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Every Day Should Be Maternal Mental Health Awareness Day! What Educators Need To Know!

May 27th, 2014 by avatar

Friday_may_campaignMay is Maternal Mental Health Awareness month, when agencies on the local, state and federal level along with private and public organizations promote campaigns designed to increase awareness of perinatal mood disorders.   While it is good to increase awareness of the symptoms, sources of help, treatment options and impact of perinatal mood disorders on parents, families and communities during the month of May, the focus really needs to be 365 days a year!  Over 4 million babies are born every year in the USA.  Pregnancy and birth happen every single day to women and families.  Perinatal mood disorders affect women and their families every single day!

Recently, the tragic death of three young children in Torrence, CA was in the news and the children’s mother was arrested on suspicion of murdering her three daughters.  While many details have yet to be made public, this was a new mother  whose youngest child was just two months old.  This woman may have been experiencing a crisis as a result of a postpartum mood or anxiety disorder (PPMAD).

Take this quick ten question quiz and test your knowledge of perinatal mood disorders.  Then read on to find out more and what you can do to help the families that you work with.

While PPMAD can affect a mother during pregnancy or the first year postpartum, there are some risk factors that may increase the likelihood of a woman experiencing this complication:

The above list is from the resource: Postpartum Progress

There is a wonderful three minute video from the 2020 Mom Project that explains more about why so many women are not receiving the help they need. This video was released by the National Coalition for Maternal Mental Health. We do not have the infrastructure in place that screens every woman or enough skilled providers who can recognize the symptoms and provide or refer to suitable treatment options.

Some typical (but not all inclusive) symptoms of Postpartum Mood and Anxiety Disorders

  • Are you feeling sad or depressed?
  • Do you feel more irritable or angry with those around you?
  • Are you having difficulty bonding with your baby?
  • Do you feel anxious or panicky?
  • Are you having problems with eating or sleeping?
  • Are you having upsetting thoughts that you can’t get out
  • of your mind?
  • Do you feel as if you are “out of control” or “going crazy”?
  • Do you feel like you never should have become a mother?
  • Are you worried that you might hurt your baby or yourself?

Childbirth educators and others who work with women during the childbearing year have a responsibility to discuss, share, educate and provide resources to all the families they work with.  Ignorance is not bliss, and the more we discuss the symptoms, risk factors and resources that are available to help families in need with those we have contact with, the fewer women will suffer in silence and go without the help they need.

Resources for Women and PartnersPostpartum Progress

 Postpartum Psychosis Symptoms (in Plain Mama English)

Postpartum Support International 1-800-944-4PPD

 National Suicide Prevention Lifeline 1-800-273-TALK

Mother to Baby (formerly OTIS)

Medications & More During Pregnancy & Breastfeeding.

(866) 626-6847

Text-4-Baby Health Info Links

How do you talk about perinatal mood and anxiety disorders in your classes?  What activities do you do to convey this information effectively?  Do you bring up this topic again at the childbirth class reunions you attend?  Can you share what works well for you so that we can all learn?  What have your experiences been in helping women and their partners to be knowledgeable and informed? What do you do to be sure that every day is Maternal Mental Health Awareness Day?

 

Babies, Birth Trauma, Breastfeeding, Childbirth Education, Depression, Infant Attachment, Maternal Mental Health, Paternal Postnatal Depression, Perinatal Mood Disorders, Postpartum Depression , , , , , , , , , ,

“Break Time for Nursing Mothers” – It’s the Law!

May 8th, 2014 by avatar

By Kathleen Marinelli, M.D.

