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Kathy Morelli Shares Highlights from the 2014 Postpartum Support International Conference

July 15th, 2014 by avatar

Regular contributor Kathy Morelli attended the Postpartum Support International conference in Chapel Hill, North Carolina this past month.  In today’s post, Kathy shares her thoughts, some big take-aways and checks in with the keynote speakers, who share important messages on postpartum mood disorders with our S&S readers.  We all have a responsibility to increase awareness and treatment options for pregnant and postpartum women.- Sharon Muza, Science & Sensibility Community Manager.

PSI QuiltI want to shout from the rooftops that there are so many well-educated, caring and ethical professionals who are focusing on Maternal Mental Health! I was so fortunate to be able to attend this year’s Postpartum Support International 27th Annual Conference at the University of North Carolina (UNC) campus at Chapel Hill on June 18 – June 21, 2014.

PSI’s theme this year was “Creating Connections between Communities: Practitioners and Science: Innovative Care for Perinatal Mental Health.” It was a wonderful meeting where scholar-practitioners in the Perinatal Mental Health field met and exchanged information and best practices in order to hone their collective craft. Researchers, clinicians and identified survivors met and shared their professional and personal stories. PSI’s outgoing president, Leslie Lowell Stoutenburg, RNC, MS, reports that PSI had its largest attendance ever this year.

The keynote speakers were a group of experienced professionals, researchers and clinicians presenting on clinical, scholarly and advocacy topics: Dr. David Rubinow, of UNC Chapel Hill, Dr. Samantha Meltzer-Brody of UNC Chapel Hill, Dr. Marguerite Morgan, of Arbor Circle Early Childhood Services in Grand Rapids, Michigan, Ms. Joy Bruckhard of California’s 20/20 Mom Project, and Dr. Susan Benjamin Feingold, clinical psychologist, all presented about their work in the different aspects in the field of Maternal Mental Health. Advocate Katherine Stone of Postpartum Progress served as emcee at the Saturday night banquet.

Dr. David Rubinow presented on his team research regarding female hormonal fluctuations and the relationship to postpartum mood disorders in sensitive women. Dr. Rubinow is an internationally known expert in the evaluation and treatment of women with mood disorders that occur during periods of hormonal change. Regarding the team’s research, he states “Our data demonstrate that normal changes in reproductive hormones can produce affective disturbance in a susceptible group of women.” The study (Bloch et al, 2000) examined the role of endocrine factors in the etiology of postpartum depression (PPD) by comparing women with a history of PPD and without PPD. Progesterone and estriadiol was measured at baseline, addback, withdrawal, and folIow-up. 67% of the women who had PPD had a recurrence of significant affective symptoms, including a constellation of depressive and hypomanic affect, while none of the control group experienced significant affective symptoms. This indicates that women who suffer from PPD may have a trait vulnerability that isn’t present in women who do not suffer from PPD.

Dr. Susan Benjamin Feingold, the keynote speaker on Saturday evening, presented on her clinical work around the transformational nature of surviving postpartum depression, documented in her newly released book, Happy Endings, New Beginning: Navigating Postpartum Mood Disorders. Dr. Feingold presented inspirational journal entries from women in her clinical practice. She says: “ In my book, I focus on a new view of the postpartum experience and how this difficult time can be a catalyst for change, personal growth and positive transformation. Postpartum depression can be the opportunity for not only healing, but ultimately, it can be a life-changing event.”

Ms. Joy Bruckhard, MBA, of Cigna, presented on her advocacy work in as one of the founders of the Maternal Mental Health Care Collaborative in California called the 20/20 Mom Project. The 20/20 Mom Project is a national campaign and movement for moms and by moms to create specific pathways to treatment for maternal mental health disorders, to address barriers to mental health care. The 20/20 Mom Project has teamed up with Postpartum Support International, a sister non-profit to launch first-of-a-kind web-based training for clinical professionals with the aim of addressing the shortage of mental health and medical professionals who specialize in maternal mental health. Joy says: “I’m so honored to be a part of this important work. Three years ago, my worlds collided: my training through Junior League, my experience in health care working at Cigna and having had two babies myself (and perhaps mild postpartum depression), and some family experience with mental illness, I felt compelled to step up and do more.”

Dr. Samantha Meltzer-Brody, a psychiatrist at UNC Chapel Hill, presented about the ongoing stigma about using psycho-pharmaceuticals during pregnancy and breastfeeding. She expressed frustration that other medications are readily accepted for use during pregnancy, but that there is an ongoing stigma against using medications that treat the mother’s mental health.

