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Critical Congenital Heart Defect Screening – A Simple Newborn Test that Saves Lives

April 24th, 2014 by avatar

 By Elias Kass, ND, CPM, LM

© Tammi Johnson

© Tammi Johnson

Critical Congenital Heart Defect screening can help identify and save the lives of newborns born with previously undetected but serious malformations of the heart that can significantly impact them as they transition to life on the outside.  Families can learn about the simple screening procedure in a childbirth education class and be prepared to discuss the screening with their health care providers.  Dr. Elias Kass, naturopath and midwife, shares information on the screening, stats on the incidence of CCHDs and how you can help spread the word on the importance of all newborns being screened. – Sharon Muza, Community Manager, Science & Sensibility 

There’s a new newborn screening being implemented in many birth settings – critical congenital heart defect screening, or CCHD. What is this screening? What does it look for, and how can you educate and prepare your childbirth education students for the screening and possible results?

Critical congenital heart defects refer to heart defects that babies are born with and that require surgical intervention within the first month (or year, depending on the defining organization). About 1 in 100 babies have heart defects (1%), and about 1 in 4 of those with a heart defect have a defect so severe that it needs to be corrected immediately (0.25% of all babies) Only some of these defects will be picked up by prenatal ultrasound, and they may not show up on exam before the baby goes home (or the midwife leaves in the case of a home birth). Depending on the defect, some babies may be able to compensate with structures that were in place during the fetal period but begin to go away after the baby is born.

Fetal circulation and changes after birth

By KellyPhD (Own work) [CC-BY-SA-3.0], via Wikimedia Commons

By KellyPhD (Own work) [CC-BY-SA-3.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Because a fetus receives oxygen through the placenta and umbilical cord, there’s no need for him to send a significant amount of blood to the lungs, so a fetus has very different heart and lung circulation than they will after making the transition to life on the outside. One of the big differences (simplified for this article) is the ductus arteriosis – this is a bypass that takes blood from the pulmonary artery and provides a shortcut to the aorta, instead of continuing on to the lungs. Another big difference is the foramen ovale – this is an oval-shaped window between the right atrium and left atrium, which allows blood to bypass being pumped out to the lungs entirely. After birth, pressure changes cause massive changes in flow. Pressure increases in the left atrium cause a flap to slam shut across the foramen ovale. Blood also finds it easier to flow to the lungs, so less blood flows through the ductus arteriosus. Over the course of days and weeks, the foramen ovale seals shut and the ductus arteriosus starts to shrivel.

Typically blood being pumped out to the body is loaded with oxygen. If there are structural problems, it’s possible that this blood would be a mix of oxygenated and deoxygenated blood – there would be less oxygen available in this blood, but at least it’s getting out to the body. Sometimes those fetal structures are what allows that mixed blood to circulate. So what if the baby was really depending on those shortcuts and bypasses? And then the shortcuts and bypasses go away? These babies may look well and do fine, until the fetal structures start to go away.

This March of Dimes article describes seven conditions considered to be part of CCHD:

  1. Hypoplastic left heart syndrome (also called HLHS)
  2. Pulmonary atresia (also called PA)
  3. Tetralogy of Fallot (also called TOF)
  4. Total anomalous pulmonary venous return (also called TAPV or TAPVR)
  5. Transposition of the great arteries (also called TGA)
  6. Tricuspid atresia (also called TA)
  7. Truncus arteriosis

See page for author [GFDL or CC-BY-SA-3.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Circulation after birth [GFDL or CC-BY-SA-3.0], via Wikimedia Commons

CCHD screening of the newborn is intended to catch babies who might need intervention, before they decompensate and their heart defects are made obvious.

The screening process

CCHD screening involves using a pulse oximeter at two locations — the right hand (or wrist), and either foot. The right arm receives its blood supply before the ductus arteriosus enters the aorta, so it’s known as “pre-ductal.” The left hand and the lower body receive “post-ductal” blood.

The pulse oximeter senses oxygen saturation by shining light through the skin. Red blood cells that are loaded with oxygen deflect light differently than red blood cells without oxygen. The opposite sensor collects the light and calculates how much was lost. By using multiple wavelengths of light, the unit can isolate arterial flow and disregard venous flow (veins return blood to the heart after the tissues have ‘used’ the oxygen the blood was carrying). For babies, an adhesive probe is typically wrapped around the hand or wrist, and then around a foot. The thin strip might be covered with a foam band to help block out the room light. Some facilities use reusable probes that are more like clips. Not all pulse oximeters are well suited for this purpose – they need to be able to sense low saturations and not be confused by an infant’s constant motion.

There are three possible results from the screening – pass, fail, and an in between, or “try again.”

If a baby’s oxygen saturation is ≥ 95% in the right hand and foot, and there is less than a 3% difference between the two readings, then she passes the screening.

For a baby whose saturation is between 90-95%, or has a greater than 3% difference between the right hand and foot, the screening test is repeated in an hour. If she still doesn’t pass or fail, she can have one more chance. If she still doesn’t pass after three tries (one initial and two retries), that’s considered a fail, and she should be evaluated.