In honor of Mother’s Day, which is coming up this weekend, I thought it would be important to talk about a challenge that many mothers face after having a baby.  Returning to work and continuing to breastfeed their baby.  Many countries offer a generous leave for new mothers, but here in the USA, it is not uncommon for a new mother to find herself back at work 6 weeks after giving birth.  So many challenges face these women, and the added pressure of work environment that is unsupportive of the breastfeeding relationship and the mother’s need to have a private, appropriate place to pump and store her  milk while separated from her baby is not only critical, it’s the law.  Today on Science & Sensibility, Kathleen Marinelli, M.D, the Chairwoman of the United States Breastfeeding Committee updates us on the “Break Time for Nursing Mothers” law and shares resources for clients and students who are returning to work and breastfeeding.  While this day seems far away to families sitting in  a childbirth class, making space for this discussion and sharing resources can help women to continue to breastfeeding smoothly after returning to work. – Sharon Muza, Community Manager, Science & Sensibility.

With more than half of women with infants employed, simple workplace accommodations are critical for breastfeeding success. By helping moms understand their rights as a breastfeeding employee and plan for their return to work, childbirth educators, doulas, health care providers and lactation care providers can support a successful transition so that working moms are supported to reach their personal breastfeeding goals.

The federal “Break Time for Nursing Mothers” law requires employers to provide break time and a private place for hourly paid employees to pump breast milk during the work day. The United States Breastfeeding Committee’s Online Guide: What You Need to Know About the “Break Time for Nursing Mothers” Law compiles key information to ensure every family and provider has access to accurate and understandable information on this law.

Key Facts about the “Break Time for Nursing Mothers” Law:

Who is covered: The law applies to nonexempt (hourly) employees covered by the Fair Labor Standards Act.

Space: Employers are required to provide a place that is not a bathroom. It must be completely private so that no one can see inside. Employers are not required to create a permanent dedicated space for breastfeeding employees. As long as the space is available each time the employee needs it, the employer is meeting the space requirements.

Time: The law requires employers to provide “reasonable” break time, recognizing that how often and how much time it takes to pump is different for every mother. Employees should consider all the steps necessary to pump, including the time it will take to gather pumping supplies, get to the space, pump, clean up, and return to their workspace. Employers must provide time and space each time the employee needs it throughout her work day.

Enforcement: The U.S. Department of Labor’s Wage and Hour Division (WHD) is responsible for enforcing the “Break Time for Nursing Mothers” law. If an employer refuses to comply, employees can file a complaint by calling the toll-free WHD number 1-800-487-9243.

Small Businesses: All employers, regardless of their size or number of employees, must comply with the “Break Time for Nursing Mothers” law. Following a complaint from a breastfeeding employee, businesses with fewer than 50 employees may be able to apply for an undue hardship exemption. To receive an exemption for that employee, the employer must prove that providing these accommodations would cause “significant difficulty or expense when considered in relation to the size, financial resources, nature, or structure of the employer’s business.” Until they are granted an exemption by the Department of Labor, they must comply with the law.

State laws: Employees who are not covered by the “Break Time” law may be covered by a state law. Contact your state breastfeeding coalition for help understanding the breastfeeding laws where you serve.

The “Break Time for Nursing Mothers” law was an important victory for families, but breastfeeding success shouldn’t depend on a mom’s job type. The Supporting Working Moms Act would expand the existing federal law to cover approximately 12 million additional salaried employees, including elementary and secondary school teachers. We can all help make this happen! Use USBC’s easy action tool to ask your legislators to cosponsor the Supporting Working Moms Act with just a few clicks. Twelve million employees are counting on us! As Surgeon General Regina Benjamin advised us, “Everyone can help make breastfeeding easier.”

We know that workplace lactation support is a “win-win”, benefiting families, employers, and the economy, yet one of the major causes for the drop-off in breastfeeding rates is the lack of effective, reasonable workplace accommodations when mothers return to work. Employers that provide lactation support experience an impressive return on investment, including lower healthcare costs, absenteeism, and turnover rates, with improved morale, job satisfaction, and productivity. The retention rate for employees of companies with lactation support programs is 94%, while the national average is only 59%!

Breastfeeding and working is not only possible, it’s good for business. Find additional information and resources in USBC’s Online Guide: What You Need to Know About the “Break Time for Nursing Mothers” Law and help spread the word about this valuable new resource with your clients by sharing this link: www.usbreastfeeding.org/workplace-law.

