

More states are being supported by federal and nonprofit agencies to develop and conduct maternal mortality reviews, and the role of Title V, the only federal program that focuses solely on improving the health of mothers and children, is critical.  Title V is administered by each state to support programs enhancing the well being of mothers and their children.

The last topics of the day were how to address the most common cause of maternal mortality – cardiovascular disease in pregnancy – but not as preventable as the three causes featured in the Initiative.

Suggested topics for future meetings including looking at maternal mortalities due to suicide, helping states with small populations aggregate their data, and addressing the issue of prescription (and other) drug abuse among pregnant women.  Eleni Tsigas from the Preeclampsia Foundation stressed the importance of including women’s perspectives and the emotional, social and ongoing physical sequelae of living after a severely complicated childbirth experience.

How is this information relevant for childbirth educators, doulas and other maternity professionals?  First, the rising rates of maternal mortality and morbidity are in the news.  While deaths are rare, severe complications are more common.  CBEs and doulas can reassure pregnant women in their classes that the likelihood of a severe morbidity is low, and can provide resources to share with women and help them learn which hospitals in their communities have begun the work of maternal quality improvement.  CBEs can share this information with key nursing and medical leaders at hospitals where they teach, and offer to help with the Quality Improvment (QI) efforts.

Childbirth educators and others can help ensure the focus not become too one sided – while it is important for every hospital to be ready for typical obstetric emergencies, it is also important for every hospital to be prepared to support women through normal physiologic birth by trained staff and supportive physicians. AWHONN launched its campaign, “Go the full 40” in January 2012 to help everyone remember that while we don’t want to ELECTIVELY deliver babies prior to 39 completed weeks gestation, we also want to support labor starting on its own.  And most recently, ACNM unveiled its BirthTOOLs site, which includes resources, tools and improvement stories on supporting physiologic, vaginal births.  CBEs and doulas can be strong advocates in supporting facility and maternity clinician preparedness for the ‘worst case’ and ‘best case’ scenarios in childbirth.

For more info about National Partnership for Maternal Safety or the CDC/ACOG Maternal Mortality Interest Group, please contact:  Jeanne Mahoney, jmahoney@acog.org

Past and future webinars about the initiative are available to the public here: http://www.safehealthcareforeverywoman.org/safety-action-series.html

Archived presentations from past CDC/ACOG maternal mortality interest group meetings

2014:  http://bit.ly/1sXkaGw

2012: http://bit.ly/1pfay9S

 

Childbirth Education, Guest Posts, Lamaze International, Maternal Mortality, Maternal Mortality Rate, Maternal Quality Improvement, Pregnancy Complications, Uncategorized , , , , ,

U.S. Maternal Mortality Ratio is Dismal, But Changes Underway, and You are Invited to Participate!

May 19th, 2014 by avatar
creative commons licensed (BY-NC-ND) flickr photo by lanskymob: http://flickr.com/photos/lanskymob/5965201901

CC  by lanskymob: http://flickr.com/photos/lanskymob/5965201901

Earlier this month a paper was published in The Lancet, “Global, regional, and national levels and causes of maternal mortality during 1990—2013: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013” that used statistical methods to estimate the number of maternal deaths from all causes in 188 countries between 1990 and 2013. (For comprehensive definitions of maternal mortality ratios as defined by different agencies, please see this link.)

While many countries experienced a decline in the maternal mortality ratio during the studied time period, the United States experienced a disturbing increase.  The U.S. was one of only eight countries to document an increase in maternal mortality in the past ten years.  Our current world ranking for maternal mortality is 60 out of 180 on the ranking list.  As a nation, we have lost considerable ground in the past 25 years.  Women in the USA are more than twice as likely to die as a result of a pregnancy or birth as mothers in Western Europe.

Researchers looking at the data estimate that 18.5 mothers died for every 100,000 births in the U.S. in 2013, a total of almost 800 deaths a year.  The reasons for these dismal numbers in the U.S are not clear.  Suggestions of inaccuracies in reporting, more mothers experiencing hypertension or diabetes during pregnancy, or women becoming pregnant who had serious preexisting health conditions, who in another time, might not have survived to become pregnant themselves are all suspected as contributing to our rate.

The National Partnership for Maternal Safety has been formed and is a multidisciplinary initiative focused on reducing the rates of maternal morbidity and mortality in the United States.  This partnership falls under the umbrella of The Council on Patient Safety in Women’s Health Care. This unique consortium of organizations across the spectrum of women’s health who have come together to promote safe health care for every woman.

maternal safety logo

The Council on Patient Safety in Women’s Health Care is sponsoring a Safety Action Series and the first one is to be kicked off this Tuesday, May 20, 2014. with a free teleconference at 11 AM EST, and all are invited to register.