Dr. Marguerite Morgan, LCSW, presented on her successful program with African American women at the Arbor Circle Early Childhood Services in Grand Rapids, Michigan. She emphasized that she drops her “PhD-Dr” demeanor and constantly strives to connect at a human level with the people she serves. She is well versed in Christianity and quotes biblical passages about helping oneself during dark times, thus normalizing the experience of depression to her population in an accessible manner.

The psychodynamic approach to perinatal mood disorders was presented by Ms. Lorraine Caputo, LMFT, which addresses the mental health of women across the lifespan. Research and clinical practice indicates that a woman’s previous life experiences can have an impact on her transition to parenthood. On the lifelong care of a woman’s mental health, Ms. Caputo says: “I believe it’s crucial to help women with a history of trauma to make connections between the past and present in a way that psychodynamic treatment is uniquely poised to provide. The perinatal period is a natural time of enormous change, and in the best of circumstances will cause dysregulation, psychological transformation and re-identifications and dis-identifications with one’s own parents. And, given how entirely a pregnant woman and a postpartum mother surrenders her body to her child, childhood sexual traumas in the mother’s past can be triggered by this intense period of physical and emotional bonding with her baby. A psychoanalytic intervention that involves the development of a coherent narrative about how she was parented, and making connections between unrelenting anxiety, ruminations, self blame, and her past history can free a new mother from self doubt, guilt, and fear that she will not be a good mother. This work is done in a carefully paced way, using self reflection and the relationship with the therapist to help the mother feel safe and her powerful feelings contained and held by the therapist.”

Dr. Kelly Brogan, of Womens Holistic Psychiatry, discussed holistic clinical pathways to reproductive mental health.

Of note was the unique reproductive psychiatric sharing session, where reproductive psychiatrists came together to discuss clinical situations which they have encountered. This session was an extension of the collaborative professional LISTSERV that PSI hosts for clinical member reproductive psychiatrists.

Sessions on Healthy Postpartum Relationships were presented by both Ms. Elly Taylor and Ms. Karen Kleiman, LMFT, of the Postpartum Stress Center. Karen Kleiman has recently published her book, Tokens of Affection: Reclaiming Your Marriage after Postpartum Depression, informed from her extensive clinical experience with postpartum couples. Ms. Kleiman presented her overarching framework for treating distressed postpartum couples, identifying 8 tokens to be cultivated in the therapeutic encounter. One of the tokens she refers to as a “Token of Affection.” Ms. Kleiman notes: “Recovery from postpartum depression does not happen overnight, thus, creating a lag between the crisis and a sense of well-being for the couple. During this transitional period both partners are anxious to return to normal while they are simultaneously challenged by buried negative emotions and unmet expectations. Tokens of Affection are gift-giving gestures on behalf of the relationship. As a reparative resource, the Tokens lead the way toward renewed harmony and reconnection.”

Elly Taylor remarks: “It’s common for couples – even happily married ones – to find that the bond between them becomes stretched following the birth of their baby. This comes as a shock for most and increases the risk for perinatal mood disorders for some. But prepare for this, and its possible not only to protect the bond, but build on it as the foundation for family.” She has recently published her book about the postpartum couple’s experience called, Becoming Us, in the United States.

Included here are some closing thoughts from the incoming PSI president, Ann Smith, RN, MSN, CNM:

“PSI is the original and leading organization dealing with perinatal mood disorder which we now know affects approximately 1 in 7 moms. It’s the leading complication of childbearing. All women can be affected regardless of age, race, socioeconomic status and whether the pregnancy was wanted. When treated promptly and by someone who has familiarity with these disorders, moms get better quite quickly. PSI has training programs nationwide which train providers in evidence based treatments. Many women need a combination of medication and talk therapy to get better as quickly as possible. There are a number of medications which have been proven safe for pregnancy and breastfeeding. Support groups are also helpful.

PSI wants everyone to remember three things:

You are not alone, you are not to blame, with help you will be well.

For assistance, call the PSI Warmline at 800-944-4PPD or visit online

References

Bloch, M., Schmidt, P. J., Danaceau, M., Murphy, J., Nieman, L., & Rubinow, D. R. (2000). Effects of gonadal steroids in women with a history of postpartum depression. American Journal of Psychiatry157(6), 924-930.