Moms, babies and employers everywhere will be glad you did!!

Important links and information:

Online Guide: What You Need to Know About the “Break Time for Nursing Mothers” Law
Action Alert: Supporting Working Moms Act
Directory of State, Territorial, and Tribal Breastfeeding Coalitions
United States Department of Labor Employee Rights Card
Wage and Hour Division Break Time for Nursing Mothers Webpage
The Business Case for Breastfeeding

Do you talk to patients, students and clients about tips for successful re-entry into the workforce while still breastfeeding a baby?  What are your favorite resources to offer women so they know their rights and understand the responsibilities of their employer to assist them in continuing to express breastmilk for their baby. If you are not mentioning this to your families, maybe you will consider how important this information is after reading today’s blogpost and consider passing on these resources.  - SM

About Kathleen Marinelli, M.D.

Marinellii-head shotDr. Kathleen Marinelli is the Chair of the United States Breastfeeding Committee, an independent nonprofit coalition of almost 50 nationally influential professional, educational, and governmental organizations, that share a common mission to improve the Nation’s health by working collaboratively to protect, promote, and support breastfeeding, where she represents the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine. She is also a Neonatologist and Breastfeeding Medicine Physician at Connecticut Children’s Medical Center, in the Connecticut Human Milk Research Center, and Associate Professor of Pediatrics at the University of Connecticut School of Medicine.

 

Babies, Breastfeeding, Childbirth Education, Guest Posts, Infant Attachment, Parenting an Infant , , , ,

Preparing Mothers for Breastfeeding after a Cesarean – The Educator’s Role

April 22nd, 2014 by avatar

By Tamara Hawkins, RN, MSN, FNP, IBCLC, CHHC, LCCE

© Sharon Muza

© Sharon Muza

April is Cesarean Awareness Month (CAM).  In a post earlier this month, I shared my favorite websites for birth professionals to learn and share with students and clients about cesarean prevention, recovery, vaginal birth after cesarean along with a fun quiz to test your knowledge about cesarean and VBAC information.  Today, as Lamaze International continues to recognize CAM, LCCE and IBCLC Tamara Hawkins shares information on how professionals can help prepare women who will be breastfeeding after a cesarean to get off on the right track for a successful breastfeeding relationship. – Sharon Muza, Science & Sensibility Community Manager.

Working in New York City,  I see many women who have given birth to their babies via cesarean section. Most hospitals in my area have a cesarean rate close to 40% and 30% of those births are primary cesareans.  April is Cesarean Awareness Month and I wanted to discuss cesarean birth and breastfeeding.  As both a Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator and an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant, I work with women both before and after a cesarean birth.  I meet mothers who could have prevented many lactation issues if equipped with a few practices to get breastfeeding off to a good start after a cesarean birth. I want to share some practical teaching tips on preparing a mother to successfully breastfeed after having a cesarean birth. In a childbirth class,  it is important to give anticipatory guidance to mothers in class who are preparing to birth about the realities of breastfeeding after a cesarean.

I recommend discussing breastfeeding after cesarean births in all portions of your childbirth class; labor and birth, newborn care and breastfeeding classes, in order to cover different aspects of breastfeeding initiation.  During the labor and birth variations class, discuss how cesarean births affect baby and mother physically and emotionally. Provide tips on how to get through the first days in the hospital such as skin to skin, rooming in, explain the normalcy of cluster feeding and give breastfeeding support resources for the mother to use once she returns home. I find giving a wealth of well researched information in class will not help a mother who may be having breastfeeding trouble several weeks later after the baby has arrived. In newborn care and/or breastfeeding class, provide additional details: latch, positioning, signs of hunger, feeding length and times, cluster feedings, care for engorgement and sore nipples. Supplement with your list of resources.

Many birth professionals report cesarean births as a common reason for delayed Lactogenesis I. I like to lay out solutions for common concerns and problems that arise for mothers when breastfeeding after a cesarean. These solutions include care for the areola/nipple complex, swelling, positioning and latch techniques, anticipating frequent feedings, feeding a sleepy baby, and caring for engorged breasts.

