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Is Your Favorite in the Top Five? – Science & Sensibility’s Five Most Popular Posts

March 13th, 2014 by avatar

I have been working as Science & Sensibility’s Community Manager for a few weeks shy of two years.  The past two years have been one of great growth for me personally, as I have stretched myself to explore and more clearly understand research related to maternal infant health. I have “labored” to choose topics that are of interest, current and relevant to our readers. I have deeply enjoyed supporting and collaborating with the many gifted writers who have been kind enough to share their wisdom and their words with all of us. I have welcomed and enjoyed the reader comments and shared discussions with many readers, as they made their opinions, thoughts and viewpoints known.  I have learned along with all of you, as readers asked questions of the blog writers and clarified their understanding of topics.  It has, to put it simply, been a fantastic and fun time.

As I reflected on the past two years , I wondered what have been the most popular posts on the blog, since Amy Romano wrote the first post on Science & Sensibility back in Spring of 2009.  I took a look and found some surprises.  I thought it would be interesting to share the top five posts and ask you, the reader – what posts have been your favorites?  The ones you share with students, clients and patients over and over? The ones you most enjoyed reading?

Top Five Posts on Science & Sensibility

#5. Research Review: Facilitating Autonomous Infant Hand Use During Breastfeeding

© Raphael Goetter

© Raphael Goetter

This post reviewed research by Catherine Watson Genna, BS, IBCLC, RLC and Diklah Barak, BOT that demonstrated that babies use their hands at the breast for many purposes, including stabilizing their neck and head for feeding, causing the nipple to become erect and increasing maternal oxytocin which facilitates delivery of milk to the infant.  The research paper included great photographs and links to videos documenting this behavior.  All the more reason to encourage mothers to unswaddle babies prior to feeding to allow them to do what they do best.

 

 

#4. Help New Mothers Breastfeed in Comfort: Nordstrom Converts Any Bra Into A Nursing Bra for a $10 Fee

Creative Commons Photo: Children's Bureau Centennial.  WPA Project 1938

© Children’s Bureau Centennial. WPA Project 1938

This post shared the little known fact that some Nordstrom stores in the USA would convert a woman’s favorite bra into a nursing bra for a small fee.  Many women find it difficult to find a comfortable nursing bra and are sad to need to stop wearing their favorites.  Now they may not have to.  We heard from lots of readers that not all stores offer this service and the price may vary. Updates would be welcome.

 

 

 

 

#3.  Safe Prevention of the Primary Cesarean Delivery: ACOG and SMFM Change the Game

acog wordlThis recent post by Judy Lothian, Phd, RN, LCCE, FACCE, highlighted the newly released ACOG and SMFM Consensus statement discussing 18 points that these organizations stated would help to reduce the number of primary cesareans being performed.  This statement was groundbreaking in its language, suggestions and proposed modifications to current obstetrical practice, backed up by evidence and certainly in line with much of the research behind Lamaze International’s Six Healthy Birth Practices.

 

#2. What Is the Evidence for Induction for Low Amniotic Fluid in a Healthy Pregnancy?

“It is standard of care in the U.S. to induce women with isolated oligohydramnios at term.” Image Source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/drewesque/2608674753/sizes/l/in/set-72157605814668384/

© drewesque

This post by Rebecca Dekker, Phd, RN, APRN of Evidence Based Birth was a comprehensive research review looking at outcomes of expectant management vs active management of low amniotic fluid in a healthy term pregnancy, as well as the reliability of the most common methods for assessing amniotic fluid volume.  Lots of great information to help women understand the risks and benefits and determine how they would like to proceed if they are faced with this decision at the end of their pregnancy.

 

 

#1 .  The Red/Purple Line: An Alternate Method For Assessing Cervical Dilation Using Visual Cues

marked purple lineThis post, written by Mindy Cockeram, LCCE is the most popular post ever published on Science & Sensibility.  Mindy reviewed and discussed the research on the the red/purple line that may be seen between the butt cheeks/natal cleft and the changes to this line as cervical dilation changes during labor.  This topic was simply fascinating to readers – and shared widely.  Professionals and consumers sent in pictures and discussed in the comments section their own observations.