If a baby’s oxygen saturation is under 90% in either the right hand or foot, or she didn’t pass in three tries, this is considered a fail, or a positive screening. This baby should be referred to a pediatric cardiologist who can assess her and do an echocardiogram (ultrasound of the heart), and/or other workup. Depending on her health at the time, that might mean an immediate consult, or it might mean having her scheduled for a visit soon.

In Washington state, Seattle Children’s Hospital and the other regional pediatric cardiology groups are available to talk with the clinician who has a patient with a problematic screening and help figure out when and where the baby should be seen. If there is no local pediatric cardiology group, some cardiology groups can do telemetry or read studies remotely. Before implementing screening in their practice or facility, there should be a clear process for how to obtain consultation and referral (who should be called, how to contact them, how to transmit images if able, etc). Evaluation should be arranged before the baby is discharged because a baby’s condition can deteriorate rapidly.

There are tools available to help with this algorithm. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has a flow chart to help guide the screening process, and Children’s Health Care of Atlanta has a web site and Pulse Ox Tool app to help guide providers.

When should the screening be done?

The screening should be done between 24-48 hours after birth. Before 24 hours, there is an increased incidence of false positives, but a baby who passes before 24 hours is still considered to have passed (i.e., it still “counts”). If a baby is being discharged before 24 hours, the recommendation is to do it as close to discharge as possible. For babies born at home, this screening should be done at the 24-48 hour home visit, along with the metabolic screening. For the screening to be most accurate, baby should be awake and calm, but not feeding. (Feeding causes some decrease in oxygen saturation even in normal term newborns.)

What about a failed screen?

It’s helpful to know that not all babies with a failed screen have a critical congenital heart defect. Like all screening tools, this screening has false positives. The false positive rate overall is about 1/200 (0.5%), but it falls to 1/2000 (.05%) when the screening is performed after 24 hours of age according to the FAQ on the Seattle Children’s Hospital Pulse Oximetry Screening for Newborns resource page for providers. About a quarter of the babies who fail the screening truly have a Critical Congenital Heart Defect(true positive), while half have condition that causes low blood oxygen, like pneumonia and sepsis, and a quarter are well (false positive).

Who should be screened?

All babies should be screened, unless the baby is already known to have a critical congenital heart defect, identified during ultrasounds done during the pregnancy or immediately after birth. Most states mandate screening – 31 by legislation and one by executive order. An additional six states have regulations or guidance. In states without mandated screenings, most birth settings have adopted the screening, but not all. For some settings there are logistical challenges in terms of purchasing equipment (particularly independent midwives who might not have other use for the pulse oximeter, although since it was recommended to be used as part of neonatal resuscitation that has begun to change), arranging for consultation (particularly in rural areas or regions without adequate pediatric cardiology support), or logistical challenges in terms of who will do the screening and when. The Secretary of Health and Human Services (HHS) has recommended that CCHD screening be added to the newborn screening panel (like metabolic screening and hearing screening). The American Academy of Pediatrics also supports the universal adoption of this screening.

Cost can be a barrier in offering this screening. There is currently no procedure (CPT) code for this screening, and insurance companies are generally bundling it into the general newborn care (and not reimbursing for it as a separate service), though there are groups working to change this, since there is significant up-front investment and on-going costs in terms of probes and staff time to provide the screening. Most appropriate pulse oximeters start at $500 and the disposable probes around $3-5. Using reusable probes can decrease the cost of providing this screening.

If the hospital or midwife doesn’t provide this screening, parents can ask their pediatric provider to perform the screening at the baby’s first office visit. The goal is to catch these conditions as quickly as possible, ideally before the baby’s condition decompensates. Getting a screening a little later is better than not getting it at all.The screening is no less accurate later on.

The childbirth educator perspective

As a childbirth educator, you can share information about this quick screening test, when you discuss other newborn care procedures. You can encourage your students to ask their midwife or doctor about the screening, or ask on the hospital tour. If the hospital or health care provider hasn’t yet implemented this screening, families can ask why not, and if there’s anyone they can talk to encourage implementation. Facilities and providers should hear from families that they know about this screening and expect it as part of their newborn’s care.  Universal screening will go a long way to identifying those children who were not previously diagnosed with a Critical Congenital Heart Defect and who can begin to receive care for the CCHD as soon as possible by pediatric cardiologists.  Your childbirth class may be the only opportunity for these families to hear about and understand the importance of the CCHD screening test.

Are you already talking about this screening test for CCHD in your classes? If not, might you begin to share this information as a result of what you learned today?  Are providers and facilities in your area already offering this test as part of normal newborn screening? Do you know any families who have had this screening and their baby was diagnosed with an heart defect? Share your experiences in our comments and let’s discuss.- SM

References and Resources

March of Dimes, with general information about CCHD screening targeted towards families
American Academy of Pediatrics - detailed information about screening and implementation, targeted towards providers and facilities
Dr. Amy Schultz (a pediatric cardiologist at Seattle Children’s) frequently presents on CCHD screening – this presentation, with detailed information about critical congenital heart defects and screening, was recorded and can be streamed online

About Dr. Elias Kass

elias kass head shot

Elias Kass, ND, LM, CPM

Elias Kass, ND, LM, CPM, is a naturopathic physician and licensed midwife practicing as part of One Sky Family Medicine in Seattle, Washington. He provides integrative family primary care for children and their parents, including prenatal, birth and pediatric care. He loves working with babies! Practice information and Dr Kass’s contact info is available at One Sky Family Medicine.