Solutions and Teaching Points

Insufficient glandular tissue and low milk supply

I have seen an explosion of mothers who have insufficient glandular tissue and low milk supply. During class discussions about baby’s first feeding, explain normal breast changes to expect during pregnancy such as prominent veining, dark areola/nipple complex, growth of about one cup size in breast tissue, and tenderness. These changes indicate the process of Lactogenesis Stage I – when the epithelial cells of the breasts begin to convert to milk secreting cells under the influence of the hormone prolactin. When mothers have no or very little breast growth during pregnancy this indicates a deficiency in stage I of lactogenesis. Often, this is why a mother may have trouble with milk supply and not just because she had a cesarean. It is important we make a distinction in this for the mother because if the mother is blaming herself for an unplanned cesarean and then believes the cesarean birth caused the low milk supply it can cause undue distress. I typically just present the expected breast growth information and state, “If you have not had any changes, feel free to reach out to me or speak with your health care provider about your concerns.” When a mother is empowered with anticipatory guidance, it can help her make solutions to adequately feed her baby at birth, build her milk supply and find appropriate breastfeeding support. Even if she has a cesarean, she should not expect low milk supply unless she has the markers of IGT.

Creative positioning and latch techniques

© http://flic.kr/p/5f29EK

© http://flic.kr/p/5f29EK

We cannot expect a mother to sit straight up in a chair to nurse after a cesarean and we have to model positions to help mothers understand how to nurse laying back, in football positions and cross cradle. The side lying position for mothers who gave birth by cesarean can be hard as the mother can experience pulling on her incision as she is trying to roll on to her side.  Additionally, as she is laying in the side lying position, there can be pain, and some babies’ legs are long and can kick the incision. Depending on the available space where I teach, I can get on the floor and demonstrate how to hold the baby in multiple positions simulating being in a bed. I also discourage the use of “breastfeeding pillows.” They tend to not fit well around a mother in bed. If a mother is in a chair she’s liable to lean too far over to reach the baby who is resting on the pillow. It’s best to teach good posture in classes to prevent maternal back and neck discomfort and demonstrate having the baby up close to mother’s abdomen and breast to affect a deep latch.

Frequent feeding

Parents will receive many “tips” about breastfeeding after a cesarean delivery. Every nurse, health care provider, lactation consultant/counselor, mother, sister and friend will tell her something different about when to feed her baby. It is the role of the childbirth educator to prepare them for frequent feeds and give rationales as to why feeding a baby frequently is important.  Rather than stating a set “frequency” such as feed every 2-3 hours, I want them to understand the newborn’s normal pattern of sleep and wakefulness and how this influences their feeding behaviors. Mothers may be drowsy after a cesarean birth, particularly if the surgery followed a long labor.  They may also be in pain. Pain medication, while necessary for good pain management after surgery, can also contribute to a mother feeling sleepy. Holding her baby skin to skin will help the mother connect with her baby and relax. Both mother and baby need to be relaxed to get breastfeeding off to a good start. Explain to mothers during class that babies may want to nurse within the first hour and to wait for those cues: rooting, hands to mouth and suckling. Babies are often sleepy after cesarean births, especially if mother was pushing, had been treated with magnesium for pre-eclampsia or had been through a long induction. When a baby does not feed as often as anticipated, this will of course upset the mother and can lead to delayed Lactogenesis II.

Educators have to set expectations properly. Working on a time line, I discuss, breastfeeding in the operating room during the cesarean repair and in the recovery room. When partners are in class, teach them how to place the baby skin to skin with mom and support the baby if the mother’s arms or hands are restricted with blood pressure cuffs and IV lines. Discuss hand expression for those sleepy babies who are not rooting within 45 minutes of birth. Dr Jane Morton has a fantastic video illustrating how to express colostrum by hand. This is especially important for babies born to a mother with gestational diabetes, as these babies tend to be at risk for low blood sugar and formula supplementation.