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Babies, Birth Trauma, Childbirth Education, Guest Posts, Infant Attachment, Maternal Mental Health, Perinatal Mood Disorders, Postpartum Depression, PTSD, Trauma work , , , , , ,

One of a Kind: An Interview with Dr. Meltzer-Brody about UNC’s Inpatient Mother Baby Psych Unit

June 19th, 2014 by avatar

As Postpartum Support International’s 2014 Annual Conference kicks off this weekend in Chapel Hill, NC, regular contributor Kathy Morelli shares her interview with Dr. Samantha Melzter-Brody as Kathy learns more about the only inpatient psychiatric Mother-Baby Unit in the USA.  Perinatal mood and anxiety disorders affect up to 1 in 7 mothers, and at times, inpatient help is what is needed to properly serve the mother and her family.  This unique five bed unit is offering this inpatient care to help mothers get treatment for their perinatal mental health illnesses.  Learn more about this groundbreaking clinic in Kathy’s interview with Dr, Meltzer-Brody. – Sharon Muza, Community Manager, Science & Sensibility.

© Dr. Meltzer-Brody

© Dr. Meltzer-Brody

Dr. Samantha Meltzer-Brody has developed a substantial career as a psychiatrist in the areas of Reproductive/Maternal Mental Health. She is an Associate Professor and Director of the Perinatal Psychiatry Program at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. It’s a comprehensive clinical and research program that includes a five bed inpatient psychiatric Mother-Baby Unit, the first and only of its kind in the United States. UNC’s unit is based on the standard of care psychiatric Mother-Baby Units in Europe and Australia.

In addition, Dr. Meltzer-Brody is scheduled to be the Keynote Speaker on Saturday, June 21st at the Postpartum Support International (PSI) 2014 Conference hosted at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Center for Women’s Mood Disorders. At PSI, she’s speaking about the psychopharmacological treatment of perinatal mental illness.

As a mental health clinician, I admit it took me a while to feel comfortable with the idea that women who are pregnant or lactating who are in need of psycho-pharmaceuticals can do well on them. Now I know there’s a risk-benefit analysis that women should be empowered to employ. Many women in my practice are extremely opposed to taking any medications suggested for their mental health (even when not pregnant or not lactating), so this is a topic with many facets. Each woman is an individual and each woman should talk to her doctor about what’s best for her situation. I’m attending the PSI conference and looking forward to learning more.

Kathy Morelli: How did you become interested in your particular niche, Reproductive/Maternal Mental Health?

Dr. Samantha Meltzer-Brody: First of all, I want to say that I love being a part of the Reproductive Mental Health field.
There are many different roles in the area of Reproductive and Maternal Mental Health, not just one. There are many different types of people needed to work in this area and fill these many different roles. I love that we all can work together, helping each other.

When I began working at the University of North Carolina (UNC) at Chapel Hill, there was no formal women’s mental health program in place. Our women’s mental health outpatient clinic was created at a grassroots level, beginning in the clinics on Wednesday mornings. I was fortunate as UNC Chapel Hill functions with a wonderful collaborative and interdisciplinary atmosphere, so the psychiatry program and the obstetrics program were able to dovetail nicely. In addition, in 2006, our new chair of the psychiatric department arrived, Dr. David Rubinow, who is an international expert in women’s reproductive mood disorders, thus, the time was ripe to create our interdisciplinary Perinatal Outpatient Clinic.

KM: The Mother-Baby Unit at UNC Chapel Hill is the only Maternal-Baby Psychiatric Unit in the United States. I’d love to know more about how the idea came about to develop the Mother-Baby Unit at Chapel Hill. 

SM-B: At UNC, we found there was a high demand for reproductive psychiatry in our outpatient mental health clinics. We have clinic locations in a variety of settings and we found that there was a certain percentage of patients to whom we couldn’t deliver much needed proper care in the outpatient setting nor on a general inpatient psychiatry unit. The Mother-Baby Unit was developed to serve the needs of women experiencing severe perinatal mental illness in a safe and specialized setting to meet the needs of women at this vulnerable time.

As the collaborative team discovered and documented the needs of our patients, we were able to work together at UNC to engage hospital administration at higher levels. We were very fortunate to have a number of champions for this idea within the healthcare system. Initially, we piloted our inpatient program by designating two beds for perinatal patients on a geropsychiatry unit. We developed specialized programming for the perinatal patients and began to get an enormous number of referrals. Eventually, we were able to document that we needed an expanded and completely separate perinatal psychiatry inpatient unit and were able to obtain the support of hospital administration at UNC to launch a new program. And that’s how we became the only Mother-Baby inpatient unit in the United States.