Babies, Childbirth Education, Guest Posts, Neonatology, Newborns , , , , ,

Preparing Mothers for Breastfeeding after a Cesarean – The Educator’s Role

April 22nd, 2014 by avatar

By Tamara Hawkins, RN, MSN, FNP, IBCLC, CHHC, LCCE

© Sharon Muza

© Sharon Muza

April is Cesarean Awareness Month (CAM).  In a post earlier this month, I shared my favorite websites for birth professionals to learn and share with students and clients about cesarean prevention, recovery, vaginal birth after cesarean along with a fun quiz to test your knowledge about cesarean and VBAC information.  Today, as Lamaze International continues to recognize CAM, LCCE and IBCLC Tamara Hawkins shares information on how professionals can help prepare women who will be breastfeeding after a cesarean to get off on the right track for a successful breastfeeding relationship. – Sharon Muza, Science & Sensibility Community Manager.

Working in New York City,  I see many women who have given birth to their babies via cesarean section. Most hospitals in my area have a cesarean rate close to 40% and 30% of those births are primary cesareans.  April is Cesarean Awareness Month and I wanted to discuss cesarean birth and breastfeeding.  As both a Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator and an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant, I work with women both before and after a cesarean birth.  I meet mothers who could have prevented many lactation issues if equipped with a few practices to get breastfeeding off to a good start after a cesarean birth. I want to share some practical teaching tips on preparing a mother to successfully breastfeed after having a cesarean birth. In a childbirth class,  it is important to give anticipatory guidance to mothers in class who are preparing to birth about the realities of breastfeeding after a cesarean.

I recommend discussing breastfeeding after cesarean births in all portions of your childbirth class; labor and birth, newborn care and breastfeeding classes, in order to cover different aspects of breastfeeding initiation.  During the labor and birth variations class, discuss how cesarean births affect baby and mother physically and emotionally. Provide tips on how to get through the first days in the hospital such as skin to skin, rooming in, explain the normalcy of cluster feeding and give breastfeeding support resources for the mother to use once she returns home. I find giving a wealth of well researched information in class will not help a mother who may be having breastfeeding trouble several weeks later after the baby has arrived. In newborn care and/or breastfeeding class, provide additional details: latch, positioning, signs of hunger, feeding length and times, cluster feedings, care for engorgement and sore nipples. Supplement with your list of resources.

Many birth professionals report cesarean births as a common reason for delayed Lactogenesis I. I like to lay out solutions for common concerns and problems that arise for mothers when breastfeeding after a cesarean. These solutions include care for the areola/nipple complex, swelling, positioning and latch techniques, anticipating frequent feedings, feeding a sleepy baby, and caring for engorged breasts.

Solutions and Teaching Points

Insufficient glandular tissue and low milk supply

I have seen an explosion of mothers who have insufficient glandular tissue and low milk supply. During class discussions about baby’s first feeding, explain normal breast changes to expect during pregnancy such as prominent veining, dark areola/nipple complex, growth of about one cup size in breast tissue, and tenderness. These changes indicate the process of Lactogenesis Stage I – when the epithelial cells of the breasts begin to convert to milk secreting cells under the influence of the hormone prolactin. When mothers have no or very little breast growth during pregnancy this indicates a deficiency in stage I of lactogenesis. Often, this is why a mother may have trouble with milk supply and not just because she had a cesarean. It is important we make a distinction in this for the mother because if the mother is blaming herself for an unplanned cesarean and then believes the cesarean birth caused the low milk supply it can cause undue distress. I typically just present the expected breast growth information and state, “If you have not had any changes, feel free to reach out to me or speak with your health care provider about your concerns.” When a mother is empowered with anticipatory guidance, it can help her make solutions to adequately feed her baby at birth, build her milk supply and find appropriate breastfeeding support. Even if she has a cesarean, she should not expect low milk supply unless she has the markers of IGT.

Creative positioning and latch techniques

© http://flic.kr/p/5f29EK

© http://flic.kr/p/5f29EK

We cannot expect a mother to sit straight up in a chair to nurse after a cesarean and we have to model positions to help mothers understand how to nurse laying back, in football positions and cross cradle. The side lying position for mothers who gave birth by cesarean can be hard as the mother can experience pulling on her incision as she is trying to roll on to her side.  Additionally, as she is laying in the side lying position, there can be pain, and some babies’ legs are long and can kick the incision. Depending on the available space where I teach, I can get on the floor and demonstrate how to hold the baby in multiple positions simulating being in a bed. I also discourage the use of “breastfeeding pillows.” They tend to not fit well around a mother in bed. If a mother is in a chair she’s liable to lean too far over to reach the baby who is resting on the pillow. It’s best to teach good posture in classes to prevent maternal back and neck discomfort and demonstrate having the baby up close to mother’s abdomen and breast to affect a deep latch.