The purpose of this first session is to share details of the National Partnership for Maternal Safety.  Debra Bingham, DrPH, RN, Vice President of Research, Education and Publications at the Association of Women’s Health, Obstetric & Neonatal Nurses and Vice Chair of the Council on Patient Safety in Women’s Health Care and Mary D’Alton, M.D., FACOG, Chair of the Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Maternal-Fetal Medicine at Columbia University Medical Center.

The session will include:

  • An overview of the purpose, composition, and goals of the Partnership
  • A look at how the activities of the Partnership align with national efforts to reduce maternal morbidity and mortality.
  • A summary of the future activities and deliverables of the Partnership.
  • Including a focus on obstetric hemorrhage, hypertension in pregnancy, and venous thromboembolism.
  • Supplemental materials on maternal early warning criteria (triggers); patient, staff, and family support, and severe maternal morbidity review and reporting.
  • An open Q&A session with Drs. Bingham and D’Alton.

Lamaze International Board Member Christine Morton, PhD attended The National Partnership for Maternal Safety meeting at the recent ACOG conference in Chicago, along with Lamaze President Elect Robin Weiss, MPH. Dr. Morton will summarize the meeting and share her takeaways on the multistakeholder consensus efforts to reduce maternal mortality in a follow up post later this week.

In the meantime, will you consider participating in the first Safety Action Series scheduled for May 20th and learn more about what we are doing as a nation to improve outcomes for pregnant and birthing women in the U.S.A.  Register now for this free teleconference.

References

Berg CJ, Callaghan WM, Syverson C, et al., Pregnancy-related mortality in the United States, 1998 to 2005. Obstet Gynecol 2010; 116: 1302-9.

Kassebaum, N. J., Bertozzi-Villa, A., Coggeshall, M. S., Shackelford, K. A., Steiner, C., Heuton, K. R., … & Basu, A. (2014). Global, regional, and national levels and causes of maternal mortality during 1990–2013: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013. The Lancet.

Trends in Maternal Mortality, 1990-2010, WHO, UNICEF, UNFPA and The World Bank Estimates available at http://www.unfpa.org/webdav/site/global/shared/documents/publications/2012/Trends_in_maternal_mortality_A4-1.pdf.

ACOG, Maternal Mortality, Maternal Quality Improvement, Maternity Care, New Research , , , , ,

2014 Preeclampsia Awareness Survey Highlights Need for Education- Educators Play a Key Role

May 13th, 2014 by avatar

May is Preeclampsia Awareness Month and childbirth educators play a key role in informing families about the symptoms of this disease of pregnancy (or postpartum.) Eleni Tsigas, the Executive Director of The Preeclampsia Foundation shares the results of a recent survey quizzing women on their awareness of this potentially deadly disease.  CBEs and others have a responsibility to share information in a calm, factual way duing class so that women are informed but not scared, should this disease present itself during their childbearing year. – Sharon Muza, Community Manager, Science & Sensibility

Preeclampsia_Pledge

As Executive Director of the Preeclampsia Foundation®, the nation’s only patient advocacy organization for preeclampsia and related hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, I’m excited to announce the results of a recent nationwide Preeclampsia Awareness Survey of more than 1,500 expectant and new mothers. These survey findings are driving the Foundation’s strategies associated with National Preeclampsia Awareness Month this month.

The survey, which was conducted by BabyCenter®, shows a high overall awareness of preeclampsia and that it is serious and associated with high blood pressure. There was also near universal knowledge to call a healthcare provider if experiencing symptoms of preeclampsia.

We’re very encouraged by the awareness that’s been raised in recent years, in sharp contrast to our last study six years ago that found very low overall awareness of preeclampsia. But there’s more to do, because this year’s survey also shows low awareness when respondents were asked about specific symptoms associated with preeclampsia.

The more a pregnant woman knows about preeclampsia, the more likely she is to recognize and report symptoms to her doctor or midwife. That improves time to diagnosis and medical evaluation, which saves lives – for both mothers and babies. And that’s why we’re so focused on improving awareness of preeclampsia.

Preeclampsia and other hypertensive disorders of pregnancy remain a leading cause of maternal and infant illness and death. Globally, by conservative estimates, these disorders are responsible for 76,000 maternal and 500,000 infant deaths every year. In the United States, preeclampsia affects one in every 12 pregnancies, and its incidence has increased by 25 percent during the past two decades.