At UNC, we feel it’s critical to have a unit to meet needs of mothers and babies. We feel you can’t mix all the different types of psychiatric populations together. We were able to remodel existing inpatient unit space to create the new unit on a relatively small budget. It’s extremely difficult for the family when a new mom becomes mentally ill and requires hospitalization. Our Mother-Baby Unit helps families through this difficult time by providing family care. It’s extremely rewarding to provide whole care that positively impacts the entire family. We are a state hospital committed to serving the population of the state. Indeed, there’s a state mandate to care for the people of the state, and we take that very seriously.

Keep in mind that our Mother-Baby Unit is a psychiatric care unit, not a respite or spa facility. To be admitted, the patient must meet the criteria for psychiatric inpatient hospitalization, such as suicidal ideation, a heightened bipolar episode or postpartum psychosis or inability to care for self. Most of our patients have suicidal ideation at the time of admission. The average length of stay (LOS) is seven days. Compare this average LOS in the US to the average LOS in a Mother-Baby Unit in Australia of 21 days. We also have a growing number of referrals for women presenting with postpartum psychosis.

When a mother and her baby comes to stay with us, it’s required that a family member, such as the grandmother or father or other identified care provider accompanies the baby on the unit. This is because the babies don’t stay overnight as the health insurance companies in the United States won’t pay for babies to stay overnight. But we work as best we can with the family, in order to preserve the mother’s sleep time for her mental health and also preserve the healthy attachment with her infant. Sleep is especially important when a person is suffering from a mental illness.

In the units, we have bassinets and breast pumps available for the patients and their babies. The nurses’ interaction with the babies vary based on the needs of the particular mother.

Our treatment plans focus on several psychosocial areas of concern. We focus on maternal mood, impaired mother-baby attachment issues, the relationship with the partner and on improving what the partner and family understands about what has happened. To serve these needs, we run several targeted groups: a maternal mental health group, a mother-infant attachment group and a partner group for fathers. But the treatment is individualized; it’s tailored to meet the needs of the family. Due to the typical short length of stay allowed by insurance companies in psychiatric units in the United States, the emphasis is on teaching self-help skills and tools to the patient and family. Such skills and tools are mindfulness, biofeedback, breathing, trigger identification, and post-discharge planning.

KM: There is so much stigma around the diagnosis of mental illness and perhaps more so around perinatal mental illness. Research shows that individuals suffer from both externalized and internalized stigma around a diagnosis of mental illness, much more so than a physical medical condition. So, there’s already stigma about depression and anxiety….it’s already difficult to come forward and then even more so for women to come forward about how they feel, as new mothers and with a baby. There’s shame associated with not coping and also fear about having the baby taken away.

Do you believe there is unconscious stigma around mental illness? Have you seen this phenomena in your work?

SM-B: Stigma is a huge and well documented issue in perinatal mood disorders. It’s very hard and terrifying for people to admit to having a mental illness, especially during the transition to motherhood. There are so many fears around hurting the baby. It’s documented that actual harm to the baby is quite rare, but when it happens, of course it’s a tragedy and the media sadly sensationalizes the event. Plus there is enormous personal shame. Research and clinical experience indicate this shame around feeling emotionally ill and then being diagnosed with a mental illness is exaggerated during the perinatal period. New mothers can feel so insecure and inadequate in their new roles. The stigma, shame and guilt issues are important and need to be part of the therapeutic sessions.

KM: There is so much contradictory information about how hormones, breastfeeding, formula feeding can affect a woman’s self-esteem and mood. Some studies suggest that breastfeeding is protective of depression, yet clinically, some women feel better when they choose to discontinue breastfeeding.

In layman terms, what are your thoughts about the relationship between breastfeeding and postpartum mood disorders? What are some of your guidelines for clinicians to follow regarding the choice of infant feeding method for a woman and her family?

SM-B: At the UNC Perinatal Psychiatry Program, we love to educate organizations that support new moms that women have psychiatric needs. We enjoy the opportunity to educate and influence breastfeeding groups with information about the unique needs of the perinatal population of women with mood disorders. Our feeling is that setting up breastfeeding as an all-or-nothing construct is a set up for feelings of failure for some new moms and can lead to exacerbation of psychiatric symptoms.
It would be great to see the prescription for sleep as a recognized treatment for new moms. And, for mothers with a perinatal mood disorder, to define successful breastfeeding to include one bottle nightly so that mom can sleep for an adequate block of time. This is important for the mom’s brain health.

We also want to emphasize that mothering is not a competitive sport. Our goal is a healthy mother and a healthy baby. Whether or not a woman breastfeeds shouldn’t be colored by judgment of right versus wrong or success versus failure. We need to keep in mind that the goal is that the baby must be fed, even when the mother is suffering from a severe perinatal mental illness.