Frequent feeding

Parents will receive many “tips” about breastfeeding after a cesarean delivery. Every nurse, health care provider, lactation consultant/counselor, mother, sister and friend will tell her something different about when to feed her baby. It is the role of the childbirth educator to prepare them for frequent feeds and give rationales as to why feeding a baby frequently is important.  Rather than stating a set “frequency” such as feed every 2-3 hours, I want them to understand the newborn’s normal pattern of sleep and wakefulness and how this influences their feeding behaviors. Mothers may be drowsy after a cesarean birth, particularly if the surgery followed a long labor.  They may also be in pain. Pain medication, while necessary for good pain management after surgery, can also contribute to a mother feeling sleepy. Holding her baby skin to skin will help the mother connect with her baby and relax. Both mother and baby need to be relaxed to get breastfeeding off to a good start. Explain to mothers during class that babies may want to nurse within the first hour and to wait for those cues: rooting, hands to mouth and suckling. Babies are often sleepy after cesarean births, especially if mother was pushing, had been treated with magnesium for pre-eclampsia or had been through a long induction. When a baby does not feed as often as anticipated, this will of course upset the mother and can lead to delayed Lactogenesis II.

Educators have to set expectations properly. Working on a time line, I discuss, breastfeeding in the operating room during the cesarean repair and in the recovery room. When partners are in class, teach them how to place the baby skin to skin with mom and support the baby if the mother’s arms or hands are restricted with blood pressure cuffs and IV lines. Discuss hand expression for those sleepy babies who are not rooting within 45 minutes of birth. Dr Jane Morton has a fantastic video illustrating how to express colostrum by hand. This is especially important for babies born to a mother with gestational diabetes, as these babies tend to be at risk for low blood sugar and formula supplementation.

If the baby has to go to the nursery before breastfeeding has been established, we discuss delaying the newborn bath and the rationale. When babies get a bath, not only is the vernix and amniotic fluid (which is a familiar taste to the baby) washed off, the baby will most likely cry, a lot, and fall into a deep sleep making it harder to wake for a feeding. Also, many babies are kept for a longer time in the nursery to warm up after the bath delaying skin to skin and breastfeeding. If the baby has not breastfed in the operating or recovery room, suggest the parents ask for the bath to be delayed until the next day and expect the baby to be on contact precautions. That means there may be a sign on the bassinet alerting care providers to wear gloves when caring for the baby.

Moving along the timeline, we move right into newborn sleep-wake patterns and cluster feedings. I tell them the baby is not born knowing there is a clock on the wall. There is no magic formula that says the baby should be fed 8x/day or every 3 hours or even for 15 minutes on the breast. Expect the baby to nurse 45 minutes every hour for four to five hours straight. That’s when you will really get their attention and can again discuss normal baby routines, colostrum volumes and the size of the newborn stomach.

Dealing with a sleepy baby

Babies born via cesarean can be sleepy for many reasons; exposure to magnesium sulfate and analgesia, long labors, and long second stage to name a few reasons. These babies need to be fed one way or another. Teach clients how to hand express and feed their baby at the breast. Holding the baby close to the breast, hand express 20 drops from each breast and rotate twice between each breast. Approximately 80 drops equal a teaspoon. This is the estimated amount the baby will take in during breastfeedings on day one and two of life. The mother can hand express directly into the baby’s mouth or into a spoon. I prefer a soft baby spoon as a plastic spoon can be sharp on the edges. Hand expression can prevent serious engorgement and increase likelihood of normal Lactogenesis II by stimulating release of prolactin.

Dealing with engorgement

Mothers that get engorged after a cesarean sometimes are dealing with breasts that are extremely edematous. It is important to discuss the difference of being engorged with milk versus engorged with interstitial fluid or swelling. At the time I cover the topic of cesareans in the childbirth class, I differentiate the two by describing how the breasts feel under both circumstances. I describe the breasts as feeling like a bag of marbles when it is full of breast milk and like an overfilled water balloon when it is just interstitial fluid. The care plan for each type of engorgement is a bit different. To start, emphasize on demand feedings to prevent buildup of fluid and discuss the use of Reverse Pressure Softening to remove local swelling in the areolar/nipple complex to affect a deep latch.

Breasts that appear swollen and feel soft like a water balloon need hand expression to get the milk flowing and to keep the areola soft. No application of heat is warranted with this type of swelling. Warm compresses can cause blood and lymphatic vessels in the breast to dilate and release more fluid. The goal is to reduce the swelling. After every feeding, application of cool compresses to the breasts is best. Cold therapy slows circulation, reducing inflammation, muscle spasm, and pain. The goal here is to keep the areola soft to prevent pressure building up around the milk ducts and prevention of milk flow.

Breasts that are hard with palpable alveoli are full of milk. The mother can once again use hand expression to get the milk flowing and will benefit from warm compresses to the breast for about 5-10 minutes before feeding. If her milk begins to leak, than the warmth is a good tool. If the milk does not begin to leak out, that is an indication that interstitial swelling is present and heat should not be used. Only cool compresses after feeding and/or pumping should be used in this situation.

Mothers that have cesarean births are very vulnerable to the hardships that come along 3-4 days after the birth including sore and swollen breasts, possible low milk supply and general recovery complaints that are associated with major abdominal surgery. Giving anticipatory guidance to succeed with breastfeeding amongst these possible issues and challenges are important to help mothers gain the confidence to succeed in making breastfeeding work.