 

Are you surprised by the top five posts on Science & Sensibility?  Do you have different favorites?  What else would you like to see covered in the future on this blog?  We welcome your input, your comments, suggestions and are interested in your favorite all time posts!  Share your thoughts and suggestions in our comments section below.

Childbirth Education, Healthy Birth Practices, Lamaze International, Science & Sensibility , , ,

Science & Sensibility Wants You to Write for our Blog!

January 14th, 2014 by avatar
image: aimislam.com

image: aimislam.com

My name is Sharon Muza, and I am the current Community Manager of Lamaze International’s blog Science & Sensibility. In this capacity, I would like to extend an invitation to all of you, to consider becoming a contributor to Science & Sensibility.  I would like to ask each of you reading today, to consider sharing your wisdom, your expertise and your experiences with all of the Science & Sensibility community.  Science & Sensibility is a multi-disciplinary blog launched in April 2009 by Lamaze International to improve knowledge of evidence-base maternity care among Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educators and other birth professionals and advocates.  It is one of the leading online resources for up-to-date news and analysis of research and policy issues affecting childbearing women.

Our mission on this blog is to share research about healthy pregnancy, birth and postpartum, We do this by:

  • Presenting new research and helping readers to better understand the information
  • Reviewing books and films on topics relevant to the field of infant and maternal health
  • Interviewing experts that we all want to hear from, on relevant topics
  • Sharing innovative and effective teaching ideas
  • Introducing resources and tools that readers can use to do their jobs more effectively

Our readership consists of Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educators, other perinatal educators, midwives, doulas, lactation consultants, nurses, doctors, therapists, counselors and consumers from around the world.  I can tell you, after doing this job for almost two years, that our readership loves to engage, learn and participate in process improvement to work towards safer and healthier births for all women and babies.

What is your area of expertise?  What topics are you an expert in?  What is your area of research that you want us all to know about?  Do you enjoy breaking down studies in order to better understand them?  What are you doing to help mothers and babies?  Do you have ideas that you are just bursting at the seams to share?  If so, I invite you to contact me so we can discuss potential opportunities for contributing to the blog.

The list of past and current contributors is diverse and consists of many experts and leaders in a variety of fields. It also consists of a lot of regular people, like you and I, who have something important and different to share.  Everyone likes to learn and grow by being exposed to new information and ideas.  I am happy to offer editing support and other assistance to help you, if you having something to share but are hesitant about writing.official experts

If you enjoy putting pen to paper (or fingers to keypad, as that is what really happens today) and sharing thoughts and information on topics relevant to this blog, I would be delighted to hear from you.  If you have ideas for future posts or topics that you would like to see covered (by someone else), I would love to hear from you. I am happy to find just the right expert to do the job.  If you have suggestions on how we can continue to share research and evidence based practices with all those working to improve outcomes during the childbearing year, let me know.  I would be delighted to introduce our readership to some fresh voices, new ideas and perspectives on the topics that matter to us all.

Won’t you consider becoming a contributor to the blog, or sharing your ideas that help shape our future topics?  We are looking for those who will submit one post and others who want to join our regular contributor panel, offering wisdom on a regular basis.  I extend a warm invite to you and look forward to your responses.  Please reach out to me now.

Childbirth Education, Lamaze International, New Research, Research, Science & Sensibility, Uncategorized , , , , ,

A Guide to Finding and Using Images for Teaching, Presentations, Blogging and Other Uses

December 5th, 2013 by avatar

On Tuesday, contributor Andrea Lythgoe wrote “Copy Right! Using Images in Your Presentations and Teaching Materials Appropriately“sharing what educators and presenters need to know when preparing to use images or other works for teaching materials and presentations.  We learned about what it means when a work is copyrighted, (and basically, all work is copyrighted once it is produced by the artist/photographer.) Copyrighted work may not be used without permission from the owner.  Today, I discuss what are the options available to educators with a small to nonexistent budget who need to source images for childbirth classes or other presentation purposes.  I will explain about “Creative Commons” images, how to find and attribute images that you can use and some of my favorite resources for locating appropriate images for the needs of the educator or other professional.