One thing we do know is that sleep deprivation exacerbates depression anxiety and mood disorders. So we try to help women who wish to breastfeed increase the odds of successful lactation without significant sleep deprivation. We encourage women and families who wish to breastfeed to continue but also set up some guidelines to help the mothers heal mentally and emotionally. We don’t see breastfeeding as an all or nothing activity. At UNC, we say that there can be a combination of breastfeeding and formula feeding in order to support the needs of both mom and baby. We feel that breastfeeding has many benefits and that it’s not an all or nothing equation. We want to enable women with perinatal mood disorders to continue to breastfeed but also help them succeed at mothering, in a way that’s realistic and healthy for them.

KM: Dr. Meltzer-Brody, thank you so very much for your time! You’ve shared enlightened information and guidelines for perinatal clinicians and expanded the definition of mothering to be more inclusive. I look forward to seeing you at the conference at UNC!

What are the health care providers and clinics doing in your area to support the needs of women suffering from perinatal mental illness?  Do you think that your community would benefit from such an inpatient clinic?  How could this become a reality around the country, so all women are served as they should be, with the professional help and treatment they deserve?- SM

Babies, Depression, Guest Posts, Infant Attachment, Maternal Mental Health, Newborns, Perinatal Mood Disorders, Postpartum Depression , , , , , ,

Remembering Doris Haire – A Great Leader in the Field of Maternal Infant Health

June 17th, 2014 by avatar

doris haireDoris Haire, a great leader in the campaign to improve maternal infant health in the USA has passed away.  Ms. Haire died on June 7, 2014.  She was 88 years old.  Doris was one of the first true proponents of evidence based maternity care. Throughout her professional life, Doris advocated and fought for a woman’s right to birth as the mother wanted, free of unnecessary interventions.  Doris led the way in bringing to light the conditions under which women were birthing in the USA with her 1972 essay “The Cultural Warping of Childbirth,” exposing the contemporary childbirth practices of the time.

Along with Drs. Kennell and Klauss and others, Doris sought to change the practice of isolating women from their support during labor and birth and keeping babies apart from their mothers after they were born.  Additionally, Doris also recognized the importance of professional midwives at a time when midwives barely were a blip on the radar after childbirth moved into the hospital at the beginning of the last century. Doris helped establish the first State Board of Midwifery in New York, the first of its kind in the United States which defined the practice of midwifery as a profession separate from nursing and medicine.

Doris traveled to 77 countries to learn about maternity care practices and meet with obstetric health care leaders around the world, in order to gather information that she could use to champion the cause of maternity rights and evidence based medicine here in her own country.  Doris was the Founder and President of the American Foundation for Maternal and Child Health.  Additionally, she served on many boards and committees, such as the World Health Organization, various Perinatal Advisory Committees and others, testified in front of Congress on the topics of obstetrical care and presented at obstetrical conferences around the world.  Doris also spoke at Lamaze International conferences as well.

Doris also examined how drugs are tested and used and published her research in a paper, “How the F.D.A. Determines the ‘Safety’ of Drugs — Just How Safe Is ‘Safe’?”  As a result of this publication, Doris testified at Congress and her actions resulted in changes in FDA regulation and clinical practices. Obstetricians curtailed their use of sedatives and other risky drugs being used for pain relief and millions of childbearing women and their babies have been spared from unnecessary exposure to these risks.

 Doris was also responsible for the passage of the New York Maternity Information Act, which requires every hospital to provide the information and statistics about its childbirth practices and procedures including rates of cesarean section, forceps deliveries, induced labor, augmented labor, and epidurals.

Doris Haire also wrote the following:

