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Jazz It Up! Using Haiku Deck to Create Snappy Image-Based Presentations

March 3rd, 2015 by avatar

By Jocelyn Alt, CD(ToLabor), MBA

 My favorite way to teach is using interactive, engaging activities that get my families building community with each other, interacting with class members, actively partipating rather than passive listening and often up and out of their seats.  Sometimes, it does become necessary to use a presentation format to present a topic.  Alternately, using such a format can help reinforce one of the activities you are doing in class.  Today on Science & Sensibility, CBE and doula Jocelyn Alt shares a tool, Haiku Deck, that she uses to create interesting presentations to use in her childbirth classes.  Jocelyn reviews it here and shares some of her recent presentations. – Sharon Muza, Science & Sensibility Community Manager.

Some of my most rewarding moments as a childbirth educator are times when former participants share stories about using skills or information during their births that they learned in class. It might be a squatting position we practiced, the benefits and risks of narcotics as pain relief that we teach using an interactive game, or the BRAIN acronym for making informed decisions (see below if you are unfamiliar with this rubric.) My team of educators and I are always looking for new ways to make our classes more engaging and memorable so that our students will have a higher likelihood of recalling the information when they need it most – during labor.

Haiku Deck – reinforcing learning

It’s been known for eons that using images reinforces learning (it’s been said so often, the adage is hackneyed: “A picture is worth a thousand words.” But it’s often true!) So I was excited when I recently found out about a tool that allows you to create beautiful image-based slide presentations in a snap. It’s called Haiku Deck. Presentations created with this program can be used in conjunction with interactive activities as an introduction or backdrop, or alongside lecture components of class.

© Jocelyn Alt

© Jocelyn Alt

Here is an example of a presentation created with Haiku Deck: Top Five Tips for New Moms. If you click on the deck and view it on the Haiku Deck site, you can also see the notes that accompany each slide. After looking at the presentation, try testing its effectiveness on yourself. How many images do you remember from it? How many of the messages do you remember? How many do you think you would have remembered if you had simply seen them presented as text in a bulleted list?

Here’s another Haiku Deck for the acronym BRAIN: Five Essential Questions for Decision-Making in Labor, which I use to teach informed decision making. Each letter of the Screenshot 2015-03-02 16.22.22acronym stands for a question laboring parents can ask themselves and their care providers when faced with a decision in labor – or at any other time for that matter. One dad said that he found it so useful, he started using it as a decision-making tool at work! The acronym stands for Benefits, Risks, Alternatives, Intuition, and Need Time. Acronyms themselves can help with recall, and reinforcing them with images can make them even more sticky.

What I like about Haiku Deck

Ease of Use – The interface is elegant and simple to use.  One great feature is the huge library of images.  You just type in a word that relates to your content, and dozens of photos come up for your use.  With one click, you can add them to your presentation.

Effectiveness – The structure of Haiku Deck forces you to be concise with your words and use images to communicate much of your message. The result is presentations that connect to people.  Many of the most popular slide decks on the large presentation posting site SlideShare were made with Haiku Deck because they draw people in and are memorable.

Accessibility – You can use Haiku Deck to make presentations in a browser on your computer or through the iPad app. Presentations are all backed up on the Haiku Deck site and can be embedded into websites and social media, so you can easily make them available to your participants to reference outside of class.

Just for fun, here’s one last Haiku Deck on the Six Signs of Labor Progression.

Screenshot 2015-03-02 16.32.49

If you try Haiku Deck in your classes, I’d love to see any presentations you develop. Drop the links in the comments section below and let us know if you found the program easy or difficult to use and a bit about your experience.

Resources

Defetyer, M. A., Russo, R., McPartlin, P. L. (2009). The picture superiority effect in recognition memory: a developmental study using the response signal procedure.Cognitive Development, 24, 265-273. doi: 10.1016/j.cogdev.2009.05.002

Foos, P.W., & Goolkasian, P. (2005). Presentation formats in working memory: The role of attention. Memory & Cognition, 33(3), 499-513.

Shepard, R.N. (1967). Recognition memory for words, sentences, and pictures. Journal of Learning and Verbal Behavior, 6, 156-163.

About Jocelyn Alt

© Jocelyn Alt

© Jocelyn Alt

Jocelyn Alt, CD, MBA, is a childbirth educator and birth doula who has been working with expecting and new parents since 2006. Jocelyn is the Founder and Director of Ohana, a birth and parenting services company with locations in Chicago and Seattle that offers childbirth classes, prenatal yoga, doulas, new parent groups, and maternity concierge services. The word ohana means “family” in Hawaiian and refers to one’s inner circle of both family and close friends. In addition to helping parents-to-be transition to parenthood, Jocelyn enjoys hiking, cycling, and hosting dinner parties. She lives in Seattle, WA.  Reach Jocelyn through her website  www.OhanaParents.com.