Creative Commons

creative commons logo

cc licensed ( BY ) flickr photo by gnuckx: http://flickr.com/photos/gnuckx/3203364255/

Many creators want to share the work (music, artwork, photos, videos, even academic or scientific material and more) that they have created and make it available for others to use, while still maintaining the rights to how it is used.  Many bloggers, educators, students and others would like to access images and other works without having to purchase the rights, especially for non-commercial purposes.  Some people would even like to modify the works of others for their own purpose.  Enter Creative Commons.  Creative Commons is a non-profit organization that lets creators determine how their work may be used.  Creative Commons has established different licenses so that artists may specify under what circumstances a specific image, video or other creative work may be used by the general public. For a great general introduction to Creative Commons, please view this video on the Creative Commons website.

Creative Commons Licenses

There are six types of licenses under the Creative Commons Agreements.  Some of these licenses are very generous,  allowing the user to modify, tweak, change, build upon and distribute a version of the original work as long as the same level of Creative Commons license is applied to the new work, and this new work may be used for commercial purposes.  The most restrictive Creative Commons license allows the work to be shared for noncommercial  purposes only.  Each of the six license levels require the licensor (creator) to be credited. No matter what level of Creative Commons license is assigned to the item by the licensor, the copyright is still owned by the creator of the work.

cc license typesProper Attribution

Every time  you use a work that you obtained through a Creative Common license, you must attribute it properly.  This can be very confusing at times.  A very thorough guide on how to properly attribute Creative Commons works can be found here.  If you are using the Chrome web browser, there is a very handy extension, Flickr CC Attribution Helper, that automatically formats the correct attribution from any Creative Commons image you are using from Flickr.  Flickr is one of the largest sources for Creative Commons images, so this can be very helpful.  There very well may be other such plugins and extensions for Firefox, Safari, Internet Explorer and other browsers.  I happen to use Chrome, so this extension is one I am familiar with.  Do make every attempt to provide the correct attribution for a piece of work.  If the artist was kind enough to share it, you should honor their request to be correctly attributed.

My Favorite Sources for Images and More

I have several favorite sites for finding images to use in this blog, my teaching materials, presentations and other image needs.  I would like to share them here with you.

Creative Commons Search

CC by search.creativecommons.org

CC by search.creativecommons.org

The mother of all Creative Commons search tools.   Easy to use, this website lets you specify if you want to use the material for commercial purposes or make changes to the original work.  You enter your search terms, and select the venue that you want to search and off you go.  You can find videos, music, images and artwork, along with other material.  If you don’t find what you are looking for, come back and try another option from the main site.

Wikimedia Commons

wikimedia commons logo

CC wikipedia.org/

A repository of almost 20 million educational media content images, including sound and video clips that are free to use and modify.  This site functions much like Wikipedia does, allowing everyone to edit it.  Work is available in a multitude of languages from this site. The main purpose of the site was to provide a source of images and other media to be used on the Wikipedia Commons site, but the material is also freely downloadable as well.

 

 

Flickr

flickr-logo

CC userlogos.org

Flickr has compiled millions and millions of photography images that are free for  you to use under the Creative Commons license.  The number of images available grows by leaps and bounds every day with new material added all the time.  Flickr also has a very large collection from the world’s public photography archive, in a collection called The Commons.  This is a great place to find old pictures from many public institutions.  Remember if you are using Chrome, check out Flickr CC Attribution Helper. Not all the images on Flick are available for use, so double check before using.

 

Google Images

google images logo

CC- google.com

Google Images is another one of my favorites for images, clip art, pictures along with technical drawings and illustrations.  To find Creative Commons work, you will want to go to the advanced settings (click on the gear image in the upper right,) and select the type of license you want near the bottom. Don’t worry, it is easy to change once your search returns some images. Doing this ensures you are using images that you are licensed to use under the Creative Commons license.