The Pregnant Patient’s Bill of Rights

  1. The Pregnant Patient has the right, prior to the administration of any drug or procedure, to be informed by the health professional caring for her of any potential direct or indirect effects, risks or hazards to herself or her unborn or newborn infant which may result from the use of a drug or procedure prescribed for or administered to her during pregnancy, labor, birth or lactation.
  2. The Pregnant Patient has the right, prior to the proposed therapy, to be informed, not only of the benefits, risks and hazards of the proposed therapy but also of known alternative therapy, such as available childbirth education classes which could help to prepare the Pregnant Patient physically and mentally to cope with the discomfort or stress of pregnancy and birth. Such classes have been shown to reduce or eliminate the Pregnant Patient’s need for drugs and obstetric intervention and should be offered to her early in her pregnancy in order that she may make a reasoned decisions.
  3. The Pregnant Patient has the right, prior to the administration of any drug, to be informed by the health professional who is prescribing or administering the drug to her that any drug which she receives during pregnancy, labor and birth, no matter how or when the drug is taken or administered, may adversely affect her unborn baby, directly or indirectly, and that there is no drug or chemical which has been proven safe for the unborn child.
  4. The Pregnant Patient has the right if Cesarean birth is anticipated, to be informed prior to the administration of any drug, and preferably prior to her hospitalization, that minimizing her intake of nonessential pre-operative medicine will benefit her baby.
  5. The Pregnant Patient has the right, prior to the administration of a drug or procedure, to be informed of the areas of uncertainty if there is NO properly controlled follow-up research which has established the safety of the drug or procedure with regard to its on the fetus and the later physiological, mental and neurological development of the child. This caution applies to virtually all drugs and the vast majority of obstetric procedures.
  6. The Pregnant Patient has the right, prior to the administration of any drug, to be informed of the brand name and generic name of the drug in order that she may advise the health professional of any past adverse reaction to the drug.
  7. The Pregnant Patient has the right to determine for herself, without pressure from her attendant, whether she will or will not accept the risks inherent in the proposed treatment.
  8. The Pregnant Patient has the right to know the name and qualifications of the individual administering a drug or procedure to her during labor or birth.
  9. The Pregnant Patient has the right to be informed, prior to the administration of any procedure, whether that procedure is being administered to her because a) it is medically indicated, b) it is an elective procedure (for convenience, c) or for teaching purposes or research).
  10. The Pregnant Patient has the right to be accompanied during the stress of labor and birth by someone she cares for, and to whom she looks for emotional comfort and encouragement.
  11. The Pregnant Patient has the right after appropriate medical consultation to choose a position for labor and birth which is least stressful for her and her baby.
  12. The Obstetric Patient has the right to have her baby cared for at her bedside if her baby is normal, and to feed her baby according to her baby’s needs rather than according to the hospital regimen.
  13. The Obstetric Patient has the right to be informed in writing of the name of the person who actually delivered her baby and the professional qualifications of that person. This information should also be on the birth certificate.
  14. The Obstetric Patient has the right to be informed if there is any known or indicated aspect of her or her baby’s care or condition which may cause her or her baby later difficulty or problems.
  15. The Obstetric Patient has the right to have her and her baby’s hospital- medical records complete, accurate and legible and to have their records, including nursing notes, retained by the hospital until the child reaches at least the age of majority, or, alternatively, to have the records offered to her before they are destroyed.
  16. The Obstetric Patient, both during and after her hospital stay, has the right to have access to her complete hospital-medical records, including nursing notes, and to receive a copy upon payment of a reasonable fee and without incurring the expense of retaining an attorney.

Comprehensive and forward thinking at the time of publication, unfortunately, many mothers are still finding it hard to have all 16 points complied with during a pregnancy, labor, birth and postpartum period.

Well known, well loved and deeply respected, Doris Haines was a leader advocating for the rights of mothers and babies for more than 50 years.  She never faltered and provided unlimited energy and dedication to improving childbirth in the United States.  Doris Haire was a role model for all of us and she will be certainly missed.

Donations to celebrate her life may be made to the American Foundation for Maternal and Child Health, P.O. BOX 555, Keswick, VA 22947.

A complete list of Doris Haire’s publications may be found here.

 

Childbirth Education, Do No Harm, Evidence Based Medicine, Infant Attachment, Maternal Quality Improvement, Maternity Care, Transforming Maternity Care , , ,

11 Ideas to Share with Families that Encourage Father-Baby Bonding

June 12th, 2014 by avatar
flickr.com/photos/44068064@N04/8587557448

flickr.com/photos/44068064@N04/8587557448

With Father’s Day right around the corner, now is a great time to check in with your curriculum and confirm that you share lots of information on how fathers can connect with their new babies.  In the early days and weeks after birth, mothers spend a lot of time with their newborns, getting breastfeeding well established and recovering from childbirth with their babies by their side.  And this is as it should be.  Fathers often can feel left out or excluded, simply because of frequent nursings and the comfort that babies get from being close to their mothers.

It is good to share with fathers that there are many ways to connect and bond with their newborns and young infants.  I like to cover many of these topics throughout my childbirth education classes, so that the fathers leave feeling excited and positive about connecting with their children in these very special ways.

1. Early interaction

Connecting fathers and their newborns early in the first hours can help cement the bond between a father and his child.  Dr. John Klaus and Phyllis Klaus, in their book, “Your Amazing Newborn” state that when a father is given the opportunity to play with his newborn in the first hours after birth, and make eye to eye contact, he spends considerably more time with his child in the first three months than fathers who did not have this intimate connection in the first hours.  When the mother gets up to take her first shower is a wonderful time for fathers to share this early bonding time with their newborns.