 

 

 

Childbirth Education, Guest Posts , ,

Henci Goer – Fact Checking the New York Times Home Birth Debate

February 26th, 2015 by avatar
home birth

© HoboMama

An article in The New York Times Opinion Pages – Room for Debate was released on February 24th, 2015.  As customary in this style of article, the NYT asks a variety of experts to provide essays on the topic at hand, in this case, the safety of home birth. Henci Goer, author and international speaker on maternity care, and an occasional contributor to our blog, takes a look at the facts on home birth and evaluates how they line up with some of the essay statements. Read Henci’s analysis below.  – Sharon Muza, Science & Sensibility Community Manager

As one would predict, three of the four obstetricians participating in the NY Times debate “Is Home Birth Ever a Safe Choice?“assert that home birth is unacceptably risky. Equally predictably, the evidentiary support for their position is less than compelling.

John Jennings, MD president of the American Congress of Obstetricians & Gynecologists, in his response- “Emergency Care Can Be Too Urgently Needed,” cites a 2010 meta-analysis by Wax and colleagues that has been thoroughly debunked. Here is but one of the many commentaries, Meta-Analysis: The Wrong Tool Wielded Improperly, pointing out its weaknesses. In a nutshell, the meta-analysis includes studies in its newborn mortality calculation that were not confined to low-risk women having planned home births with a qualified home birth attendant while omitting a well-conducted Dutch home birth study that dwarfed the others in size and reported equivalent newborn death rates in low-risk women beginning labor at home and similar women laboring in the hospital (de Jonge 2009).

The other naysayers, Grunebaum and Chervenak, in their response – “Home Birth Is Not Safe“, source their support to an earlier NY Times blog post that, in turn, cites a study conducted by the two commentators (and others) (Grunebaum 2014). Their study uses U.S. birth certificate data from 2006 to 2009 to compare newborn mortality (day 1 to day 28) rates at home births attended by a midwife, regardless of qualifications, with births attended by a hospital-based midwife, who almost certainly would be a certified nurse midwife (CNM) in babies free of congenital anomalies, weighing 2500 g or more, and who had reached 37 weeks gestation. The newborn mortality rate with home birth midwives was 126 per 10,000 versus 32 per 10,000 among the hospital midwives, nearly a 4-fold difference. However, as an American College of Nurse-Midwives commentary on the abstract for the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine presentation that preceded the study’s publication observed, vital statistics data aren’t reliably accurate, don’t permit confident determination of intended place of birth, and don’t follow transfers of care during labor.

As it happens, we have a study that is accurate and allows us to do both those things. The Midwives Alliance of North America study reports on almost 17,000 planned home births taking place between 2004 and 2009 (Cheyney 2014b), and therefore overlapping Grunebaum and Chervenak’s analysis, in which all but 1000 births (6%) were attended by certified or licensed home birth midwives. According to the MANA stats, the newborn death rate in women who had never had a cesarean and who were carrying one, head-down baby, free of lethal congenital anomalies was 53 per 10,000, NOT 126 per 10,000. This is less than half the rate in the Grunebaum and Chervenak analysis. (As a side note, let me forestall a critique of the MANA study, which is that midwives simply don’t submit births with bad outcomes to the MANA database. In point of fact, midwives register women in the database in pregnancy [Cheyney 2014a], before, obviously, labor outcome could be known. Once enrolled, data are logged throughout pregnancy, labor and birth, and the postpartum, so once in the system, women can’t fall off the radar screen.)

We’re not done. Grunebaum and Chervenak’s analysis suffers from another glaring flaw as well. Using hospital based midwives as the comparison group would seem to make sense at first glance, but unlike the MANA stats, which recorded outcomes regardless of where women ultimately gave birth or who attended them, hospital-based midwives would transfer care to an obstetrician when complications arose. This would remove labors at higher risk of newborn death from their statistics because the obstetrician would be listed on the birth certificate as the attendant, not the midwife. For this reason, the hospital midwife rate of 32 per 10,000 is almost certainly artificially low. So Grunebaum and Chervenak’s difference of 94 per 10,000 has become 21 per 10,000 at most and probably much less than that, a difference that I’d be willing to bet isn’t statistically significant, meaning unlikely to be due to chance. On the other hand, studies consistently find that, even attended by midwives, several more low-risk women per 100 will end up with cesarean surgery—more if they’re first-time mothers—then compared with women planning home births (Romano, 2012).