After birth, a mother may have less support in her postpartum room and at home. She may even be alone most of the time during breastfeeding. After her labor and birth, it is likely she will not be able to access information stored in the left side of her brain if she is having breastfeeding difficulties coupled with fatigue and pain from birth. She will still reach out and ask questions. Very likely her first sources will be an online chat room, on a Facebook page or on a website somewhere. Childbirth educators should provide specific resources to find breastfeeding information. Share local breastfeeding and cesarean birth support groups along with the contact information for breastfeeding professionals during your childbirth classes.

I recognize that there is a lot of work to do in the birth world to bring down the cesarean birth from the current 32.8%. We can inform our students and clients with information to keep breastfeeding as normal as possible if a cesarean birth should occurred. It is our responsibility in the classroom to give our clients those tools to help them succeed in breastfeeding no matter how they give birth.

What information do you share with your clients about cesarean birth and successful breastfeeding? How do you prepare them for possible breastfeeding hurdles after a cesarean birth?

About Tamara Hawkins

tamara hawkins head shotTamara Hawkins, RN, MSN, FNP, IBCLC, CHHC, LCCE is the director of Stork and Cradle, Inc offering Prenatal Education and Breastfeeding Support. She graduated with a BSN from New York University and a MSN from SUNY Downstate Medical Center. She is a Family Nurse Practitioner and has worked with mothers and babies for the past 16 years at various NYC medical centers and the Elizabeth Seton Childbearing Center. Tamara has been certified to teach childbirth classes since 1999 and in 2004 became a Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator and an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant.  Follow Tamara on Twitter: @TamaraFNP_IBCLC

Babies, Breastfeeding, Cesarean Birth, Childbirth Education, Guest Posts, Healthy Care Practices, Infant Attachment, Newborns , , , , , ,

The Best Practice Guidelines: Transfer from Home Birth to Hospital – Collaboration Can Improve Outcomes

April 17th, 2014 by avatar

 By Lawrence Leeman, MD, MPH and Diane Holzer, LM, CPM, PA-C

© http://www.mybirth.com.au/

© http://www.mybirth.com.au/

On Tuesday, readers learned about the history and objectives of the Home Birth Consensus Summit, a collective of stakeholders, whose goal is to improve maternal infant health outcomes and increase collaboration between all those involved in serving women who are planning home births.  The interdisciplinary collaboration that occurs during the Summits brings representatives from many different perspectives to the table in order to improve the birth process for women and babies. You may want to start with the post “Finding Common Ground: The Home Birth Consensus Summit“ and then enjoy today’s post on the Home Birth Consensus Summit’s just released “The Best Practice Guidelines: Transfer from Home Birth to Hospital.”  Today’s post was written by Dr. Lawrence Leeman and Midwife Diane Holzer, two of the members on the HBCS Collaboration Task Force, a subgroup tasked with developing these transfer guidelines.  Share your thoughts on these new guidelines and your opinion on if you feel that they will improve safety and outcomes for mothers and babies. – Sharon Muza, Community Manager, Science & Sensibility

Leea Brady was a second-time mother whose first baby was born at home. One day past her due date, an ultrasound revealed high levels of amniotic fluid, which can pose a risk during delivery. Although she planned to have her baby at home, on the advice of her midwife, Leea transferred to her local hospital.

“I knew that we needed to be in the hospital in case anything went wrong,” said Brady. “I was really surprised when I arrived and the hospital staff told me they had read my birth plan, and they would do everything they could to honor our intentions for the birth. My midwife was able to stay throughout the birth, which meant a lot, because I had a trusting relationship with her. She clearly had good relationships with the hospital staff, and they worked together as a team.”

A recent descriptive study (Cheyney, 2014) reports that about ten percent of women who plan home births transfer to the hospital after the onset of labor. The reason for the overwhelming majority of transfers are the need for labor augmentation and other non-emergent issues. Brady’s transfer from a planned home birth to the hospital represents the ideal: good communication and coordination between providers in different settings, minimizing the potential for negative outcomes.

However, in some communities, lack of trust and poor communication between clinicians during the transfer have jeopardized the physical and emotional well being of the family, and been frustrating for both transferring and receiving providers. Lack of role clarity and poor communication across disciplines have been linked to preventable adverse neonatal and maternal outcomes, including death.(Guise, 2013,Cornthwaite, 2008) With optimal communication and cooperation among health care providers, though, families often report high satisfaction, despite not being in the location of their choice.

Recent national initiatives have been directed at improving interprofessional collaboration in maternity care.(Vedam, 2014) This is why a multi-disciplinary working group of leaders from obstetrics, family medicine, pediatrics, midwifery, and consumer groups came together to form a set of guidelines for transfer from home to hospital. The Best Practice Guidelines: Transfer from Planned Home Birth to Hospital are being officially launched today by the Home Birth Consensus Summit and will be highlighted at a series of upcoming presentations at conferences and health care facilities.

The authors of the guidelines, known as the Home Birth Summit Collaboration Task Force, formed as a result of their work together at the Home Birth Summits.

© http://flic.kr/p/3mcESR

© http://flic.kr/p/3mcESR

“Some hospital based providers are fearful of liability concerns, or they are unfamiliar with the credentials and the training of home birth providers,” said Dr. Timothy Fisher, MD, MS, at the Hubbard Center for Women’s Health in Keene, NH and an Adjunct Assistant Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Dartmouth Medical School. “But families are going to choose home birth, for a variety of cultural and personal beliefs. These guidelines are the first of their kind to provide a template for hospitals and home birth providers to come together with clearly defined expectations.”