Other sites that I want you to know about include Pixabay, Every Stock Photo, PhotoPin and Bing Images. All of these image search engines let you limit the results to the material you can use under a Creative Commons License.  At times, I need to hit several different tools to find just the right image that I feel is perfect for what I am trying to convey.  Finding the right image is one of my favorite parts of working on Science & Sensibility.

What do you do to find images and other media for your teaching and presentations? What are your favorite sites?  Do you have additional tips and tricks to share with Science & Sensibility readers?  Let us know in the comments section.

Childbirth Education, Continuing Education, Science & Sensibility, Series: Finding and Using Images and Copy , , , , ,

Copy Right! Using Images in Your Presentations and Teaching Materials Appropriately

December 3rd, 2013 by avatar

Today on Science & Sensibility, contributor Andrea Lythgoe, LCCE, birth doula and photographer shares information about using images and text in your work as a birth professional – for teaching, marketing or other purposes.  Using images and other works responsibly is the right thing to do, but you may be confused on how to go about it.  Today’s post will help and on Thursday I share information on how to locate materials that you are free to use. – Sharon Muza, Community Manager

Image Source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/horiavarlan/

Image Source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/horiavarlan/

When you are a childbirth educator or other birth professional, you may find yourself teaching a class, giving a presentation, designing a website or making attractive handouts and marketing materials. You take great pains to make sure that your work is visually pleasing and attractive.

You may be inclined to find images for your work by quickly searching online for exactly the right picture to get your message across.  It’s easy, it’s quick and free.

Photographs, drawings, paintings, music, writing and all other artwork are protected by copyright laws, and you cannot use them without the permission of the artist. Ever. It does not need to say “copyright” in order to be copyrighted. It does not need to be watermarked. It does not need to say “All Rights Reserved.” The copyright exists the moment the work is created. There are serious consequences for taking others’ work without permission.

When you are producing something that will be used for educational purposes, you might wonder if the laws allow you to use copyrighted images under those circumstances. There is an exception to the copyright law called “Fair Use” where it might be acceptable to use them without permission or payment. But what exactly constitutes “fair use” can be very complicated and hazy. I’m not an attorney, but I do have some suggestions to keep you firmly in the realm of safe use.

Don’t use images without permission for commercial use

Don’t use images without permission for anything remotely commercial, unless they are images you acquired under a Creative Commons license.  (See this Thursday’s post for more on Creative Commons.)  If your web site, blog or social media site is promoting your childbirth classes, you’re advertising a commercial venture. If your handout is used during classes that you’re being paid to teach, that’s profit making and probably not OK. If you’re presenting at a conference and being paid to present – ask permission. Even if you are not being paid, check to see if the conference is going to be selling a recording of your presentation. At the most recent Lamaze International conference, a company recorded audio that was synced to the presenter’s Powerpoint, which was then made available for purchase. Any images in those presentations are therefore being resold for profit. This means you need permission for commercial use of those photos, diagrams, and graphics.

Don’t modify anything without permission

Modifying includes cropping, removing a watermark, turning it black and white, making it part of a collage, adding text to turn it into a meme, or anything else you might be tempted to change. As a birth photographer, I am very careful of my client’s privacy and want to make sure that their family’s personal moments are only used in the ways they are comfortable with. I may turn down a request to use a photo in a meme because the parents declined to allow me to give third parties a right to use it. I might not allow you to use it in a poster because the parents would prefer limited exposure. Imagine how upset the parents could be to come across it somewhere they did not expect it. Consider the difficult position that puts me in – it appears that I have violated their trust in allowing me to share their images at all.

Credit appropriately

When you are using images with permission, inquire from the photographer or artist how they would like to be credited.  Most people will be happy with their name and website (linked if possible) near the picture, so people are aware of the source.  Find out how to type the “©” symbol for your particular keyboard/computer/software and use it. Alternately, in your presentation, be sure that the owner of the image is credited on the slide where the image is placed.  Printed marketing materials can include information close to the image or in a discreet location at the bottom if appropriate.