Hopefully, I’ve helped to provide a defense for those who may find themselves under attack as a result of the NY Times article. I’m not sanguine, though. As can be seen by Jennings, Grunebaum, and Chervenak, people against home birth often fall into the category of “My mind is made up; don’t confuse me with the facts.”

photo source: creative commons licensed (BY-NC-SA) flickr photo by HoboMama: http://flickr.com/photos/44068064@N04/8586579077

References

Cheyney, M., Bovbjerg, M., Everson, C., Gordon, W., Hannibal, D., & Vedam, S. (2014). Development and validation of a national data registry for midwife-led births: the Midwives Alliance of North America Statistics Project 2.0 dataset. J Midwifery Womens Health, 59(1), 8-16. doi: 10.1111/jmwh.12165 http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24479670

Cheyney, M., Bovbjerg, M., Everson, C., Gordon, W., Hannibal, D., & Vedam, S. (2014b). Outcomes of care for 16,924 planned home births in the United States: the midwives alliance of north america statistics project, 2004 to 2009. J Midwifery Womens Health, 59(1), 17-27. doi: 10.1111/jmwh.12172 http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24479690

de Jonge, A., van der Goes, B. Y., Ravelli, A. C., Amelink-Verburg, M. P., Mol, B. W., Nijhuis, J. G., . . . Buitendijk, S. E. (2009). Perinatal mortality and morbidity in a nationwide cohort of 529,688 low-risk planned home and hospital births. BJOG 116(9), 1177-1184. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=1177%5Bpage%5D+AND+2009%5Bpdat%5D+AND+de+jonge%5Bauthor%5D&cmd=detailssearch

Grunebaum, A., McCullough, L. B., Sapra, K. J., Brent, R. L., Levene, M. I., Arabin, B., & Chervenak, F. A. (2014). Early and total neonatal mortality in relation to birth setting in the United States, 2006-2009. Am J Obstet Gynecol, 211(4), 390 e391-397. doi: 10.1016/j.ajog.2014.03.047 http://www.ajog.org/article/S0002-9378(14)00275-0/abstract

Romano, A. (2012). The place of birth: home births. In Goer H. & Romano A. (Eds.), Optimal Care in Childbirth: The Case for a Physiologic Approach. Seattle, WA: Classic Day Publishing.

Wax, J. R., Lucas, F. L., Lamont, M., Pinette, M. G., Cartin, A., & Blackstone, J. (2010). Maternal and newborn outcomes in planned home birth vs planned hospital births: a metaanalysis. Am J Obstet Gynecol, 203(3), 243.e241-e248. http://www.ajog.org/article/S0002-9378%2810%2900671-X/abstract

About Henci Goer

Henci Goer

Henci Goer

Henci Goer, award-winning medical writer and internationally known speaker, is the author of The Thinking Woman’s Guide to a Better Birth and Optimal Care in Childbirth: The Case for a Physiologic Approach She is the winner of the American College of Nurse-Midwives “Best Book of the Year” award. An independent scholar, she is an acknowledged expert on evidence-based maternity care.  

 

 

Babies, Evidence Based Medicine, Guest Posts, Home Birth, Maternal Quality Improvement, Maternity Care, Midwifery , , , , ,

Online Course- “Labor Pain Management: Techniques for Comfort & Coping” Goes Live

February 24th, 2015 by avatar

online course adLamaze International is very pleased to announce the release of their fourth and newest online Lamaze childbirth education course for expectant families.  This newest offering, “Labor Pain Management: Techniques for Comfort and Coping” provides families with coping skills for all the stages and phases of labor, from early labor right through pushing and birth.  All of the Lamaze International online courses are interactive, filled with great photographs and graphics, and based on the most current evidence.  You can read more about the previous courses that were released in this post from November, 2014.  Our first online course: Safe and Healthy Birth: Six Simple Steps was released in early 2014 when Lamaze unveiled the Online Parent Learning Center.

Lamaze International expanding into online childbirth education

The Lamaze International Strategic Framework 2014-2017 that resulted from in-depth strategic planning meetings held in 2014 with the Board of Directors and Lamaze management resulted in many forward thinking, comprehensive and courageous goals, including plans to “innovate education and expand to the childbearing years” by:

  • reaching more women earlier and more frequently throughout childbearing years,
  • expanding delivery methods for online education (e.g., virtual classes, Facetime consults, and mobile apps), and
  • developing a strategy to broaden outreach at the electronic level and cultivate moms ‘up’ the ladder for more personalized services and training.