The guidelines provide a roadmap for maternity care organizations developing policies around the transfer from home to hospital. They are also appropriate for transfer from a free-standing birth center to hospital.

The guidelines include model practices for the midwife and the hospital staff. Some guidelines include the efficient transfer of records and information, a shared-decision making process among hospital staff and the transferring family, and ongoing involvement of the transferring midwife as appropriate.

“When the family sees that their midwife trusts and respects the doctor receiving care, that trust is transferred to the new provider,” said Dr. Ali Lewis, a member of the HBCS Collaboration Task Force. She became involved with the work of the committee in part because of her experiences with a transfer that was not handled optimally. “It is rare that transfers come in as true emergency. But when they do, if the midwife can tell the family she trusts my decisions, then I can get consent much more quickly, which results in better care and higher patient satisfaction.”

The guidelines also encourage hospital providers and staff to be sensitive to the psychosocial needs of the woman that result from the change of birth setting.

“When families enter into the hospital and feel as if things are being done to them as opposed to with them, they feel like a victim in the process,” said Diane Holzer, LM, CPM, PA-C, and the chair of the HBCS Collaboration Task Force. “When families are incorporated in the decision-making process, and feel as if their baby and their body is being respected, they leave the hospital describing a positive experience, even though it wasn’t what they had planned.”

The guidelines are open source, meaning that hospitals and practices can use or adapt any part of the guidelines. The Home Birth Summit delegates welcome endorsements of the guidelines from organizations, institutions, health care providers, and other stakeholders.

References

Cornthwaite, K., Edwards, S., & Siassakos, D. (2013). Reducing risk in maternity by optimising teamwork and leadership: an evidence-based approach to save mothers and babies. Best Practice & Research Clinical Obstetrics & Gynaecology, 27(4), 571-581.

Cheyney, M., Bovbjerg, M., Everson, C., Gordon, W., Hannibal, D., & Vedam, S. (2014). Outcomes of Care for 16,924 Planned Home Births in the United States: The Midwives Alliance of North America Statistics Project, 2004 to 2009. Journal of Midwifery & Women’s Health.

Guise, J. M., & Segel, S. (2008). Teamwork in obstetric critical care. Best Practice & Research Clinical Obstetrics & Gynaecology, 22(5), 937-951.

Vedam S, Leeman L, Cheyney M, Fisher T, Myers S, Low L, Ruhl C. Transfer from planned home birth to hospital: inter-professional collaboration leads to quality improvement . Journal of Midwifery and Women’s Health, November 2014, In Press.

About the Authors:

leeman larry headshotDr. Lawrence Leeman, MD, MPH/Medical Director, Maternal Child Health, received his degree from University of California, San Francisco in 1988 and completed residency training in Family Medicine at UNM. He practiced rural Family Medicine at the Zuni/Ramah Indian Health Service Hospital for six years. He subsequently earned a fellowship in Obstetrics. He is board certified in Family Medicine. He directs the Family Medicine Maternal and Child Health service and fellowship and co-medical director of the UNM Hospital Mother-Baby Unit. Dr. Leeman practices the family medicine with a special interest in the care of pregnant women and newborns. He is Medical Director of the Milagro Program that provides prenatal care and maternity care services to women with substance abuse problems. Dr. Leeman is a Professor in the Departments of Family & Community Medicine, and Obstetrics and Gynecology. He is currently the Managing Editor for the nationwide Advanced Life Support in Obstetrics (ALSO) program. Areas of research include rural maternity care, pelvic floor outcomes after childbirth, family planning, and vaginal birth after cesarean (VBAC). Clinic: Family Medicine Center

Diane Holzer head shotDiane Holzer, LM, CPM, PA-C, has been a practicing midwife for over 30 years with experience in both home and birth center. She was one of the founding women who passionately created an infrastructure for the integration of home birth midwifery into the system. She sat on the Certification Task Force which led to the CPM credential and also was a board member of the Midwifery Education and Accreditation council for 13 years. She served the Midwives Alliance of North America on the board for 20 years and is the chair of the International Section being the liaison to the International Confederation of Midwives. Diane is the Chair of the Collaboration Task Force of the Home Birth Summit and currently has a home birth practice and works as a Physician Assistant doing primary health care in a rural Family Practice clinic.

Babies, Guest Posts, Home Birth, informed Consent, Maternal Mortality, Maternal Quality Improvement, Maternity Care, Midwifery, Newborns, Practice Guidelines, Transforming Maternity Care , , , , , , , ,

Finding Common Ground: The Home Birth Consensus Summit

April 15th, 2014 by avatar
© HBCS

© HBCS

While home birth has a proven safety record in countries outside the U.S., some attribute that to the fact that, in other countries, home birth takes place in the context of an integrated health care system. It is critical that all of the stakeholders in the maternal health care system are working together to ensure safe birth options in the U.S. as well.

The Home Birth Consensus Summit (HBCS) is a unique collaboration of all of the stakeholders currently involved in home birth in the United States. First held in 2011, the Home Birth Consensus Summit offers physicians, midwives, consumers, administrators and policy makers; (a varied group of representatives who do not often share common ground,) a chance to take a 360 degree look at the current maternal health care system and tease out the areas of conflict and common ground in order to increase safety in all birth settings.