If the baby has to go to the nursery before breastfeeding has been established, we discuss delaying the newborn bath and the rationale. When babies get a bath, not only is the vernix and amniotic fluid (which is a familiar taste to the baby) washed off, the baby will most likely cry, a lot, and fall into a deep sleep making it harder to wake for a feeding. Also, many babies are kept for a longer time in the nursery to warm up after the bath delaying skin to skin and breastfeeding. If the baby has not breastfed in the operating or recovery room, suggest the parents ask for the bath to be delayed until the next day and expect the baby to be on contact precautions. That means there may be a sign on the bassinet alerting care providers to wear gloves when caring for the baby.

Moving along the timeline, we move right into newborn sleep-wake patterns and cluster feedings. I tell them the baby is not born knowing there is a clock on the wall. There is no magic formula that says the baby should be fed 8x/day or every 3 hours or even for 15 minutes on the breast. Expect the baby to nurse 45 minutes every hour for four to five hours straight. That’s when you will really get their attention and can again discuss normal baby routines, colostrum volumes and the size of the newborn stomach.

Dealing with a sleepy baby

Babies born via cesarean can be sleepy for many reasons; exposure to magnesium sulfate and analgesia, long labors, and long second stage to name a few reasons. These babies need to be fed one way or another. Teach clients how to hand express and feed their baby at the breast. Holding the baby close to the breast, hand express 20 drops from each breast and rotate twice between each breast. Approximately 80 drops equal a teaspoon. This is the estimated amount the baby will take in during breastfeedings on day one and two of life. The mother can hand express directly into the baby’s mouth or into a spoon. I prefer a soft baby spoon as a plastic spoon can be sharp on the edges. Hand expression can prevent serious engorgement and increase likelihood of normal Lactogenesis II by stimulating release of prolactin.

Dealing with engorgement

Mothers that get engorged after a cesarean sometimes are dealing with breasts that are extremely edematous. It is important to discuss the difference of being engorged with milk versus engorged with interstitial fluid or swelling. At the time I cover the topic of cesareans in the childbirth class, I differentiate the two by describing how the breasts feel under both circumstances. I describe the breasts as feeling like a bag of marbles when it is full of breast milk and like an overfilled water balloon when it is just interstitial fluid. The care plan for each type of engorgement is a bit different. To start, emphasize on demand feedings to prevent buildup of fluid and discuss the use of Reverse Pressure Softening to remove local swelling in the areolar/nipple complex to affect a deep latch.

Breasts that appear swollen and feel soft like a water balloon need hand expression to get the milk flowing and to keep the areola soft. No application of heat is warranted with this type of swelling. Warm compresses can cause blood and lymphatic vessels in the breast to dilate and release more fluid. The goal is to reduce the swelling. After every feeding, application of cool compresses to the breasts is best. Cold therapy slows circulation, reducing inflammation, muscle spasm, and pain. The goal here is to keep the areola soft to prevent pressure building up around the milk ducts and prevention of milk flow.

Breasts that are hard with palpable alveoli are full of milk. The mother can once again use hand expression to get the milk flowing and will benefit from warm compresses to the breast for about 5-10 minutes before feeding. If her milk begins to leak, than the warmth is a good tool. If the milk does not begin to leak out, that is an indication that interstitial swelling is present and heat should not be used. Only cool compresses after feeding and/or pumping should be used in this situation.

Mothers that have cesarean births are very vulnerable to the hardships that come along 3-4 days after the birth including sore and swollen breasts, possible low milk supply and general recovery complaints that are associated with major abdominal surgery. Giving anticipatory guidance to succeed with breastfeeding amongst these possible issues and challenges are important to help mothers gain the confidence to succeed in making breastfeeding work.

After birth, a mother may have less support in her postpartum room and at home. She may even be alone most of the time during breastfeeding. After her labor and birth, it is likely she will not be able to access information stored in the left side of her brain if she is having breastfeeding difficulties coupled with fatigue and pain from birth. She will still reach out and ask questions. Very likely her first sources will be an online chat room, on a Facebook page or on a website somewhere. Childbirth educators should provide specific resources to find breastfeeding information. Share local breastfeeding and cesarean birth support groups along with the contact information for breastfeeding professionals during your childbirth classes.