Labor Pain Management: Techniques for Comfort and Coping

The course description lets families know that “labor and birth require a lot of physical and mental preparation. As you get ready for your upcoming birth, you will want to have a variety of comfort measures and coping techniques in your labor toolbox so that you and your support team can be as prepared as possible. Learning helpful labor positions and strategies to promote labor progress will allow your body to work with your baby toward a safe and healthy birth. Lamaze International has created this class to provide you with the information and skills you will need to minimize discomfort and labor confidently.”

The voice over sections with the birth story were particularly helpful in making me feel like others have gone through this – so I can too.” – online course participant.

The class objectives

After completing this class learners will be able to:

  • Use learned relaxation skills suitable for early labor
  • Practice a variety of comfort techniques that minimize active labor discomfort
  • Understand back labor and how to cope with back pain while encouraging baby to turn
  • Plan for transition with effective labor strategies
  • Learn the top positions for pushing that open the pelvis and shorten the pushing time

Practice makes perfect

Interactive activities invite parents to practice coping activities, breathing skills and different positions alone and with a partner to see what might work for them in labor.  They can also follow along with a birth story from start to finish, woven throughout the course, to see how a new family applied the skills covered in the course at their own birth.  Families are encouraged to stop and practice newly learned techniques and note what they think will work well for them in labor.  The sections of the course detail what is happening physiologically during each phase and offers suggestions for emotional and physical  coping and comfort techniques that might be helpful.  Families are introduced to positions and activities to practice as they near the end of their pregnancies, so they are familiar with them prior to labor beginning.  The course builds confidence in the pregnant person that they will have many helpful techniques to try, and demonstrates the important role of the birth partner and other support people who will be in attendance.  There is also information about how to continue to promote labor progress should a woman choose to have an epidural.

I loved how easy the online format was, and I completed the entire class with my husband, who learned a lot about his role in birth supporting me. – online course participant.

This self-paced class is accessible on both desktop and mobile devices, and discussion forums built into the course encourage community building and online engagement with other families.

Class participants are able to repeat the course material as often as they wish and fun quizzes spaced throughout reinforce their learning.  At the end of the course, families are provided with the benefits of taking an in-person online class, and directed to the “Find a Lamaze Class” section of the parent website to locate a class in their area.

Online courses still to come in 2015 include Parenting Together: Starting Off Strong and Prepared for Pregnancy: Start Off Right, which are still in development.  Existing classes that are available now are:

  • Labor Pain Management: Techniques for Comfort and Coping
  • VBAC: Informed and Ready
  • Breastfeeding Basics: From Birth to Back to Work
  • Safe and Healthy Birth: Six Simple Steps

To learn more about this newest addition to the Lamaze International online course catalogue, preview the courses and persuse all the offerings, please visit the online course catalog.

Childbirth Education, Lamaze International, News about Pregnancy , , , ,

New Electronic Fetal Monitoring Infographic Along with Printables of All Infographics!

February 19th, 2015 by avatar

Screen Shot 2015-02-18 at 9.21.29 PM

Lamaze International has released a new infographic; “Can Good Intentions Backfire in Labor? A closer look at continuous electronic fetal monitoring (EFM). This infographic is suitable for childbirth educators, doulas and birth professionals to use and share with clients and students.

Many birthing people and their families feel that monitoring in the form of continuous EFM (CEFM) during labor means a safer outcome for both the pregnant person and baby.  But as the infographic clearly states, (and as the research shows) since the invention of the continuous EFM, more than 60 years ago, newborn outcomes have not improved and in fact worsened.  CEFM used on normal, healthy, low risk labors does not make things better and can often create a situation that requires action (such as a cesarean birth) when the reality is that all was fine.

EFMInfographic_FINALAs educators, we have a responsibility to the families we work with to share what the evidence shows about continuous fetal monitoring.  Families may be surprised to learn that CEFM is not necessary for a spontaneous labor that is progressing normally and with a baby who is tolerating labor well.  Many of us may cover this topic when we talk about the 4th Healthy Birth Practice – Avoid Interventions that are Not Medically Necessary.  CEFM during a low risk, spontaneous labor is not medically necessary.  Helping families to understand this information and setting them up to have conversations with their health care providers about when CEFM might become necessary is an important discussion to have in childbirth class. Now there is this Lamaze International infographic on CEFM to help you facilitate conversations with your clients and students.

Lamaze International has also listened to the needs of educators and in addition to having the infographics available on a web page, all of the infographics are available as printable 8 1/2″ x 11″ handouts that you can share with families.  Alternately, for versions to laminate or hang in your classroom or office, you can choose to print the jpg versions in the original format. And of course, they will also reside on the Lamaze International Professional website.  Hop on over to check out all the infographics on a variety of topics.