Today on Science & Sensibility, our readers learn about the Home Birth Consensus Summit; its participants, purpose and process. Thursday, we will have the opportunity to review one of the groundbreaking products from the past two summits, when the HBCS releases the “Best Practice Guidelines: Transfer from Home Birth to Hospital” for consideration and adoption by maternal health organizations. Learn more about the HBCS from Summit Delegate Jeanette McCulloch as she interviews Saraswathi Vedam, RM FACNM MSN Sci D(hc), Home Birth Consensus Summit convener and chair. – Sharon Muza, Community Manager, Science & Sensibility

Jeanette McCulloch: What was the motivation behind launching the Home Birth Consensus Summit?

Saraswathi Vedam: Women want – and deserve – respectful, high quality maternity care regardless of their planned place of birth. Women and their families are not served by the interprofessional conflict and confusion that occurs in many regions in the US around place of birth.

While there may be points of disagreement, I know from numerous conversations with consumers, midwives, physicians, administrators, and policy makers that there are many more areas in maternity care where we all share a common set of principles and goals. Everyone is committed to working towards improved quality and safety for women and infants.

In 2011, a very intentionally selected group of stakeholders came together for the first Summit at the Airlie Center, in Warrenton, VA. These individuals represented all key leaders of the maternity care team, researchers, policy makers, payors, consumers, and consumer advocates. They came to the Summit with a wide variety of perspectives – including those for and against planned home birth. At the Summit, these delegates engaged in a unique process designed to help those with opposing viewpoints untangle complex issues. This process, called Future Search, guided the group through a complete exploration of every aspect of the maternal health care system. There were frank, challenging, and productive conversations, often among stakeholders who rarely, if ever, had been at the same table before. Once we were able to discover common ground, we were able to create a realistic and achievable strategic action plan together.

JM: Tell us about what common ground the Home Birth Consensus Summit has found so far.

SV:  As the delegates discussed their shared responsibilities and vision for providing the best possible care, we realized that the vision applied to all birth settings. The nine common ground statements describe a maternity care environment that respects the woman’s autonomy, ensuring she has safe access to qualified providers in all settings, and that the whole team that may care for her are well prepared with the clinical skills and knowledge that best applies to her specific situation. This will require attention to equity, cross-professional education, and research that includes the woman in defining the elements of “safety” and accurately describes the effects of birth place, or different models of care, on outcomes. The delegates shared a goal of increasing knowledge and access to physiologic birth, access to professional education and systems for quality monitoring for all types of midwives, from all communities; and reduction in barriers like cost and liability. Coming to this place of understanding and agreement, though, was only the beginning. Each of those action statements had to be turned into a concrete action plan that all of the stakeholders collaborated on developing.

© HBCS

© HBCS

JM: What is happening with the common ground statements now?

SV: Multi-disciplinary work groups have formed around each common ground statement. In 2013, the work groups came together for the second summit, again at the Airlie Center, to discuss progress made so far and tackle challenges.

Coming to this place of understanding and agreement, though, was only the beginning. The common ground statements are also encouraging a dialogue outside of our action groups that we could have never predicted. For example, the statements were read into the congressional record by Congresswoman Roybal-Allard, who said that the publication of the Home Birth Consensus document was “of critical importance to all current and future childbearing families in this country.” In the following year, several of the Summit delegates were invited panelists and presenters at an Institute of Medicine Workshop on Research Issues in the Assessment of Birth Settings.

JM: What are some of the top outcomes of the work groups?

SV: One exciting outcome – a set of Best Practice Guidelines to provide optimal care for mothers and families transferring from home to hospital – will be released by the Home Birth Consensus Summit later this week. This project represents what the Summits are all about: bringing together stakeholders to look at every facet of an issue, and work together on concrete initiatives to improve outcomes. These guidelines are based on the best available research on effective interprofessional collaboration. Delegates who are leading midwives, physicians, nurses, policy makers and consumers from across the U.S. formed the Collaboration Task Force. They met regularly over eight months on weekends and after hours to research and carefully design a concrete evidence-based tool to improve quality and safety for women and increase respectful communication among providers. Easing the friction that can sometimes occur when families arrive at the hospital can not only increase safety for families, but also build trust and collaboration between providers.

© HBCS

© HBCS

Another group is collaborating to develop a Best Practice Regulation and Licensure Toolkit – a resource for state policy makers that will provide a best practice model of midwifery regulation to be used as a template to enact or improve licensure in a particular state.

Another important outcome is a study of midwives and mothers of color to better understand social and health care inequities that lead to higher incidence of prematurity and low birth weight.

JM: What comes next for the Summit?

SV: The action groups are continuing their work on initiatives in each of the common ground areas. At Summit III, scheduled for Fall 2014 in Seattle, WA, each action work group will share the products of their collaborations, and address some remaining priorities. These include research and data collection, ethics, and access to equitable care during pregnancy. We plan to expand the participants to include more leaders from policy and practice to disseminate the documents and engage more in this exciting work.

I have been working towards ensuring equitable birth options for women and their families for nearly 30 years. My goal for the Summits is to increase the probability that my four daughters – and everyone’s daughters, wives, and sisters – will experience high quality, respectful maternity care.