I recognize that there is a lot of work to do in the birth world to bring down the cesarean birth from the current 32.8%. We can inform our students and clients with information to keep breastfeeding as normal as possible if a cesarean birth should occurred. It is our responsibility in the classroom to give our clients those tools to help them succeed in breastfeeding no matter how they give birth.

What information do you share with your clients about cesarean birth and successful breastfeeding? How do you prepare them for possible breastfeeding hurdles after a cesarean birth?

About Tamara Hawkins

tamara hawkins head shotTamara Hawkins, RN, MSN, FNP, IBCLC, CHHC, LCCE is the director of Stork and Cradle, Inc offering Prenatal Education and Breastfeeding Support. She graduated with a BSN from New York University and a MSN from SUNY Downstate Medical Center. She is a Family Nurse Practitioner and has worked with mothers and babies for the past 16 years at various NYC medical centers and the Elizabeth Seton Childbearing Center. Tamara has been certified to teach childbirth classes since 1999 and in 2004 became a Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator and an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant.  Follow Tamara on Twitter: @TamaraFNP_IBCLC

Babies, Breastfeeding, Cesarean Birth, Childbirth Education, Guest Posts, Healthy Care Practices, Infant Attachment, Newborns , , , , , ,

Lamaze Celebrates International Board Certified Lactation Consultants & IBCLC Day with a Fun Quiz

March 5th, 2014 by avatar
© ILCA

© ILCA

Today- Wednesday, March 5th, 2014 is IBCLC Day.  Board certified lactation consultants go through a rigorous training and exam process to become certified.  After certification, they are qualified to help women to feed and nourish their babies and support feeding issues that may occur in the mother-baby dyad.  The International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners (IBLCE) is the organization that administers the exam worldwide and approves certificants, along with managing the recertification process.  They also maintain a registry that lists all the certified lactation consultants.  The International Lactation Association (ILCA) is the worldwide professional organization for International Board Certified Lactation Consultants (IBCLCs) and other professionals who support breastfeeding.  ILCA’s website maintains a directory of working IBCLCs so that mothers and professionals can locate an IBCLC in their area.

IBCLCs work in a variety of settings and with a diverse population of women and their babies.  They may also work in other capacities; as a physician, childbirth educator, doula, midwife, nurse or other professional along with their lactation consultant skills.

On Science & Sensibility today, we have a quick and fun quiz to test your knowledge of what an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant might do to help mothers and babies and also highlight some of their skills.   By taking the quiz, you can learn more about what an IBCLC does and how they can be a resource for a wide variety of mothers and babies.


Will you join me in recognizing the IBCLCs that work with your patients, your students and your clients with a brief thank you and shout out for all they do to support healthy mothers and babies?  Every childbirth educator or other birth professional surely has a few favorite lactation consultants who have gone the extra mile for your clients and patients?  Why not send them an ecard to honor the work they do?  Select the perfect ecard here and let the men and women working as IBCLCs know how much you appreciate their efforts.  Join Science & Sensibility and Lamaze International in thanking an IBCLC! And let us know how you did on the IBCLC quiz in the comments section.

Disclaimer:

This quiz may not work on mobile devices.

Tips for using with the Safari Browser:

  1. Click on the settings menu and then Preferences… (or CTRL+,)
  2. Click on the Security tab at the top
  3. Check “Enable Javascript”
  4. For “Accept cookies” – select “Always”
  5. Close the preferences window
  6. Close your Safari browser and reopen and play the quiz again

The ads placed at the end of this free quiz application are at the discretion of the software developers

 

 