Parents can find the EFM infographic as part of the educational material on the EFM information page on the parent website.

How do you cover the topic of continuous electronic fetal monitoring in your classes?  Will you be likely to use this new infographic as part of your curriculum?  Let us know in the comments section below.

Childbirth Education, Evidence Based Medicine, Fetal Monitoring, Healthy Birth Practices, Lamaze International, Maternal Quality Improvement, Medical Interventions, Push for Your Baby, Uncategorized , , , , , ,

Care Model Innovations – Changing The Way Maternity Care Is Provided

February 17th, 2015 by avatar
© Serena O'Dwyer

© Serena O’Dwyer

Amy Romano was the original community manager, editor and writer of Science & Sensibility back when this blog was first established by Lamaze International in 2009.  After a healthy stint in that role, Amy has since moved on to other positions and most recently can be found in the position of Vice President of Health Ecosystems at Maternity Neighborhood, a technology company providing digital tools and apps to maternity health care providers around the world.  Additionally, Amy has been focused on finishing up her MBA at the same time.  (Talk about multitasking!)

While moving on to other things, Amy has not stopped blogging and I have been enjoying her most recent series on care model innovation in maternity care in particular and healthcare in general.  The series started in October of 2014, and Amy just published the seventh post in her ten post series. The entire series is part of Amy’s school work toward receiving her MBA.  That is a great blend of combining her degree program with her work, with her passion and interest.

Amy decided to look at four care models in particular: Nurse-Family Partnership, community-based doulas, midwife-led maternity services, and CenteringPregnancy. In talking with Amy, she shared that one of the things that really struck her is that these evidence-based care models are all very much relationship-based. She is more convinced than ever that trusting relationships are the “secret sauce” of good birth outcomes.

The posts available in the series so far include:

  1. What is care model innovation?
  2. The case for care model innovation in U.S. maternity care
  3. Care models that work: Nurse-Family Partnership
  4. Care models that work: Doulas as community health workers
  5. Care models that work: Midwife-led maternity services
  6. Care models that work: Group Prenatal Care
  7. Early examples of payment innovation in maternity care

And those posts yet to come:

8.  More mature payment reform models: An overview
9.  Driving community-based care through payment reform
10. The data infrastructure required for care model transformation

Particularly helpful are the references and learning resources that Amy includes in each of her posts, where the reader can go for more information and to dig deeper into the programs and research that Amy used to substantiate her research.

Changing the maternity care model currently in place is a critical piece for helping to improve the current status of both maternal morbidity and mortality as well as neonatal morbidity and mortality in the USA, which despite our abundance of resources, still has our world ranking in these categories shamefully at the bottom of the list.

According to Amy:

We’re in the midst of a “perfect storm” right now, with implementation of health care reform and lots of forces changing healthcare to be more patient-centered and integrated with community services. If ever there was a time when midwifery care, doulas, physiologic birth practices, etc., were going to take hold, that time is now.

As I have been reading Amy’s series, I have been struck by how some of her posts have reinforced the Lamaze Six Healthy Birth Practices themes, in particular #3 – Bring a friend, loved one or doula for continuous support, and #4 – Avoid interventions that are not medically necessary.

I asked Amy to share what her thoughts on what the role of the childbirth educator was in this time of transition.  Her response:

I think childbirth educators have lots of opportunities in the new healthcare landscape, but it will require a shift in thinking for some. New payment models will reward team-based care and CBEs have an important potential role as valued members of these teams, helping to implement shared decision making, help with care navigation/coordination, and extending educational offerings to postpartum/parenting, special conditions (e.g. gestational diabetes), etc. 

Amy Romano

Amy Romano

We need innovative ideas, forward thinking, and the ability to examine what we are currently doing with a critical eye, if we are to design and implement maternity care programs that improve outcomes and utilize resources more effectively to help mothers and babies.  As Amy highlights, there are existing programs that have shown great results and deserve the opportunity to be implemented on a wider scale.

Take some time to read the seven posts and come back to the Maternity Neighborhood blog to catch the final three when they become available.  Share your thoughts about what Amy is discussing as she rolls out the entire series.  And, consider what your role will be in the changing landscape of care that women receive during their childbearing year.

Babies, Childbirth Education, Doula Care, Healthcare Reform, Healthy Birth Practices, Maternal Mortality, Maternal Quality Improvement, Maternity Care, Midwifery, New Research, Newborns, Research , , , , , , ,