Share on social media appropriately

When you see something you want to share on social media, make sure you share rather than download and post as if it were your own. If sharing is blocked, there’s likely a reason! Don’t share from someone who has obviously uploaded other’s content as their own already, either. As a photographer, I’d love it if my images are seen by a wider audience, but I want that audience to be able to know who created the work. I often see beautiful paintings or photos shared without that connection to the artist maintained.

Do not copy and paste text

When it comes to text, don’t ever copy and paste. Writing your own content is crucial to having your own voice. Plagiarizing content is not a victimless offense. I will never forget an experience I had earlier this year when a woman I had been mentoring posted a link to her new web site asking for feedback on the template she used. The wording was mine. It was the wording I’d spent weeks working on to get just right. And just when I thought I had it perfect, I’d had friends and family read and give me feedback. This triggered another round of edits.

And with a simple copy and paste, this woman had stolen my hard work. I must be honest and tell you that it hurt.

Even if you plan to change a few words here and there, that is probably not enough to make it your own. If you’re using enough of someone else’s words that you need to copy and paste, it’s likely too much.

You can quote someone – no more than a paragraph or two – but it needs to be clearly attributed as a quote and should be in the context of your own writing. The OWL (Online Writing Lab) at Perdue University suggests:

“Use quotes that will have the most rhetorical, argumentative impact in your paper; too many direct quotes from sources may weaken your credibility, as though you have nothing to say yourself, and will certainly interfere with your style.”

Summary

As you create your web sites, presentations, class materials, marketing pieces and illustrate your own writing with visuals, please remember that artwork, including photographs, is still work, and that the artists have families to feed and clothe as well. They deserve the respect of honoring that work with a respect of their copyright and payment if they request it.

Please don’t look at copyright law as “Can I rationalize this as an acceptable use?” but instead think in terms of “How can I make sure I am using this appropriately?” – As an artist, my livelihood depends on it.

When in doubt, leave it out!

Check back on Science & Sensibility on Thursday, when Sharon Muza will share information and resources on how to find and access Creative Commons images and other works that you might be able to use freely or even modify if needed for your purpose. Let us know in the comments section what challenges you have faced in creating your own presentations and teaching materials, and any solutions you might have found.

 

Childbirth Education, Continuing Education, Guest Posts, Science & Sensibility, Series: Finding and Using Images and Copy, Social Media , , , , , , ,

Six Birth Blogs Every Childbirth Educator Should Be Reading

September 17th, 2013 by avatar

Today on Science & Sensibility, I wanted to share with readers some of my favorite birth related blogs, after Science & Sensibility of course! I subscribe to over 400 blogs, on a variety of topics, not just birth. I hope that someone has a larger blog list then I do, otherwise I will start to worry about how this might be an obsession.

I really enjoy reading what experts in the field of maternal and infant health have to say on their blogs and frequently find myself sharing information in my classes and with the families that I work with as well as with other professionals. I appreciate the effort, the research, the time and the energy that goes into making my favorite blogs so rich and useful for me, and so relevant to the work I do as an LCCE. 

Here are six of my favorite blogs, in no particular order:

1. Spinning Babies Blog

Midwife Gail Tully has long been well known for her website, Spinning Babies and her blog is an added bonus!  Gail frequently answers questions from readers, describes some new research she came across or shares a new technique to help babies move easier through the pelvis.  Here you can frequently find a video snippet you can use in your childbirth class, a book review or an inspiring birth story usually related to babies who chose to do things their way, as they work to be born.  

2. Evidence Based Birth

This blog burst onto the scene in mid-2012, and has been a fantastic resource ever since.  Rebecca Dekker, PhD, RN, APRN is an assistant professor of nursing at a research university in the U.S. She teaches pathophysiology and pharmacology, but has a strong personal interest in birth, and hence the blog was created.  The mission of Evidence Based Birth is to “promote evidence-based practice during childbirth by providing research evidence directly to women and families.”  Rebecca takes a look at the big issues (failure to progress, big babies, low AFI, for example) that face women during their pregnancy and birth, and does a thorough job of evaluating all the research and explaining it in a logical, easy to understand post.  Rebecca sums up her posts with recommendations based on the evidence and gives readers the bottom line and take-away.  Additionally, there are “printables” that are concise versions of some of her blog posts that families can print out and take to appointments with their healthcare providers in order to help facilitate discussions about best practice.