What are your thoughts on the Home Birth Consensus Summits and this collaborative model?  How do you see this further maternal infant health and safety.  What would you like to see discussed by the stakeholders at Summit III in Seattle this fall?  Let us know in the comments and join us on Thursday to learn more about the details of the soon to be released “Best Practice Guidelines: Transfer from Home Birth to Hospital.”

Bios:

© Saraswathi Vedam

© Saraswathi Vedam

Saraswathi Vedam, RM FACNM MSN Sci D(hc), is the convener and chair of the Home Birth Consensus Summit. She has been active in setting national and international policy on home birth and midwifery education and regulation, providing expert consultations in Mexico, Hungary, Chile, China, Canada, and the United States. She serves as Senior Advisor to the MANA Division of Research, Chair of the ACNM Transfer Task Force, and Executive Board Member, Canadian Association of Midwifery Educators. Over the past 28 years she has cared for families in all birth settings. Professor Vedam’s scholarly work includes critical appraisal of the literature on planned home birth, and development of the first US registry of home birth perinatal data. Contact Saraswathi Vedam.

© Jeanette McCulloch

© Jeanette McCulloch

Jeanette McCulloch, IBCLC, is the co-founder of BirthSwell an organization improving infant and maternal health by changing the way we talk about birth and breastfeeding. She has been using strategic communications and messaging to change policy, spread new ideas, and build thriving businesses for more than 20 years. Jeanette is honored to be working with local, national, and international birth and breastfeeding organizations (including the Home Birth Consensus Summit) and advocates ensuring that women have access to high-quality care and information.

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April is Cesarean Awareness Month – Resources and a Test Your Knowledge Quiz

April 10th, 2014 by avatar

fb profile cam 2014April is Cesarean Awareness Month, an event meant to direct the American public’s attention to the United States’ high cesarean rate. 32.8% of all birthing women gave birth by cesarean in 2012. A cesarean delivery can be a life-saving procedure when used appropriately, but it takes one’s breath away when you consider that one third of all women birthing underwent major abdominal surgery in order to birth their babies.

Professionals that work with women during the childbearing year can be a great resource for women, pointing them to evidence based information, support groups and organizations that offer non-biased information to help women lower their risk of cesarean surgery, receive support after a cesarean and work towards a trial of labor after a cesarean (TOLAC) and achieve a vaginal birth after a cesarean (VBAC) for subsequent births if appropriate.

Here are my top suggestions for websites and resources every birth professional should have on their short list to share with students and clients when it comes to cesarean awareness.

1. International Cesarean Awareness Network – an international organization with almost 200 volunteer led chapters, (most in the USA) offering peer to peer support for cesarean recovery and VBAC information by way of a website, e-newsletters, webinars, online forums, Facebook groups and monthly meetings in the community.

2. VBACFacts.com – Led by birth advocate Jen Kamel, this website is big on research and helps consumers and professionals alike understand the evidence and risks and benefits of both repeat cesareans and vaginal birth after cesarean, including vaginal birth after multiple cesareans.

3. Lamaze International’s “Push for Your Baby” – is a great resource for families to learn about the Six Healthy Care Practices, what evidence based care looks like and how to work with your health care provider to advocate for a safe and healthy birth. Also Lamaze has an wonderful infographic that can be shared online or printed.

4. Spinning Babies – Midwife Gail Tully really knows her stuff when it comes to helping babies navigate the pelvis during labor and birth. Many cesareans are conducted for “failure to progress” or “cephalopelvic disproportion” when really it is a case of a malpositioned baby who needed to be in a different position. This website is a wealth of information on what women can do to help their babies into the ideal position to be born, prenatally and during labor. It includes valuable information about helping a breech baby turn vertex. This is important, because finding a health care provider who will support vaginal breech birth is like finding a needle in a haystack.

© Patti Ramos Photography

© Patti Ramos Photography

5. Childbirth Connection – This website is a virtual goldmine of evidence based information about cesareans and VBACs including a valuable guide “What Every Pregnant Woman Needs to Know about Cesareans.” There are questions to ask a care provider and includes information on informed consent and informed refusal.

6. Cesareanrates.com is a great website run by Jill Arnold for those who love the numbers. Find out the cesarean rates of hospitals in your area. All the states are represented and families can use the information when searching out a provider and choosing a facility. Jill’s resource page on this site is full of useful information as well.

7. Safe Prevention of the Primary Cesarean –  The American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists along with the Society for Maternal Fetal Medicine recently published a groundbreaking document aimed at reducing the first cesarean. While fairly heavy reading, there is so much good information in this committee opinion that I believe every birth professional should at least take a peek. You may be pleasantly surprised.

Test your knowledge of the facts around cesareans and VBACs with this informative quiz:

As a birth professional, you can be a great resource for all your clients, helping them to prevent their first cesarean, providing support if they do birth by cesarean and assisting them on the journey to VBAC by pointing them to these valuable resources. You can make every day “Cesarean Awareness Day” for the families you work with, doing your part to help the pendulum to swing in the other direction, resulting in a reduction in our national cesarean rates and improving outcomes for mothers and babies. What are your favorite resources on the topic of cesareans and VBACs? Share with us in the comments section.
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