Babies, Breastfeeding, Childbirth Education , , , , , , , ,

2014 Confluence – DONA & Lamaze International Want You to Submit an Abstract!

January 3rd, 2014 by avatar

confluence header

You are invited to submit an abstract for the 2014 Confluence – Lamaze & DONA flowing together for safe, healthy, birth and beyond happening in Kansas City, Missouri on September 18-21, 2014.  Abstract submissions are being accepted until January 29th and I know that Science & Sensibility readers are some of the most interesting, engaged and knowledgeable professionals on topics related to pregnancy, birth and postpartum topics that exist anywhere.

confluence definitionThis unique joint conference is breaking new ground in bringing together two long-time leaders in the childbirth professions, DONA International and Lamaze International so that members of both organizations can share learning opportunities, ideas, networking occasions, and collaboration and learn from each other and other experts. Won’t you consider submitting an abstract?

Conference objectives are to:

  • Incorporate the use of technology and innovation in order to meet the needs of childbearing families.
  • Discuss how evidence-based research and best practice guidelines may be incorporated into practice, used to advocate for safe and healthy birth, promote professional collaborations, and support quality initiatives.
  • Implement innovative techniques that support the physical, emotional, cultural and educational needs of childbearing families.
  • Describe current research initiatives and approaches to perinatal care that may impact safe and healthy birth, postpartum, breastfeeding and early parenting.

Abstracts are being solicited that speak to one or more of the following areas:

  • Using Technology and Innovation to Reach Childbearing Women: The Listening to Mothers III Survey indicates that childbearing women are highly connected to social media and widely receive information about childbirth, postpartum, and parenting through social media platforms. How can childbirth professionals connect electronically with new or potential clients and integrate technology into education, support and advocacy? How can we best connect to families with diverse needs? These sessions may consist of case studies, technology tool demos and best practices, or marketing tips for the independent provider, educator and doula.
  • Evidence Based Teaching and Practice: The use of evidence based information is at the heart of childbirth education and labor and postpartum support. Recently developed quality initiatives and professional guidelines can be used to advocate for safe and healthy birth, breastfeeding support, VBAC, parent-infant attachment, and other topics important to parents and to those who provide childbirth support. How can evidence-based practices be combined with awareness and sensitivity to the range of cultural and religious traditions and preferences to promote safe and satisfying births? These sessions will provide information about how to incorporate evidence-based information into support, education, quality initiatives and advocacy efforts.
  • Supporting the Needs of Childbirth Professionals: Doulas, childbirth educators, nurses, midwives, and others are continually searching for creative ways to understand and meet the physical, emotional, religious, cultural and educational needs and preferences of childbearing families. Topics that sometimes generate strong political, cultural and social opinions (for example circumcision, vaccination, and co-sleeping) may be addressed. Presenters will share innovative techniques for supporting and sharing information with pregnant and parenting families. In these sessions the attendees will act as the learning audience and presenters will share with peers unique learning tips and support techniques.
  • New and Emerging Research in the Field of Childbearing: These sessions are for the presentation of new research, practice guidelines and collaborative efforts (published in the last three to five years) that are relevant to childbearing families and those who serve those families. Topics may range from holistic approaches to perinatal care, nutritional recommendations, effects of stress and toxic environmental exposures on pregnancy, the life course approach to healthy birth, preconception health and other subjects. These abstracts may be submitted for a live session or a poster presentation.

The deadline for abstract submission is January 29th, 2014 and I am confident that many of you have expertise, knowledge and skills that need to be shared with this gathering of professionals. What a great opportunity for you to present on your passion and for all the birth professionals; childbirth educators, doulas, lactation consultants, midwives, physicians, l&d nurses, counselors, authors and more to learn from YOU! Receive a generous honorarium and conference discount if your abstract is accepted.

Please consider sharing your wisdom!  Start working on your confluence abstract now.  You can find more information on submitting an abstract and access to the the online abstract submission tool here.  See you in Kansas City!  Let us know in the comments section if you are planning to submit!  I look forward to all of your great ideas!

2014 Confluence, Babies, Breastfeeding, Childbirth Education, Conference Calendar, Conference Schedule, Continuing Education, Uncategorized , , , , , , , ,