2. Skin to skin

The benefits of skin to skin with a newborn are well known; temperature regulation, stress reduction, stabilization of blood sugar, release of oxytocin (the love hormone), comfort and security.  Fathers can and should have skin to skin time with their newborns as soon as it makes sense to do so.  Getting a new father settled in a comfortable chair, with his shirt off, a naked baby on his chest and both of them covered by a cozy blanket is a wonderful opportunity for both of them to benefit from the oxytocin release that will occur.  And is there really anything better than the smell and touch of a just born baby?

3. Singing to baby

Penny Simkin has written here before on the benefits to singing to your baby in utero, and then using that familiar song once baby has been born to calm and sooth the newborn.  Fathers can choose a special song or two and sing it to the baby  frequently during pregnancy, and then that can become his special song to sing to the baby on the outside. A wonderful opportunity for connection and bonding between the two.

4. Bathing with baby

New babies love nothing more than taking a bath safely cradled in the arms of a parent.  While most newborns don’t require frequent bathing, having the father take a bath in body temperature water with the baby on their chest is a wonderful way to relax and bond.  The baby feels secure and comforted and the father can enjoy a relaxing bath while focusing on enjoying time with their newborn.  Remember, safety first!  Always have another adult available to hand the baby off to when entering and exiting the tub.  Babies are slippery when wet.

5. Paternity leave

While the United States is hardly known for its generous leave for parents after the birth of a baby, both mothers and fathers are entitled to take up to 12 weeks of unpaid time off in the first year after the birth (or adoption) of a child according to the Family and Medical Leave Act and still have job protection.  Fathers can plan to utilize this benefit and even consider using some of this leave when (and if) the mother returns to work, taking the opportunity to be the primary parent for a period of time. Planning ahead for this leave both from a financial and workload standpoint would be helpful.

6. Reading to baby

Fathers can make time everyday to read to their baby.  Certainly, when very young, the baby is not understanding the words, but nevertheless, newborns and young infants are fascinated with the sound of human voices and are very comforted by being held close and listening to the voice of their father, safe and familiar.  In the beginning, it is not even important what is being read, just that time is set aside to do so.  Read your favorite novel, magazine or newspaper if you like!  As the baby gets a bit older, you can start reading more age appropriate books with pictures that are attractive to infants.

flickr.com/photos/beccaplusmolly/2652566750

7. Babywearing

Babywearing offers a great opportunity for fathers and babies (even newborns) to connect and bond.  Most babies love to be worn, and when a father does so safely it is a chance to further strengthen the bond between a father and his child.  Additionally, wearing a baby makes it easy to be out in public or doing tasks and chores around the home, or even working, depending on what type of job the father may have.  There are many types of carriers on the market and families should always make sure they are using a carrier safely and responsibly, and that it fits both father and baby well.  In my classroom, I have several different types of baby carriers hung on a wall, for families to try and I provide a weighted doll so that folks can get an idea of what it really feels like.

8. Exercising

Fathers can find ways to get their much needed exercise in while also spending time with their baby.  When their baby is very young, talking the baby for a walk, in a baby carrier or a stroller, is a great way to get out and burn some calories while being with their child.  As the baby gets older, putting them in a child seat on a bike, using a jogging stroller, or a bike trailer, is another alternative allowing dad to pick up the pace.  Consideration should always be taken to follow the instructions and age/weight guidelines that come with the equipment to prevent injury to the child.

9. Establish returning home rituals

Returning home from work after a long day offers fathers a chance to connect with and bond with their baby.  Encourage fathers to have a clear transition from work to home and taking a deep breath before getting ready to be fully present with their baby when they walk in the door.  Have a special ritual of greeting, welcoming the child into your arms and taking a few minutes to reconnect after a day (or night) of separation can make for a lovely opportunity for bonding and easing back into being home with those you love.

10. Father-child traditions

Fathers may want to continue traditions and special activities that they did with their fathers when they were children or consider starting some new ones of their own.  Going to the donut shop for Sunday morning goodies, Friday night family movie night, attending certain community activities and sporting events all offer quality time for children to further connect with their fathers.  Encourage the fathers in your class to recall the special traditions they had with their fathers or male role model, and continue the activities with their own children, or create their own new ones.