3.  VBAC Facts

Jennifer Kamel has created a plethora of useful information on vaginal birth after cesarean (VBAC) facts and statistics.  She founded her blog after doing a huge amount of research on the benefits and risks of VBAC, after her first birth ended in a Cesarean and she prepared for her second.   The amount of information, statistics, research summaries and discussion found on her blog is amazing.  Jen is a “numbers gal” and does a great job of explaining risks and numbers in an easy to understand presentation.  I frequently find myself going to her blog when I want to know the risk of placental complications after a cesarean or to better understand some of the new research and policy statements from ACOG and other professional organizations.  When 1 in 3 women in the US will give birth by Cesarean, it is good to have a resource such as VBACFacts.com to go to that can help me understand and explain options to families birthing after a cesarean.

4. The Well-Rounded Mama

Pamela Vireday has written “The Well-Rounded Mama” blog since 2008 and it has been a valuable resource for women of all sizes, when they are looking for answers and facts about options for birth.  The mission of the blog is “to provide general information about pregnancy, birth, and breastfeeding, to discuss how to improve care for women of size, to raise awareness about the impact of weight stigma and discrimination on people of size, and to promote health by focusing on positive habits instead of numbers on a scale.” Pamela does an awesome job of gathering, explaining and summarizing research, particularly related to women of size, but in all honestly, extremely relevant to all birthing women.  I appreciate her plus size photo galleries of pregnant and breastfeeding women of size. If you might be a  woman who is larger than many of the models in today’s pregnancy magazines, seeing the gallery of women who look beautiful pregnant and breastfeeding, with a wide range of body shapes, can be comforting.  In addition to providing evidence based information,  Pamela answers some of the questions that plus sized mothers might have, but are hesitant to ask their healthcare provider, such as concerns about about whether fetal movement will be noticeable if they are larger sized.  A great blog, with relevant articles for all women!

5. Midwife Thinking

This blog is written by Rachel Reed, an Australian PhD midwife, who enjoys taking a look at the research and sharing her thoughts on how well the research is applied to application.  I enjoy reading her blog for that reason, and often find myself amazed that she chooses to write about the very topics that I wonder about and want to learn more on.  Rachel’s aim is to “stimulate thinking and share knowledge, evidence and views on birth and midwifery. ”  I also appreciate her “Down Under” perspective and celebrating the commonalities of birth across the many miles.  Rachel is not afraid to agree when the science backs up the “less popular” treatment and care amongst childbirth advocates, allowing the evidence to speak for itself and carefully explaining why.   Rachel does a great job of normalizing many of the topics that bog women down during labor and birth, such as the “anterior cervical lip” or “early labor and mixed messages.”  I like to share Rachel’s posts with families who are experiencing the very situation she is writing about.

6. ACOG President’s Blog

Every week, the current president of the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) writes a blog post on a matter of importance to women.  Not all the posts are on birth related topics, but I find it very interesting to see what Dr. Jeanne A. Conry, M.D. PhD shares with readers.  While some of her blogs are directed at her fellow physicians, many of the posts highlight information and resources directly related to women’s health, especially during the reproductive years.  I enjoy learning more about what Dr. Conry feels is important, and especially what messages and information she is directing to her colleagues. I appreciate her middle of the road approach and look forward to a new post every week.

I hope that you might consider following some of the blogs I mentioned here, if you are not already doing so.  I would also love if you shared your favorite blogs with myself and our Science & Sensibility readers.  I always have room for more good birth related blogs in my blog reader!  What blogs do you read?

ACOG, Authoritative Knowledge, Breastfeeding, Cesarean Birth, Childbirth Education, Continuing Education, Evidence Based Medicine, Maternity Care, Midwifery, Research, Science & Sensibility , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,