Key Survey Findings

The recent survey of 1,591 women shows high overall awareness of preeclampsia, its severity and link to high blood pressure, and to immediately report symptoms to their healthcare providers:

  • 83% of respondents had heard of preeclampsia and of those women, 99% knew that it is extremely serious, even life-threatening for mother and baby, very serious, or somewhat serious
  •  88% knew that high blood pressure is a sign of preeclampsia
  • 96% would call their doctor or midwife if they experienced symptoms

Results also show areas that the healthcare community needs to address:

  • Raise awareness of the specific symptoms associated with preeclampsia
    • 78% incorrectly linked preeclampsia to swelling of the feet
    • Only 70% correctly linked preeclampsia to headache and vision changes
    • 3 out of 5 women were not sure about several other symptoms
  • Educate women on when preeclampsia can occur and its long-term impact
    • 44% didn’t know that preeclampsia can occur even after the baby is delivered, up to six weeks postpartum
    • 46% didn’t know that women with preeclampsia are at risk for future health problems
  • Improve access to information, regardless of education or income level
    • Compared to the 83% of respondents in general who had heard of preeclampsia,
      • 51% with some high school education had heard of preeclampsia
      • 37% who earned under $25k a year had heard of preeclampsia

Download the Preeclampsia Infographic

Survey Findings Drive Education Campaign

Released in conjunction with Preeclampsia Awareness Month, the survey findings provided the basis of the Foundation’s education campaign launched this month. Its theme – Take the Preeclampsia Pledge: Know the Symptoms. Spread the Word – highlights the importance of early recognition and reporting of symptoms. The campaign features Promise Walks for Preeclampsia™ across the country, social media events, and an easy-to-understand and share video called Preeclampsia: 7 Symptoms Every Pregnant Woman Should Know. (Spanish version)


 Know the Symptoms. Spread the Word.

Early recognition and reporting of symptoms is the key to timely detection and management of preeclampsia. Women who are pregnant or recently delivered should contact their doctor or midwife right away if they experience any of the symptoms listed below, and healthcare providers should be appropriately responsive. While these symptoms don’t necessarily indicate preeclampsia, they are cause for concern and require immediate medical evaluation.

  • Swelling of the hands and face, especially around the eyes (swelling of the feet is more common in late pregnancy and probably not a sign of preeclampsia)
  • Weight gain of more than five pounds in a week
  • Headache that won’t go away, even after taking medication for pain relief
  • Changes in vision like seeing spots or flashing lights; partial or total loss of eyesight
  • Nausea or throwing up, especially suddenly, after mid pregnancy (not the morning sickness that many women experience in early pregnancy)
  • Upper right belly pain, sometimes mistaken for indigestion or the flu
  • Difficulty breathing, gasping, or panting
  • “I just don’t feel right”

It’s also important to know that some women with preeclampsia have NO symptoms. Healthcare providers can only diagnose preeclampsia by monitoring blood pressure and protein in the urine, which is routinely done at prenatal appointments, so keeping all appointments is vital throughout pregnancy and immediately after delivery.

About the Preeclampsia Awareness Survey

The survey was conducted among visitors to the BabyCenter® website from January 17 to January 20, 2014. A total of 1,591 respondents completed the survey; qualified respondents are defined as female U.S. residents, 18 years or older, who are pregnant or have at least one child three years of age or younger.

About the Preeclampsia Foundation

A U.S.-based 501(c)(3) non-profit organization established in 2000, the Preeclampsia Foundation is dedicated to providing patient support and education, raising public awareness, catalyzing research and improving health care practices, envisioning a world where preeclampsia and related hypertensive disorders of pregnancy no longer threaten the lives of mothers and babies. More information can be found at www.preeclampsia.org or by calling toll-free 800.665.9341.

How do you talk about preeclampsia in your childbirth classes?  When do you discuss it?  Are you also sharing that postpartum women can also develop this disease?  Would you consider showing the brief video above highlighting the seven key symptoms.  Let us know how you are discussing this topic in the comments section below. – SM

About Eleni Z. Tsigas 

eleni tsigas head shotEleni Z. Tsigas is the Executive Director of the Preeclampsia Foundation. Prior to this position, she served in a variety of volunteer capacities for the organization, including six years on the Board of Directors, two as its chairman. Working with dedicated volunteers, board members and professional staff, Eleni has helped lead the Foundation to its current position as a sustainable, mission-driven, results-oriented organization.

Eleni is married, and had has two of her three pregnancies seriously impacted by preeclampsia. As a preeclampsia survivor, she is a relentless champion for the improvement of patient and provider education and practices, for the catalytic role that patients can have to advance the science and status of maternal-infant health, and for the progress that can be realized by building global partnerships to improve patient outcomes.

Eleni has served as a technical advisor to the World Health Organization (WHO), is a member of the PRE-EMPT Technical Advisory Group and Knowledge Translation Committee (funded by the Gates Foundation), and participates in the Hypertension in Pregnancy Task Force created by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG), as well as a similar task force for the California Maternal Quality Care Collaborative (CMQCC). Eleni is frequently engaged as an expert representing the consumer perspective on preeclampsia at national and international meetings, and as a spokesperson in various public speaking venues. She was honored to deliver The Jim & Midge Breeden Lecture as part of ACOG’s 2012 Annual Clinical Meeting President’s Program.

Childbirth Education, Guest Posts, Maternal Mortality, Maternity Care, News about Pregnancy, Pre-eclampsia, Pregnancy Complications , , , ,