11. Parenting – not babysitting

One of my pet peeves is when I hear parents (both mothers and fathers do this) talk about how the father is “babysitting” or “watching” their children.  In my mind, a father no more babysits their child than the mother does.  They parent their child and sometimes that means being alone with the child and sometimes that is jointly with the other parent.  I model this speech by using the term parenting vs the other alternatives that imply that spending time with their children is not something that fathers regularly do.

It can be easy to forget, especially in the sometimes chaotic first weeks and months of welcoming a baby, that fathers have a lot to offer to their new child and it benefits both the parents and the baby to establish this connection and enhance bonding early and often.  Do you take the opportunity to share ideas with the families in your classes on the importance of father baby time?  In honor of Father’s Day this upcoming Sunday, recommit to encouraging these and other appropriate activities to the families in your class.  Please share other suggestions that you have for helping fathers to bond with their new babies.

Please note: I recognize that not every family is made up of a mother and a father, and that families all look different.  Today we honor the father in celebration of Father’s Day.  But a hearty thanks goes out to all the parents who work hard everyday to love and protect their children.

References

Klaus, M. H., & Klaus, P. H. (1998). Your amazing newborn. Da Capo Press.

 

Childbirth Education, Infant Attachment, Newborns, Parenting an Infant , , , , , ,

Every Day Should Be Maternal Mental Health Awareness Day! What Educators Need To Know!

May 27th, 2014 by avatar

Friday_may_campaignMay is Maternal Mental Health Awareness month, when agencies on the local, state and federal level along with private and public organizations promote campaigns designed to increase awareness of perinatal mood disorders.   While it is good to increase awareness of the symptoms, sources of help, treatment options and impact of perinatal mood disorders on parents, families and communities during the month of May, the focus really needs to be 365 days a year!  Over 4 million babies are born every year in the USA.  Pregnancy and birth happen every single day to women and families.  Perinatal mood disorders affect women and their families every single day!

Recently, the tragic death of three young children in Torrence, CA was in the news and the children’s mother was arrested on suspicion of murdering her three daughters.  While many details have yet to be made public, this was a new mother  whose youngest child was just two months old.  This woman may have been experiencing a crisis as a result of a postpartum mood or anxiety disorder (PPMAD).

Take this quick ten question quiz and test your knowledge of perinatal mood disorders.  Then read on to find out more and what you can do to help the families that you work with.

While PPMAD can affect a mother during pregnancy or the first year postpartum, there are some risk factors that may increase the likelihood of a woman experiencing this complication:

The above list is from the resource: Postpartum Progress

There is a wonderful three minute video from the 2020 Mom Project that explains more about why so many women are not receiving the help they need. This video was released by the National Coalition for Maternal Mental Health. We do not have the infrastructure in place that screens every woman or enough skilled providers who can recognize the symptoms and provide or refer to suitable treatment options.

Some typical (but not all inclusive) symptoms of Postpartum Mood and Anxiety Disorders

  • Are you feeling sad or depressed?
  • Do you feel more irritable or angry with those around you?
  • Are you having difficulty bonding with your baby?
  • Do you feel anxious or panicky?
  • Are you having problems with eating or sleeping?
  • Are you having upsetting thoughts that you can’t get out
  • of your mind?
  • Do you feel as if you are “out of control” or “going crazy”?
  • Do you feel like you never should have become a mother?
  • Are you worried that you might hurt your baby or yourself?

Childbirth educators and others who work with women during the childbearing year have a responsibility to discuss, share, educate and provide resources to all the families they work with.  Ignorance is not bliss, and the more we discuss the symptoms, risk factors and resources that are available to help families in need with those we have contact with, the fewer women will suffer in silence and go without the help they need.

Resources for Women and PartnersPostpartum Progress

 Postpartum Psychosis Symptoms (in Plain Mama English)

Postpartum Support International 1-800-944-4PPD

 National Suicide Prevention Lifeline 1-800-273-TALK

Mother to Baby (formerly OTIS)

Medications & More During Pregnancy & Breastfeeding.

(866) 626-6847

Text-4-Baby Health Info Links

How do you talk about perinatal mood and anxiety disorders in your classes?  What activities do you do to convey this information effectively?  Do you bring up this topic again at the childbirth class reunions you attend?  Can you share what works well for you so that we can all learn?  What have your experiences been in helping women and their partners to be knowledgeable and informed? What do you do to be sure that every day is Maternal Mental Health Awareness Day?

 

Babies, Birth Trauma, Breastfeeding, Childbirth Education, Depression, Infant Attachment, Maternal Mental Health, Paternal Postnatal Depression, Perinatal Mood Disorders, Postpartum Depression , , , , , , , , , ,